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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I live in Reno, NV where I can do a spica to weber conversion on my 79 sport sedan. Spica was toast after not running for 20 years and wiring eaten by field mice. Engine has been overhauled and I found a nice weber conversion kit in someone's garage for $500.
I bought the facet electric low pressure fuel pump and removed the high pressure pump. I'd like to use the same location, and was hoping someone can send me a nice photo of their facet pump location on their alfetta?
Facet pump is nice since it has a filter and I'm using one up front by the carbs too. Not too sure I need the fuel regulator though. Read about 50% use or don't use the fuel regulator.
 

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sad that no one has responded. I don't have a pic but I have used some zip ties to hang mine near the end of the fuel pipe. It is a difficult install I agree as there is no obvious place for it. This reduces the vibration. I have just ordered a non return valve (nrv) as the facet pump I bought does not have one... Once the nrv arrives I will mount the new vertically next to/from the small fuel regulator bracket with a small right angle bracket fixed into the same bolt holes the regulator/filter is attached to. I found the regulator with it's fuel filter a good insurance against over pressure through the carby's. If the car has sat for 20 years... beware of the crap coming through the fuel lines. It will block the carbies good and proper!
 

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I assume that you have the cylindrical Bendix type pump that sells for about $100 and not the cheap cube pump. The pump should be mounted as low as possible as it needs a little head pressure on the inlet side. The manufacturer recommends that it be mounted vertically with the inlet at the bottom. When I had one on my Spider I mounted it on a vertical section of floor. I strongly recommend that you fit a pressure regulator. Webers like 3 psi. Go 1 psi either way and you may have problems.
My experiences with pumps are here http://www.alfabb.com/bb/forums/carburetors-fuel-injection-air-intake/207896-fuel-pumps-webers.html

I ended up removing the Facet and replacing it with a Carter vane pump.
 

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HI Ed, No I got the small block pump and it is located as low as I could get. I have the 40mm Delortos and so far the problem has been blocked jets. I will continue this at the link provided in Ed'd link above.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
OK if you're familiar with the current location of the fuel injection pump on a 78 alfa sport sedan you'll know what I'm talking about. I removed the old fuel injection pump from down and around from the passenger side rear wheel arch. I mounted the facet low psi pump using the same rubber footed bracket, keeping the inlet side lower than the outlet side, as per mounting instructions. I'll make a metal cover for the pump and hoses similar to the removed cover of the original fuel injection pump utilizing the existing mount.

No fuel filter between tank and pump, but an appropriate low psi fuel filter inline before the two 40 Webers. The mount was pretty easy, but I thought someone else might have done some other modification. I'll follow up and let people know how it operates.
 

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If this is where I think it is (under the car and exposed) aren't you just asking for trouble with water, dirt, rock etc.? Have you have had a look at the link Ed provided as there is some good information there? The US cars (SPICA) are different to the rest of the world and I am presuming that Alfa did a retrofit to comply with US (Cali') emissions requirements. The fuel pumps for the rest of the world (pre 1980) are at the front of the car, mechanically driven on the engine below the distributor using a diaphragm pump and combined fuel filter and regulator. I have included the regulator as an "insurance" option. My advice would be to put the pump under the carbs as short hoses will not mess with your output pressures and large hoses for pump inlet (if needed) are an easy fix.
It is winter here and raining. I will try to get some pics for you. The more I think about this, the more I think the pump would be better located at the front as was done with all alfas with the exception of the SPICA cars (I think?) and that I think probably has to with a sealed tank and the high pressure requirements of fuel injection.
See notes above re pulsing. A regulator may save you lots of annoyance.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
US cars are much different from the rest of the alfa world. No fuel pump on the engine. No such luck with a SPICA conversion. Fuel pump is right were the old fuel injection pump goes, and I'm fabricating a metal cover from the old metal cover. The hoses for the low psi pump are about the same length and diameter for the fuel injection pump. Fuel injection pump has been in that location since 1978 with no issues.

The only exposed fuel lines under the car are the ones shown in the photos, and the fuel tank to hard plumbed fuel lines under the car. From the fuel pump location to the short 2 ft length to the carbs, its all hard plumbing pipe rubber covered.
I had a 69 mgb and its fuel pump was in the same area. Good to get at with a hammer should you want to kick start it.
 
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