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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Ive just finshed building a 1979 Alfetta gtv 2L with a 3/4 race engine with pace cams and larger carbs etc had it on the road for a week is there a v6 engine in Australia with carbs and how hard is it to install not knowing alot about alfettas or alfa romeos any info would be good cheers:)
 

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The V6 was only ever available with carbs (outside SA) in the Alfa Six sedan. Those are not common to find in the US, since they never imported it. Don't know about in Australia. It's the 2.5L motor.

On the other hand, the L-Jet injection on the GTV6, Milano, 33, etc motors is simple, doesn't take much wiring, and runs a lot better than carbs. You can get that motor in 3.0L form which is more fun than the 2.5 though it doesn't rev quite as high.

Upgrading an Alfetta chassis to take the Six is not too hard, but there are a lot of little updates. I'm sure someone here knows better than I do what to update, but I think front brakes are one thing. I believe the Alfetta had solid discs in the front whereas the later cars had vented ones with (frequently) Brembo aluminum calipers. The driveshaft I believe is beefier as well.

Of course the body is nearly the same so you should be able to use plenty of stock parts to upgrade it.

If you've just rebuilt your "3/4 race" motor I would think you'd want to keep it around for awhile...

Hope that helps a bit.

Karl
 

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Garth,

I fit the running gear and electronics from a 1982 GTV6 (U.S.) to a 1977 Alfetta GTV (U.K.) about fifteen years ago.

Mechanically, the hardest part of it was modifying the chassis mounting points for the motor to V6 specs. From memory; I used the GTV6 engine, bellhousing, driveshaft, couplings, centrebearing and housing (holes required enlarging), transaxle & halfshafts. I retained the Alfetta subframe/deDion and using the GTV6 hub-carriers to mate with the GTV6 half-shafts, retaining the 4 lug wheels.

I didn't change to the GTV6 front torsion bar and brakes, though if I had the budget for it I would have. The standard T bar worked surprisingly well with the extra weight (maybe due to the bilsteins?). The brakes coped well also, never once showing signs of fade, though driven briskly.

Electronics. The GTV6 ECU and ECU harness were installed in the standard GTV6 position and spiced into the Alfetta electrics with about 6 hrs work, by an auto electrician. The GTV6 tach was used and I don't remember how what was done with the speedo (sorry).

My research at the time indicated that the 4cyl tranaxle and half shafts had been used successfully in the past (and were lighter:)), but I thought the stronger transaxle was worth the extra expenditure. I had had problems with the 4cyl couplings, so I was glad to upgrade to 6cyl shaft and couplings.

Should you decide to go this way, I suggest acquiring an entire GTV6 donor vehicle and doing a direct transplant. The standard 2.5 is a joy but will not add much performance (if any) to your current set-up. Now a 3ltr is really worth it!
 

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And no, there's no carb'd V6 in Australia. I dont think there was any carb'd V6 after the Alfa sei with its six-Dell orto set-up. Mmm, fun.
 

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the speedo drive on a gtv6 is still cabled so you can just drop in the cable hook up onto the v6 transaxle and retain the stock speedo and cable
 
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