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On the bad side:
  • When you can vacuum a hole in the body with a shop vac, you know you have rust to deal with. Vacuumed a hole in the RH frame rail right above the steering rack. This thing sat under a leaking roof and the RH cowl is gone, RH inner fender (and outer) is gone, and RH frame rail is questionable. I don't mind cutting and splicing metal, but this is getting pretty deep.
Do you potentially have a parts car that could be used to make another one awesome?
Pete
 

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I'm in need of the same repaint on my badges. Can you tell me what Testors colors you used?
Sure thing, I used: 1169TT Flat Yellow, 1164TT Flat Green, 1150TT Flat Red, 1149TT Flat Black, then I clear coated it with Testors High Gloss Spray Enamel 1814T. Use light coats with the spray clear, I think it softens the enamel underneath slightly so if you use too much you'll end up with a really lumpy finish.

Compared to the photos of the NOS badges, its not really the same color shades as used originally. I guess that's artistic license, looks good to me anyway.
 

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Discussion Starter · #83 ·
Hi Pete,

There is always that potential. However, I kinda like this little car. It is very different from the GVT6.

Goals currently are:
  • Get the engine to run (closer, but not there yet)
  • Get the clutch hydraulics working
  • Get the brakes to work (likely $$$)
If I hit a roadblock on the first one that costs serious money, then I'll have to reconsider. (i.e. Spica pump is bad). I do like to fabricate and weld, but need to make sure the car is viable before diving into that. :)
 

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You can get the Bosch fuel injection off of a Spider (the whole engine/L-jet harness even, of course not oil pan). You can get Spica fixed at another time. I believe fab and weld may be needed for intake.

Not sure if this is actually cheaper tho.
 

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Discussion Starter · #85 ·
I Runs!!

Woo Hoo!!

Got a set of better jumper cables and cleaned all the positive and negative connection points. It cranked over much more quickly. After a few minutes fired and ran. It idles pretty good. Put a little temperature into it, but did not want to run too long - no water pump belt. Kicked it off a couple more times over the weekend, just because it is so exciting. Each time, just a little cranking with an increasing throttle and it pops right off. :)

Pulled the seized alternator and squirted a little PB blaster in and worked it around until it turned freely. Took it to the local alternator / starter rebuild shop and it tested fine (bearings a bit noisy). It will be good enough for now.

Air filters, belts on order from Centerline. I am hopeful to run it up to temperature soon.

Witty dropped by to pick up some parts from the load and dropped off a brand new clutch slave (Thank you). I have a new clutch master and hose, so that will be the next system to try and get operational. Maybe brakes for Christmas?? Probably too hopeful.
 

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Discussion Starter · #86 ·
A bit of a sidetrack. Since I got this to run, it makes sense to service the filters and get it ready to be driven. Went to change the SPICA oil filter - not a problem. Easy to get to. I even was aware of the "stripped stud" risk and was being gentle. But one question:

WHO THE $%**@ DESIGNED THAT COVER AND RETENTION!

It didn't take any effort to strip off a stud, and then of course the housing would not seal up. Who designs the studs to be softer than the nuts??? I ended up replacing the studs with hardened allen head bolt shanks. Now at least I can tighten normally.

This of course meant removing the pump - which meant removing the radiator to gain access. Not difficult, but I did not have that in the near term plans. Oh well, guess it gives good timing to replace all the coolant hoses - needed done anyway.

Here is the lower housing with the offending stud removed and the "before and after" of the allen screw:

Motor vehicle Gas Automotive exterior Auto part Nut



Had to drill out the old stud, since grabbing with a vice grip just resulted in shearing off the remainder. The studs are made from garbage. Cut the other two off and drilled them out as well - it was only a matter of time and they would strip too. Here are the tools used:

I used the stepped center drill to locate the center of the stud (installed the cover on the remaining two studs and used the hole to locate over the cut off stud). Then tap drilled and tapped using the set that I picked up at Ace. Finally, cut the allen screw down to make the stud and loctited it into the housing. You can see my depth guides on the tap drill and tap.

Font Electric blue Tool Slip joint pliers Fashion accessory


So my plans for change the oil and work on the clutch this weekend were a failure. Oh - also found that the thermostatic actuator is bad when I pulled the pump. Not surprising. Plus the fuel flow was plumbed backwards (orifice before the pump) by the PO. I'm going to have to keep my eyes open. It will be better when it goes back together!
 
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Discussion Starter · #87 ·
And if you think the cowl rust on this one is bad, take a look at the RH frame rail. About 18" of the bottom is missing! :oops: It will be easy enough to fix, but wow! Sorry for the lousy photo.

Wheel Tire Hood Automotive tire Vehicle


Before I start repairs (after this runs and drives) I need to photo document all the rusty spots. I'm actually looking forward to the patching (what is wrong with me??)
 

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Welcome, again, to the sometimes nightmare that is servicing our wonderful Alfas. I believe Italians think a car is a better/faster/sexier car if it is hard to work on, so designing something that is logical and easy to work on goes against their masculinity ...
Pete
 

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Discussion Starter · #89 ·
Weekly update:

Sorry if this is not exciting. One step forward, two steps back (OK maybe not that bad).

Got the injection pump back in the car. Jammed the driveshaft with "my favorite tool" (a small hexagonal pry bar that I find indispensable) and used a 38mm socket on a breaker bar to get the crank pulley loose. Had to stand on the engine and use my weight on the bar. This was after about an hour trying to bend back the lock tab on the central nut. Had to fabricate a punch from an old screwdriver. I now have another Alfa "special tool" :)

Pulley would not come off the crank, but slid forward enough to get the belt on. Also installed the water pump / alternator belt.

Started the car and bled out the SPICA filter. Tightened the cover nuts and it sealed up. I'm now back where I was a week ago! Changed the engine oil and filter since there was a lot going on to get the motor unstuck. Good to have clean stuff in there now.

Figured I would install the new clutch master and slave and get that system working. A couple of hours upside down and underneath the dash and the master was in. This is a young man's job and I am not that any more! Pressure bled the master and then --- blew out the hard line to the slave. Rusted. Will need to drop the exhaust, De-dion and Transaxle to install the new hard line. Will make refreshing the salve and rear brakes easier at least.

I am going to wait until I get the engine fully up and running, check the SPICA adjustments before continuing with the clutch. That way I can run it with a full exhaust. I have coolant hoses and a thermostatic actuator on their way, so maybe next weekend I can get that end buttoned up. So far the parts that came with the car have funded the parts that have gone into the car (T/A has been biggest cost so far)

Spent that last couple of hours on Sunday cutting out a new floor for the battery compartment from an old hood. First of many rust repairs. I'd like to get rid of the jumper cable umbilical cord to the truck. I should capture some pictures of this going in, as that will be more interesting to see than my clutch contortions! Stay tuned.
 
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It's interesting that you blew the hard hydraulic line to the slave. I did too except mine was the brake line to the rear. It was PITA to replace. The moisture from the ground in that garage was just horrendous.
 

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Discussion Starter · #91 ·
Hi Witty,

I figure that I will replace all the hard lines aft of the firewall in one shot. Since the mechanical components need to come out for one line, may as well do them all. Planning to use the nickel-copper material as it is much easier to work with than the old steel stuff.

Removing all the mechanicals in the rear will also give me the opportunity to clean and recoat the floor boards. Some spots are actually not that bad once the crusties are removed, so want to save what I can.

I had visions of getting this up and drivable before the weather turned. I think that is shot. Current "realistic" goal is getting the engine running well. Button up that end of the car.
 

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Spent that last couple of hours on Sunday cutting out a new floor for the battery compartment from an old hood. First of many rust repairs. I'd like to get rid of the jumper cable umbilical cord to the truck.
I am envious of guys like you that have the skills, tooling, space to do stuff like that. I often give secret thumbs up when reading grassroots challenge stuff about guys that go to the dump, get old fridges and freezers, beat the enamel off then use the steel to build cars out of. Makes me feel humble, especially when my own circle will tell me that they think I’m amazing. Keep sharing, love these stories. More so that I’m snowed in now and can’t readily play myself.
 

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Discussion Starter · #93 ·
T/A arrived yesterday - along with 90mph winds! We were without power for a bit. Worst damage I have heard of in my circle of friends are a couple of outbuildings down - not too bad. Definitely more fortunate than those in western KY. Prayers go out to you folks.

While waiting for the T/A I fiddled with the battery box floor. Here is the hood that gave up the metal:
Motor vehicle Automotive exterior Bumper Gas Automotive wheel system


The rusty portions of the old box, the cardboard template and the new origami part ready to be trimmed to fit.

Wood Rectangle Tints and shades Beige Metal


Bench vice, angle grinder with a cut off wheel - not rocket science. I'll remove the battery hold down from the inner wall remainder and weld it into the new part before it goes into the car.

This weekend, I'll probably take some time to get the T/A installed and the SPICA adjusted. Come back to the battery compartment over Christmas. This is assuming I don't have a lot of tree clean up to do. Have yet to see the place in the daylight. :)
 

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I am envious of guys like you that have the skills, tooling, space to do stuff like that. I often give secret thumbs up when reading grassroots challenge stuff about guys that go to the dump, get old fridges and freezers, beat the enamel off then use the steel to build cars out of. Makes me feel humble, especially when my own circle will tell me that they think I’m amazing. Keep sharing, love these stories. More so that I’m snowed in now and can’t readily play myself.
Vintagemilano,

Your comment made me think of a car at the Lane Museum, the 1956 Kleinschnittger F-125. If you Google it, you'll learn that it was built in post-war Germany with mostly surplus airplane parts. They even reportedly used aluminum pots and pans beaten into sheet metal for its bodywork! Pretty close to what you described.

Bob in Nashville
 

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Discussion Starter · #95 ·
Sounds like a Jeff Lane car. His collection is awesome - do visit it if you get to Nashville.
 

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Discussion Starter · #96 ·
New T/A is installed and adjusted. Required a bit more work than usual, as the rod extension must be longer than what would be normal for this particular pump. Had to shave the head of the adjusting screw by 0.030, cut a coil out of the retaining spring and cut 0.12 off the threaded end. (thank you Wes for the guidance) I did not have to make a shim for the actuator, and I now have 0.019 pump gap when warm. Still need to adjust the fuel cut off solenoid and then the SPICA is set.

Speaking of "when warm" it now has a functioning cooling system in it. :) New hoses and no leaks as of yet. Ran it up to temperature a couple of times over Christmas break. Satisfied that it starts and runs well.

Now on to the rear of the car. I cut the rear muffler off and welded on the new/used ANSA version. I really like the up and over, twin tip of these mufflers - just looks obnoxious! I need to weld in the battery box floor next. Then drop the De-dion and transaxle to rebuild the clutch and brake lines, as well as calipers and slave cylinder.

It is supposed to be -13 deg F on Saturday night - probably won't get a lot done out in the barn this weekend unfortunately.
 

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Subscribing! My journey is about 4 months behind yours and will likely have much in common!! Great work so far Mark!
thanks, bob
 
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Discussion Starter · #98 ·
Had a chance to work on Rocky a bit this weekend. A variety of jobs as the weather was quite varied.

Friday / Saturday: We had a snow storm blow through, so working in the barn would not be too pleasant.
I had pulled the clutch assembly from the transaxle that Witty had dropped off earlier in the year. Popped off the pressure plate and the disk looks good. A little wire brush work and the flywheel and pressure plate look decent - at least I won't start out with a stuck disk! Will need to pack the throw out bearing, but it turns smoothly. Very interesting how different the Alfetta clutch is from the GTV6 or Milano.

Spent the cold part of Saturday cleaning the clutch housing. Degreaser and scotch brite pad made it look very nice!

Saturday PM and Sunday: The sun came out and dried up all the rain. So the itsy bitsy spider went to the barn again.
I figured I may as well look and see if the transaxle had LSD. (Hope springs eternal) So I cut of the hex bolts holding the spacer and remaining disk to the stub axle. Those hex bolts are awful. The Allen bolts of the more modern versions are way better to work with - hence the grinder for these. Then pulled the caliper and the side of the case. Nope - just an open differential. It looked good inside though. I will use this and the transaxle that is in the car to make a "rebuilt" using the best of the two. At least the one in the car has the Allen bolts. Probably means someone has already been in there. Hmmm... starting to think of LSD again. :)

Since it was warmer, I figured I would get the floor of the battery box welded in. If you remember, the battery had fallen through the bottom on the trip back from Chicago. The sides of the box and floor of the trunk were not terribly rusted, so easy enough to trim up. A lot of trimming to fit, overhead welding, sparks in the hair and weld flash. Now I have a good battery box floor. I will use seam sealer to cover up my booger welds and fill the holes between them, but given the condition around the repair, I am not displeased.

Before:
Tire Wheel Vehicle Car Automotive tire


After:
Tire Wheel Automotive tire Tread Wood


Now I can start shopping for a battery and the car won't have to be started on the umbilical to the truck.

Since I had the welder out, the next project was to weld the ANSA muffler to the standard muffler inlet pipe. I had tacked this in place previously, so marked it well, pulled the pieces out and finished the job. The welds look a little better, since I wasn't welding overhead! Next steps at the rear will be to drop the driveline so that I can rebuild the clutch and brake lines. I'll need a full, warm weekend for that!

I had a bit of time left Sunday afternoon. I have never been able to open the passenger door. I knew that I needed to access the mechanism, which meant pulling the door card w/o opening the door. At least these are just screwed to the door, no fancy clips. About 1/2 of the screws came out and the other half need to be drilled because of rust. Once the screws were gone, the door card came off pretty easily. It was really flexible, soggy and moldy. I will need to rebuild that sometime.

Then came the PB Blaster and working to get the lock mechanism to move. Vice grips clamped to the rod, lubrication and a few taps with the hammer and the door would lock and unlock. The latches were still frozen. More juice, slow and determined working and suddenly the exterior handle opened the door. A bit more and the interior also worked! The bottom of the door held some rusty yuck, but I was pleasantly surprised that there was a bottom of the door!

Still had a bit of Sunday left, so started all the cars in storage (The Vette, Milo, the white GTV6 and Rocky) and let them warm up enough to remove the condensation from the engines - and had a beer! Good progress.
 
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Not the best picture - it was dark in the barn this morning!
View attachment 1706669
My 1978 looks just like this, with the radio delete plate behind the stereo, cut up to fit the stereo.

Are the Blaupunkt radios and pioneer speakers stock?
 
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