Alfa Romeo Forums banner
21 - 40 of 137 Posts

·
Registered
1979 Sprint Veloce
Joined
·
434 Posts
My '79 Sprint Veloce has/had the factory a/c. They removed all the under-hood stuff years ago. I have a line on an original compressor bracket from a local guy. Eventually I want to resurrect the a/c, with a Sanden or Sanden-type compressor. Will it fit on the original York bracket? If not, what other options do I have?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,598 Posts
Discussion Starter · #22 ·
Fabrication baby!

I would not recommend starting with the York brackery. It is big and cumbersome. There must be a better way.
 

·
Moderator
Joined
·
2,248 Posts
@ NMMilano: You can edit your post and delete the duplicate pictures.

That is the better AC bracket that came on some Alfettas.
It mounts the heavy compressor down low thus reducing stress on the cylinder head.
Rotary compressors also reduced vibration.
Notice the extended exhaust header stud to mount the bracket.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
55 Posts
Alfa sold three special Alfetta GT versions in the USA;first-the Mario Andretti edition,then the Mille Miglia and lastly the Velocissima. This particular Alfetta is the Mille Miglia version. From the factory the special parts were;rear wiper/washer; rear flying buttress spoiler;Quadrafoglio cloisonne badges on the external C pillar;14" Ronal A-1 wheels;a digital clock on the dash and 3 Mille Miglia badges. There were no mechanical upgrades. I believe they made 500 Mille Miglia editions. Good luck with your efforts to revive your Alfetta. I've parted out 5 or 6 of them and have lots of spare bits if you find yourself looking for parts.
Hi I’m restoring a 79 as well and do needs some parts! Cane you send me your contact info...
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
55 Posts
Alfa sold three special Alfetta GT versions in the USA;first-the Mario Andretti edition,then the Mille Miglia and lastly the Velocissima. This particular Alfetta is the Mille Miglia version. From the factory the special parts were;rear wiper/washer; rear flying buttress spoiler;Quadrafoglio cloisonne badges on the external C pillar;14" Ronal A-1 wheels;a digital clock on the dash and 3 Mille Miglia badges. There were no mechanical upgrades. I believe they made 500 Mille Miglia editions. Good luck with your efforts to revive your Alfetta. I've parted out 5 or 6 of them and have lots of spare bits if you find yourself looking for parts.
Hello Rickety here. I also have a 79 GT that I am restoring that I need a few parts. Jim would you please contact me, here is my contact info: Richard Neff. [email protected]. 330-604-6046. Text ok too.🙏
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,281 Posts
Alfa sold three special Alfetta GT versions in the USA;first-the Mario Andretti edition,then the Mille Miglia and lastly the Velocissima. This particular Alfetta is the Mille Miglia version. From the factory the special parts were;rear wiper/washer; rear flying buttress spoiler;Quadrafoglio cloisonne badges on the external C pillar;14" Ronal A-1 wheels;a digital clock on the dash and 3 Mille Miglia badges. There were no mechanical upgrades. I believe they made 500 Mille Miglia editions. Good luck with your efforts to revive your Alfetta. I've parted out 5 or 6 of them and have lots of spare bits if you find yourself looking for parts.

I’m a sucker for the these MM badged cars. I don’t remember what the digital clock looked like? Where was it located…. Anyone have a pic ?
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
698 Posts
I’m a sucker for the these MM badged cars. I don’t remember what the digital clock looked like? Where was it located…. Anyone have a pic ?
The clock is mounted in the “wood” trim on the dash to the left of the tach. It’s a little rectangular digital clock with a red LED display.
 
  • Like
Reactions: davbert

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,598 Posts
Discussion Starter · #35 ·
Interesting - the clock on this car is mounted to the right of the tach. Between the pods. Similar, but not the same clock. Also the rear wiper switch on this car is mounted down next to the hand throttle. There is nothing in the owners manual about the operation of either. Good old Alfa!

Pulled the plugs last night in anticipation of trying to turn it over. They looked good, and what I could see of the valves and pistons they look decent. Pulled the #8 fuse to disable the fuel pump. I want to clean out that system before I try to actually run it. Maybe tonight I will have time to hook it to the truck with jumper cables. :)

Yes, kind of sad about the condition, but glad that this exists at all. If it runs, it will remain a complete car.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,598 Posts
Discussion Starter · #36 ·
Weekend successes:

I thought I would have two afternoons to work on this, but ended up having to spend Sunday afternoon installing a door to keep the dogs in the laundry room. Tired of them rampaging through the house and destroying nearly everything. I stopped keeping track of their total cost around $4K. :)

However - Saturday afternoon was quite productive. Goal was to get the motor to turn over. Had been soaking the cylinders with PB Blaster for a couple of days. Also determined to remove the accessory drive belts in case any accessories were locked up.

Pulled the air cleaner / mouse house off the motor. Smelly and disgusting. The filters were eaten through and the whole housing was full of - yuck. Once it was dumped out, looks like no real damage. :)
Then I looked at the throttle bores. No wonder the bell crank would not move! The rear throttles were highly corroded. At least the throttle plates kept the mice out of the cylinders, but the corrosion needed to go. Scraped it a little and used the shop vac to clean up all around. Then PB Blaster the heck out of it.

Before Image:
Wheel Automotive tire Motor vehicle Automotive lighting Automotive design


Then started working the throttle shaft gently with a pliers. More Blaster and a bit more working finally got the throttle plates moving freely. Yay!

Removed the drive belts next. I was surprised that all bolts and nuts came free relatively easily. Good shots of Blaster just in case. The A/C clutch is free, water pump is free, but the alternator is seized tight. I bet mice crawled up the cooling tube and did their dirty work to cause trouble. The belts were stuck in the pulley grooves - had to peel them out.

Hooked the jumper cables up to the truck and tried turning it over. Whirred away just fine. Woo Hoo! Compression check was not good though (30, 30, 0, 60), but the rings are likely still stuck and very possibly valves may not be closing completely. Will need to continue to soak and see what happens. May have to pull the cam cover too.

Took the rest of the afternoon to feed the leather seats in all three cars and general clean up. Good to end the day on a high note.

So what is next? Need to get the old fuel out, get the fuel pump running, clean the tank and install new filters. A messy and smelly job, but it is looking like there is hope. I probably should check for spark. Cap, rotor, plugs and points look reasonable enough to get the first firing completed.

So far I have about $30 into it for cleaning supplies. I am confident that I can rebuild the alternator on the cheap and I have been successful in getting fuel pumps to work again (might even have a spare in the parts bin). The battery is now showing charge and is on the de-sufating trickle charger - might be able to save it.

On the down side:
Though the throttle now works, the clutch pedal is seized firm. I am anticipating needing master and slave - hopefully just a hone and seals to keep costs down, but I have never experienced a pedal this rock hard. And though most of the body is reasonable, there are a few places of rust that will need to be addressed. Lower end of the tail light panel, battery box and a couple of spots on the roof. And then the worst of it (note that you can see the upper end of the jack where there should be metal :(
Hood Automotive tire Grille Wood Automotive lighting


My wife has named it "Rocky". A previous owner had the last name Bullwinkle (no joke) so it fits. Good Italian name in the Stallone tradition. Feels right to me.
 
  • Like
Reactions: vintagemilano

·
Registered
Joined
·
374 Posts
Nice progress Mark! Just be careful with the fuel pump, it may still have the original type which is the old three ports Bosch which is NLA. I just went with the GTV6 pump and asked APE to send me a FISPA filter housing/regulator from the early 70's Spica car.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
958 Posts
For an Alfetta that's been sitting for 20 years you can expect problems with the gas tank. Alfetta & GTV6 tanks have various internal baffles that prevent you from getting a good visual looksee concerning the tank's innards. I sent the gas tank for my Alfetta sedan(which sat for 5 years) to the local radiator shop to have it boiled out. $95 later the tank was reinstalled and the same fuel starvation problems returned...immediately. The solution I chose was to send the tank to Gas Tank Renu where they cut it open, repair and seal the tank interior, and then seal the exterior. It's very expensive-my tank was $525- Ouch!-but it's the only choice that guarantees you a clean fuel system iffn you can't find a new tank....and there are no new tanks. The condition of the gas tank in my 84 GTV6 project car presented the same scenario-the car sat undriven for 23 years. I assumed I was headed to Gas Tank Renu. My friend George(Alfa Vulcan on the BB) suggested we probe the tank's innards with his boroscope. We did and to our surprise the tank walls were pristine. Someone had the good sense the drain the tank when it was put up. Boroscopes-the flexible wand with a camera on the end are really handy and they don't cost much. A slow methodical search with the boroscope should quickly reveal the presence of scale, rust, etc.We didn't even remove the tank from the car.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,598 Posts
Discussion Starter · #39 ·
Thanks Jim. We have a borescope at work that I can borrow. Will do the inspection before I pull the tank. I am suspecting it was put away full - fuel was dripping from the outlet of the front filter, and that is pretty high. Full or empty is better than half full (hopeful thinking) Worst comes to worst we have Speedway Motors in town and I'll figure out a fuel cell.

I had hoped to drain the fuel using the electric pump under the car, but now it looks to be a messier gravity drain. Oh well.

My Pat Braden book indicates that the earlier fuel pumps might be serviceable. ?? I'll have to get it out and see. I've been able to get the Bosch pumps working by banging with a rock (literally) and by reversing polarity. Neither is a permanent solution, but were good enough to make it run. Then we can deal with longer term questions.

I blew the wad at Centerline today. $140 for fuel filters, Spica belt, Spica oil filter and gasket and a clutch master cylinder. Time is my limiting factor right now. :(
 
21 - 40 of 137 Posts
Top