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What would you estimate the prices of the us spec 69, 71, and 72 1750 Spiders be in 30 years and a 1986 Alfa Romeo Spider Veloce champagne gold and an 87 Spider Veloce maroon colored supposedly only 30 painted that color would that be the holy grail of S3's in the future?
 

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What would you estimate the prices of the us spec 69, 71, and 72 1750 Spiders be in 30 years and a 1986 Alfa Romeo Spider Veloce champagne gold and an 87 Spider Veloce maroon colored supposedly only 30 painted that color would that be the holy grail of S3's in the future?
Hold on a sec...



I have a Veloce Champagne Gold :grin2:

But I have a hard time believing the color will make it valuable. It certainly makes it look more 80's, but not a timeless classic if you ask me. In general, it makes sense that S3 spiders will get more valuable as ones in good condition become more rare- especially if Fiat successfully executes Alfa's come back strategy and the marque becomes more widely known in the U.S. Unlikely that they will become six figure collectibles, but they could eventually end up where GTVs are now.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
Hold on a sec...



I have a Veloce Champagne Gold :grin2:

But I have a hard time believing the color will make it valuable. It certainly makes it look more 80's, but not a timeless classic if you ask me. In general, it makes sense that S3 spiders will get more valuable as ones in good condition become more rare- especially if Fiat successfully executes Alfa's come back strategy and the marque becomes more widely known in the U.S. Unlikely that they will become six figure collectibles, but they could eventually end up where GTVs are now.
I've heard the gold alfas are a lesser common color but not rare. I have a feeling that the same thing might happen to Alfas just like 911s in the 90's the rusted early 911s no one cared about and said it ain't worth anything but now look at the prices but s3s won't go up that high. But the "Tequiu Sunrise" car from the movie is a 1987 Alfa Romeo spider that's burgundy they only made 30 in that color supposedly due to a paint maker strike in Italy and couldn't get enough paint so that car in the movie only 30 in that color and the movie value that car and the other 30 cars in that color will be the holy grail of the S3 they will be more valuable maybe and the pretty Aqua blue S3's thats a very pretty color and not very common
 

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It's possible, but I kind of doubt it. On the other hand, GTV6's are starting to climb in value, but Milanos probably never will. You're better off investing in a early 70's spider or GTV about 10 years ago.
 

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Creating a boundless enthusiasm just because there were few made in a certain color is unlikely to be unrewarding.

S3s were not really pure nor successful cars. Maybe the last one running in 50 years will be worth something to a rich Chinese collector. Your lifetime? Nah.
 

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I fully plan on being here in 50 years. By that time, who knows? It coud be a rich investor from Zanzibar paying top dollar for the last internal combustion car left :)
 

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I was first learning to drive 50 years ago in Houston. There was fewer than 900,000 people in the entire metro area. A nice MGA would cost $300. A few years later I turned down the purchase of a couple of 1900 CSS cars for $500 each. A nice drivable 65 Sprint GT cost me $500. I let my parents take my 56 Ford Fairline with T-Bird interceptor engine to the junk yard cuz it had a little rattle from the engine. Car had 56,000 miles on it, most by the first owner, my grandmother, who gave it to me.

So, who's to know the future? I was sure wrong on the 1900s. Maybe an S3 will look better with age.
 

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I was first learning to drive 50 years ago in Houston. There was fewer than 900,000 people in the entire metro area. A nice MGA would cost $300. A few years later I turned down the purchase of a couple of 1900 CSS cars for $500 each. A nice drivable 65 Sprint GT cost me $500. I let my parents take my 56 Ford Fairline with T-Bird interceptor engine to the junk yard cuz it had a little rattle from the engine. Car had 56,000 miles on it, most by the first owner, my grandmother, who gave it to me.

So, who's to know the future? I was sure wrong on the 1900s. Maybe an S3 will look better with age.
I would disagree with you that S3s were not successful. The addition of EFI made them the first relatively reliable Alfa and clawed back some of the lost horses from the emissions gremlins. Yes, the plastic duck tail is not the best integrated, but it gives it a bit of flair that I think will be appreciated in the years to come. I get positive comments almost every time I drive it- more than any other car I have ever driven. For many years, they have been the cheapest and most common Alfas you could by. To some extent, I think it's a case of "familiarity breeds contempt". In another decade, well sorted ones will be fairly rare birds, and I think the market will begin to appreciate it.
 

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My comment about "successful" is related to their being an excessively modified form of a previously good design. The original carbureted 105's were quite reliable, light, quick, and comfortable. The 1750 was still a pure evolution, and I was always happy with the reliability and performance of the Spica. They were still reasonably light, and uncluttered designs. Then things started to be done in response to rapidly changing safety and emission regulations. Ride height, bumper mass/ugliness, cushier and heavier interiors. They became an amalgamation of compromises, losing the purity and elegance of their original design.

Other cars from that period suffered similar fates. Alfa did what they could within restricted financing. I enjoyed owning an S3 Quad for a while, but they were the blunted end of a once-sharp stick. The S4 was at least an honest effort to embrace the "touring" nature that the car had become, shedding the add-on engineering, cleaning it up, and accepting that comfort was now more important than quickness.

If someone would like to have a fun, open, sporty car for small money (comparatively speaking), a well sorted S3 is a good choice today. Still, they are not "great" cars compared to many others made by Alfa, and others. If I'm betting my cash on long term appreciation, I prefer a best-in-class design, made in very limited numbers. These two elements are always a good guide for investing in anything... Art, coins, cars, airplanes, houses, etc.
 
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Regardless of the calander date, the value of all collector cars will ALWAYS be based on CONDITION, CONDITION, CONDITION. Everything else will be secondary.
 

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Discussion Starter #12
My comment about "successful" is related to their being an excessively modified form of a previously good design. The original carbureted 105's were quite reliable, light, quick, and comfortable. The 1750 was still a pure evolution, and I was always happy with the reliability and performance of the Spica. They were still reasonably light, and uncluttered designs. Then things started to be done in response to rapidly changing safety and emission regulations. Ride height, bumper mass/ugliness, cushier and heavier interiors. They became an amalgamation of compromises, losing the purity and elegance of their original design.

Other cars from that period suffered similar fates. Alfa did what they could within restricted financing. I enjoyed owning an S3 Quad for a while, but they were the blunted end of a once-sharp stick. The S4 was at least an honest effort to embrace the "touring" nature that the car had become, shedding the add-on engineering, cleaning it up, and accepting that comfort was now more important than quickness.

If someone would like to have a fun, open, sporty car for small money (comparatively speaking), a well sorted S3 is a good choice today. Still, they are not "great" cars compared to many others made by Alfa, and others. If I'm betting my cash on long term appreciation, I prefer a best-in-class design, made in very limited numbers. These two elements are always a good guide for investing in anything... Art, coins, cars, airplanes, houses, etc.
I like the S4 looks when it's up on a car lift it looks like a duetto the way the bumper is designed but I think that alfa needed some people like it and some don't but you can't live in the past you must move on and redesign I don't mind the looks of the S3 it's even better with the low profile zender spoiler that centerline also sells it blends in pretty well and fits in with the low profile it has hopefully someone could figure out a way for the front bumper specifically the nose that sticks out you put a s2 grill on it with some metal work I've seen it done to a S2A where they just cut out the middle of the bumper and placed S2 grill in the center I've would've gone and put the early 70's bumpers in place with a metal work there it would work out very nicely on that even though they extended the wheel wells one side
 

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Discussion Starter #13
Regardless of the calander date, the value of all collector cars will ALWAYS be based on CONDITION, CONDITION, CONDITION. Everything else will be secondary.
It would still be hard to find a clean alfa in 20-30 years or more also causing clean alfas values to sky rocket in the future most likely and hopefully
 

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Regardless of the calander date, the value of all collector cars will ALWAYS be based on CONDITION, CONDITION, CONDITION. Everything else will be secondary.
That's true of all used cars, really.

In the end it's supply and demand. Everyone wants a car in pristine condition. The supply of pristine condition cars drops as cars age.
 

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What would you estimate the prices of the us spec 69, 71, and 72 1750 Spiders be in 30 years and a 1986 Alfa Romeo Spider Veloce champagne gold and an 87 Spider Veloce maroon colored supposedly only 30 painted that color would that be the holy grail of S3's in the future?
Alfa painted more then 30 gold spiders. But it was a one year only color 1986. I now have 2 of them.

On the 87 maroon colored spiders. There were around 30 cars painted that color. My mother bought a new one in 1987 from Paul Spruell in the late spring of 1988. I was with her and she was told that only 30 or so were painted that color because of the painters union strike in Italy. The interesting note on her car is that the car had around 250 miles on it. It was not a demo as the warranty started the day she bought it. Not the in service date as it is with demos. They also disclosed that the engine hood had been repainted because of scratches it received from being used in a movie. Several months later I figured out which movie. Can I prove any of this. No. But I still have the car and it makes a good story.

On the other side of the supposed paint color. It could also have been so few painted maroon as the 1987 model years had to have a certain percented of cars with an SRS system. i.e. the dread electric seat belts. Which my mothers had and never worked right. Which is why you see fewer 1987 spiders then 86's or 88's. If you imported cars under a certain amount you didn't have to comply with the SRS rules. Which is why alfa sold less cars year after year after their high point in sales in 1986.

As far as values. Yes they will go up. Will they ever be worth the numbers the 50's and 60's bring. Maybe. But by that time the earlier cars will be bringing current Montreal numbers and the dollar will be worth much much less then today.
 

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Driver driven cars could be outlawed by then, in which case you better have a long driveway to play on.

That would drive down values.
Meh... I somewhat doubt it. Perhaps Interstates and certain designated high-traffic roads will get to that point, but technology has a LONG way to go before driverless cars are ready for prime time in city driving. It's not well publicized, but the google cars can only travel on previously mapped routs and cannot drive in even mildly bad weather (i.e. a bit of rain will shut them down). They also can't distinguish between a very dangerous obstacle in the road (giant hunk of metal) and a paper bag. Even Elon Musk admits that there are a lot of problems to solve for city driving.

But even if they were to ban cars with drivers, Alfas make great track cars.
 

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Series 3 differences

Getting back to the question of future values of Spiders series 3 (1982/3-1990), a more relevant question is, which years are significant in the evolution of the spider. We can't accurately predict future values, so its worthwhile to at least be informed about the significant differences between the years. I am no expert, so my question is, are there any more significant differences other than paint, beyond what I have listed below? I assume there are.
1. 1982 - last year of series 2 body, but first year with Bosch L-Jetronic injection and electrics.
2. 1985 - last year of old style interior, dash nacelle.
3. 1990 - last year of series 3 body, first year of Bosch Motronic and good exhaust manifold. Last year of manual steering?

These appear to be the significant differences (other than condition and history) to consider for acquiring an S3. I'd like to acquire a good S3 while a good one can still had relatively cheap, to include in a 4 spider family. I am astonished by the differences between my 1982 S2A and my 1993 S4. They drive like they are 30 years apart, not 11. I hope to add an early coveted S2 soon, which will likely cost $$.
 

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Discussion Starter #20
Maybe the early 1986 spiders the first year of solid plastic but the early 86's still had the rubber spoiler. But the next question is are the euro or American 82's worth more in Europe they still had the stainless bumpers like 71,72 until 82 because they didn't have 5 mph safety standards while we had the big rubber bumpers.
 
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