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Discussion Starter #1
Hi, I have been looking at a couple of Giulietta to buy for my daughter.
She is driving an automatic mazda 121 for a couple of years and wants to learn to drive manual.
They are cheap and is there anything I should careful of, except for rust of course ? Basically same as Alfetta GTV ?
Seems like a good first Alfa for a keen novice ! Any thoughts or suggestions. Cheers - fgtcar
 

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They are as good as any transaxle, so they are very good cars. I would buy one as a daily driver if I could find one. As you say, rust is the issue. In SA the boot lids rusted so badly it was possible to buy a fibre-glass replacement. Bit harder for ladies to park due to the high bootline hindering rear vision.
 

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My brother swore by his. It was a 2.0 a very nice car until some silly girl pulled out infront of him and wrote it off. Had a 75 TS after and said it wasnt close to comparing. I beg to differ these days :p
 

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Thanks for replies. The one I will be seeing next weekend has rust in trunk floor where towbar attaches, under screen edges(can't be that hard to remove/replace a windscreen) and in rh sill. Described to be mechanically very good, clean and tight car, immaculate interior with straight panels and good paint otherwise.
We'll see how extenstive the rust actually is. Boot lid, bonnet, fenders and doors are supposed to be rust free.

Some of the others I have seen where like "rust holding hands", so keeping my hopes up. :confused::rolleyes:
 

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My 79 Alfetta sedan had plenty of rust under the windscreens, which wasn't revealed until the screens were out - the two times that I had it into the bodyworks (in 10 years of ownership - '85-'95) to have rust removed. There wasn't much rust anywhere else, apart from several small bubbles around the wheel arches where stones had removed the paint, and in one or two other panels, but under the screens it was quite extensive, on both occasions I had the rust removed.

Your daughter will certainly learn about changing gears in a Giulietta - if she can change gears in a transaxle Alfa, she can do it in anything! She might do a bit of "porridge stirring" and the occasional gear crunching for a while, though!:D I had to have the second gear synchro replaced on my Alfetta soon after I got it, although seeing as it was still good and strong years later when I sold it, after many more kilometres than he'd done, I suspect that the doctor who was first owner before me didn't have much of a "bedside manner" with Alfetta gearboxes, and had been a bit impatient changing down into second gear!:mad: He probably drives an automatic these days.

-Don
 

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I'll add my thoughts from Alfetta ownership many years ago.

As mentioned earlier, the gearshift can be an issue along with the syncros making the change from first to second a leisurely and sometimes noisy affair. It disturbs drivers of Japanese cars. I understand the gear shift can be fixed to make it almost normal.

Electrics are not a strong point. If there are weird electrical problems consider getting the car checked out by an auto electrician before committing.

Check the handbrake. Sometimes the rear calipers stick, leak or otherwise don't work. Ensure this works OK or be prepared to get it fixed. The brakes are inboard at the rear and the handbrake is not adjusted like any other car.

Check the rubber donuts in the driveshaft. These crack and explode as they get older. Best you get them sorted straight away if there is a hint of a problem.

Ensure the shockies are OK or replace them. Alfetta's/Guilettas are mongrel things if the shockies are worn or if the suspension is otherwise not spot on. Likewise, decent tires and a proper wheel alignment can make all the different to the driving experience as well.

Other than these things, these cars are fairly robust and good to drive. My wife however never enjoyed driving our Alfetta (sedan) but loved the 33 so check the car is a fit with the intended driver.
 

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I`d agree with Keith about checking the car out with the intended driver the transaxle cars are quirkier than most and I`ve seen many a car bought for a son or daughter that was really for Dad, that led to a desperate sale and money being lost.
They are great cars if you like them (they tend to polarize people) but do get those driveshaft doughnuts checked. Rust is usually obvious. In my opinion having owned 5 Giuliettas-1.8`s & 2litres the 1.8 is the nicer car. Nobody has mentioned rust around the window surrounds on the doors, the most common rust area and a good clue to the rest of the car.

Richard J
`65 Giulia Ti, `69 GT Junior, `74 GTV 2000, `76 Alfetta GTV, `77 Alfetta GTV, `81 Alfasud Ti, `84 GTV6, `90 164
 

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I passed on an '83 Giulietta 2.0 in Montreal a few years ago, still regret it to this day. It was rust free with only 40K miles on the clock!! I think the 2.0 up front is a better balance than the 2.5/3L V6 cars, albiet a bit less power.
 
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