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The best known Sportiva cars are of course the red and the silver coupe. The silver car on our photos is the car located in the Arese museum, the red coupe was traded by the museum for one of the first Alfas ever built. It was on the cover of Classic & Sportscar August 1988.
Beside these two coupes there were some more cars:


It will be interesting to find out what version had its own chassis and what version was a development on an existing frame...

And I am always unsure which of these spider we count as Sportiva?:confused:




Best regards
Ciao Carlo:cool:
 

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Discussion Starter #4
Hej Carlo.
Excuse me I if I provoked you-
My impression ( first picture) is that they are only design sketches. Buy I find it interesting the concern, they had, about the air flow around the front wheel

Second picture must be 750 Competizione. Designed by Boano on a chassis build and designed by Abarth. The engine geometry, I think is interesting. As Alfa returned to a long stroke, where Giulietta was 75x75

The third picture is the Sportiva by Scaglioni/Bertone
 

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Hej Carlo.
Excuse me I if I provoked you-
Not at all!!!;)

I just thought that the Sportiva cars deserve a thread of their own!
Further I think there is still a lot to learn about them.

My impression ( first picture) is that they are only design sketches
Here is my argument....:p



And I think this article from Thoroughbred & Classic Cars July 1986 deserves attention as well. I would be interested at this point to hear John's opinion about the cars and their chassis numbers. Were indeed just four cars built in total?
I have strong doubts about this since a long time, maybe we'll find out here if I'm right - or wrong of course;)



Best regards
Ciao Carlo:cool:
 

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I believe the two coupes in the Rens Biesma drawing from Het K are the same chassis. I believe that trhere were 2 Sportiva spiders, as per the 2 lower drawings by Biesma.

As to the photos in post #3, I believe the upper spider is one of the TWO 750 competizione cars built, and not a Sportiva spider.
 

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Spotivas

Not being an expert but interested party, Please make it clear to your best knowledge:

There is a red Sportiva and a Silver Sportiva. Correct?

Are there any other Sportivas? How Many?

I'm just confused but I appreciate your help.
 

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The silver car came from Sydney, one of 2 in existence( I think) Its RHD was swapped for another Alfa from the Museum , owner was Lionel ..........?
 

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Not being an expert but interested party, Please make it clear to your best knowledge:

There is a red Sportiva and a Silver Sportiva. Correct?

Are there any other Sportivas? How Many?

I'm just confused but I appreciate your help.
There seems to be a red Sportiva coupe (private collection), a silver Sportiva coupe (Alfa museum) and at least one Sportiva Spider (Alfa museum, see this thread).
 

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One little correction to make:

Carlo stated the red coupe was traded by the Museo for one of the first Alfa's ever built, but in fact it was for the earliest car the Museum knew of Nicola Romeo's name, so actually one of the first Alfa Romeos ever made.

And yes, common understanding is that 2 coupes and 2 spiders were made, but only 2 coupes and 1 spider still exist. But nobody knows for sure.
 

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2000 Sport & Sportiva

I have seen a couple of these cars personally on more than one occasion but have never gotten intimate with one so as to inspect any of its innards. I did see a very special engine awaiting a rebuild in the 1980's. From data collected to date ... during my general study of these cars, begun in earnest around 1980:

Three cars are known today bearing the chassis numbers 00002, 00003, and 00004. The numbering makes them part of the same "series" and these numbers strongly imply the existence of a car numbered 00001. There is no documentation I've seen (yet) to such a car listing it by chassis number. Then again, I've not made it a specific study and there may well be documents remaining at Alfa Romeo describing the four(?) cars more than adequately? There is use history for (and a few published photos of) a car that probably is the car that was numbered "00001". It was raced by Sanesi on the Vermicino - Rocca di Papa (edit: NOT Pontedecimo - Giovi) hill-climb during May of 1955. A photo appears on page 150 of the book about the history of that hillclimb event.

Two open cars, 00001(?) and 00002, appear to have been known generally (if early on?) as "2000 Sport" even though "1900" was used as part of the chassis number prefix of the one car that is known today. It is possible that the chassis of 00001(?) was used to build one of the "Sportiva" coupe examples that exist today as "00003" and "00004"? These two cars have been reported as having slight variations in the prefix designation of the chassis number but also incorporate "1900" as part of each number. The chassis re-use possibility is only a POSSIBILITY. I am not promoting it as "fact". In the end it may not seem terribly important to describe this small grouping of cars down to such detail? The impact of the series was more generic from a marketing standpoint than it was specific to each car's individual significance. It may not matter (?) ... until someone offers you chassis "00001" ... perhaps out of Italy or Belgium or another corner of the world where someone believes there is a sucker born every 12 nanoseconds. Perhaps I should acknowledge that there has never been any indication (I am aware of) that there was a chassis "00005" built ... but I am sure that there are some who'd be pleased to build one for you. Or for someone else who'd like to sell it to you. There certainly are a number of wanna-be "Disco Volante" cars awaiting gullible buyers! There's nothing wrong with those sorts of fantasy-fulfillment toys, but they do distract us from the study of actual history when spurious claims are made about their origins.

As with the various derivative cars that were quickly known and promoted as "Disco Volante" (even though the term was supposedly intended to be rather excusive at the beginning) the "Sportiva" term has become applied to a few cars that were perhaps not intended to carry that name?

In a pure sense, it may be "most accurate"(?) to say that there were two examples of the "2000 Sport" (a.k.a. "1900 Sportiva spider" ... and variations on that sort of name use in the press) and that there were two "Sportiva" examples as well? Historical references can certainly be found and promoted to make this seem evident. But then, there are inconsistencies in usage that can also be found and one can choose to interpret the promotional wording and editorial mistakes(?) in other ways.

In the end, all these cars became promotional tools for the marketing of Alfa Romeo 1900 and Alfa Romeo 2000 production cars that sometimes shared not much more than some portion of their model name designations ... and it seems that the popular name usage morphed a bit with the changeover from Alfa Romeo's production of the 1900 into the 2000.

I'm sure that there will be those who disagree with my interpretation of the data. But then, we are discussing very few cars that had almost no individual significant use history. Yes, they are lovely. Yes, they are inspirational in pleasant ways. They are certainly quite excusive! If there were ideas for these cars to be something more as they were being built, it seems those ideas were quickly abandoned in favor of using them as marketing tools. if not, they would have become less exclusive and perhaps just a bit less fascinating to us?

John
 
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