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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
Wondering if anyone on the Alfa Bulletin Board would know where I could
source an Alfa Catalogue that would cross index the transmission # to a year and model of alfa. As I heard that some of the 5 speed transmission have different gear ratios to do whether they were 1600 or 1750 or 2000 and the type of car they were installed in.

These transmissions have full bell housing so they are the hydraulic clutch type and not the mech. type with the open lower metal cover etc. They are not from the later years as these transmission do not have any mounting for crank sensors on the bellhousing.

I came across someone who has 3 - 5 speed transmissions but he does not know what model of car they came from and I was looking for a spare for my 1971 - 1750 GTV 10544 or 10551 model cars. Any help in finding out any transmission #'s or sources for them would much appreciated.
 

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I'll jump in on this one but fully expect to be corrected on some points. I don't think that there is any difference in transmission gear ratios between 1600, 1750 and 2L cars, at least on U.S. cars. The 1300 Jr. is the one with a different 5th gear, 0.86, I believe. We didn't get that car in the U.S. but you guys in Canada did. If you plan to use your car on the track you may prefer the shorter gear of the 1300. It would cut down slightly on your top cruising speed though.

Another thing to look for is the "long rod" vs. "short rod" version. The long shift rods protrude through the bell housing when engaged in 2nd, 4th or reverse and the one for reverse engages a pivoting lever which in turn engages the reverse light switch. The short engagement rods (which replaced the long rod version around '72) don't protrude through the bell and the reverse light switch screws into the housing right in front of the reverse rod. As long as you have the correct version of bellhousing to go with the transmission, you could use either version with your car. Your original would be the long rod version but most people prefer the short rod version - less oil leaking into the bellhousing, more needle bearings, etc.

I don't know what exterior numbers correspond to which transmission but the transmission cases are different between the two types as the short rods no longer needed a casting for the o-rings. You should be able to tell what he has by looking into the bellhousing for the reverse switch location and by counting the input to output turns ratio. Send us some pictures if you're not certain.

By the way, this info pertains to hydraulic clutch bells and trannies. The "push to reverse" sticks and non-moly syncros of the the earlier transmissions are a whole nuther can of worms.
 

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I came across someone who has 3 - 5 speed transmissions but he does not know what model of car they came from and I was looking for a spare for my 1971 - 1750 GTV 10544 or 10551 model cars. Any help in finding out any transmission #'s or sources for them would much appreciated.
Bill S offers good advice above.

But, without seeing those 3 transmissions, I can't tell you what model Alfa they came from, or whether they'd fit your 1750. If you can report where the reverse light switch is located, we can narrow things down. What Bill S describes as the "long rod type" is what you want - so look for a reverse light switch behind where the clutch pressure plate would go.

In the end, pretty much any Alfa transmissions can be made to work with any engine/body - some combinations just take more work. Even if those mystery transmissions are the "short rod type", the conversion could be as simple as extending the wiring for the back-up light switch from the bellhousing to the shift tower.
 

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I have switched back and forth between long rod and short rod gearboxes in my spider. As Biil and Jay said,there is no problem provided you install the correct bellhousing. There was no need to extend the wiring on my car. The long rod bellhousing has the reverse switch mounted on a bracket inside the bellhousing and the wires go through a hole that is in about the same place as on a short rod bellhousing.
I have a useable/rebuildable long rod gearbox and bellhousing if that is what you need.
 

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Discussion Starter #5 (Edited)
Alfa GT Veloce 1750 Transmission

Thanks to the the Board members with there good knowledge and experience about these fine appraised sports cars. I will investigate the transmission further and update the Board on the location of the reverse switch and whether the tranny has long or short rods.
 

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1750 trans

The 2l gearbox came w/ upgraded bearings for extra HP. Not all long rod trans have these.For sure the short rod trans do.If you have upgraded your HP, then go for a short rod trans.
 

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Discussion Starter #7
1750 Transmission

I'll jump in on this one but fully expect to be corrected on some points. I don't think that there is any difference in transmission gear ratios between 1600, 1750 and 2L cars, at least on U.S. cars. The 1300 Jr. is the one with a different 5th gear, 0.86, I believe. We didn't get that car in the U.S. but you guys in Canada did. If you plan to use your car on the track you may prefer the shorter gear of the 1300. It would cut down slightly on your top cruising speed though.

Another thing to look for is the "long rod" vs. "short rod" version. The long shift rods protrude through the bell housing when engaged in 2nd, 4th or reverse and the one for reverse engages a pivoting lever which in turn engages the reverse light switch. The short engagement rods (which replaced the long rod version around '72) don't protrude through the bell and the reverse light switch screws into the housing right in front of the reverse rod. As long as you have the correct version of bellhousing to go with the transmission, you could use either version with your car. Your original would be the long rod version but most people prefer the short rod version - less oil leaking into the bellhousing, more needle bearings, etc.

I don't know what exterior numbers correspond to which transmission but the transmission cases are different between the two types as the short rods no longer needed a casting for the o-rings. You should be able to tell what he has by looking into the bellhousing for the reverse switch location and by counting the input to output turns ratio. Send us some pictures if you're not certain.

By the way, this info pertains to hydraulic clutch bells and trannies. The "push to reverse" sticks and non-moly syncros of the the earlier transmissions are a whole nuther can of worms.

To, Bill S

Thanks so much to you Bill and the other ABB members for there valuable advice and experience regarding knowing the particulars about Alfa transmissions. So what I found was of the 3 transmissions this person had only one was the long rod type and the other 2 were short rod with no special crank sensors so the short rod type are likely from 1972 to 1974 for gtv, and maybe a few more years for the spider. Since they came quite cheap I bought one of each. If I get a chance I will try to take some pictures of the the 2 transmissions so that other board members can access this info for future knowledge. Thanks again, to all of you.
 
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