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After years of owning 164 manuals I have finally had a clutch master cylinder go on me from a recent purchase, maybe I have just been lucky? What is the average life of a 164 master cylinder?

Please note the 164 I have replaced the master cylinder on is a right hand drive 12 valve, after reading thru a few different sites and looking at the 164 workshop manual it appears the slave is also known as the master and the master the pump, but when I refer to them the unit up top at the pedal is the master and the unit on the transmission is the slave, that is what I have always known them as on the GTV6, 90 and 75 model units

Apparently left hand drive units are located on the interior side of the 164 and the master cylinder is a totally different unit from the right hand drive unit, not interchanable, I used a second hand master I had in stock removed from another 164 but apparently the right hand drive version is hard to source, I had a look around and could not find any brand new ones, Jason's Alfissimo store does not have any listed but does have a rebuild kit available for the right hand drive version, are brand new right hand drive masters available from anywhere you know of Jason?

To sum it up, jack 164 up, remove right hand wheel, remove fender liners, I have found it better for frequent removal to cut the fenders back a bit, not making them such a tight fit, they can be a time consuming effort to replace as they are, you may be able to remove the master cylinder as is, but room is tight and you risk rounding the head nut on the exit line, it's a world of pain, I found it best to remove the power steering pump, once removed the area is open and access easy, actually with the engine in situ, once you remove the power steering pump it's amazing how much area it opens up as you can see from my attached photos, steering rack bolts, starter motor, you need to remove five bolts to remove the power steering pump and to access one of them you need to remove the top hose connection, I found it best to remove both connections just to get the pump out of the way, you can catch and reuse the power steering fluid or replace, some new power steering fluid should not hurt the system, also a good time to replace the oil filter as I did while access is so easy, I used a K & N unit from Riverside in the United States, is that where they are really made? Apparently this filter is rated to engines up to 8000 horse power 馃榾, also has the handy nut on the end, which I believe are original to the Alfa Romeo filters?

Remove exit line head nut, 12mm, I made a special tool for this, disconnect pedal linkage, remove dust cover, remove attachment nuts and reverse procedure and bleed, with no breaks, first time, I would allow one and half hours not including the bleeding, if your having clutch hydraulic problems it's always a lot easier to check the slave first due to location on right hand drive models, in my case both appeared to be on the way out, master had a leak and slave a leak.



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I suggest you edit your first post of this thread and insert RHD in title and recopy title and paste it on top of text in body of post.

Did you still have to remove driver's seat to lay on your back to unhook m/c piston clevis pin from clutch pedal?
 

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I meant to put right hand drive in the title, must have missed it, I meant to make this a great reference for anyone wanting to complete a right hand drive replacement themselves

No seat removal, Recaro seat, put it back as far as it goes, kneel down, twist body to side, 164 was jacked up to chest height 馃槉

Found the clevis pin quite low and easy to access compared to a GTV6, 90, 75 model unit


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Hello.

*Alfa Romeo 164 RHD clutch master compatibility*

Good news! The alfa romeo 164 RHD and 166 clutch master pump are the exact same part!

I had a bad master on my RHD 164 TS and got a Delphi LM80243 clutch master which is originally made for the alfa 166 (not sure if LHD or RHD), and it turned out to be a perfect replacement! No modifications needed. Direct fit!

Thought I'd mention it because I've seen many posts where RHD owners have been seeking assistance with sourcing a replacement for their RHD 164s.

My original clutch master part number: Benditalia 1421983

Replacement part: Delphi LM80243

Other brands:
Bosch- 21983
TRW-PND246
Alfa Romeo - 60815343
LPR- LPR2122
Brembo - C23008

Hope this information helps RHD owners with clutch master problems!
 

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I noticed hydraulic oil level (brake/clutch) drop slightly over a few weeks. I knew it was a minor leak though, because of the gradual decline over time, but obviously I had to find and fix it. Looked around and figured out the new 166 clutch master I installed about 6 months ago was starting to slowly leak through the rubber boot.

I hated the idea of having to remove the right wheel, fender liner, clutch lines etc to get the master cylinder out to just fix the leak. Nevertheless, I had to get it done before I loose clutch control while driving.
I took a good look at the system and decided I was going to overhaul the clutch seals WITHOUT removing the clutch master from the car.

I drained the system as much as I could using a syringe and hose. Removed the clevis pin. Removed the rubber boot and c-clip. Out popped the piston and a bit of oil that I quickly dried up with a rag. I managed to get some Brembo seals from the local parts market. The spring was good, so I didn't have to change that. Just replaced the two seals and put everything back. (making sure to oil the seals and apply grease at the neck of the master cylinder)
I was working alone, with no one to assist with bleeding the system, so I reverse fed the clutch line with new hydraulic oil using the syringe and hose. It was super easy, with absolutely no need for pumping/bleeding the system.

I hope this helps RHD owners looking to rebuild a leaking clutch master. It can be done without any assistance in less than an hour, without almost any hassle or even having to take off the clutch master. The only bit of 'hassle' I had to face was putting back in the c-clip during re-assembly. It wasn't difficult at all, though.
 

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I bought a LHD TRW clutch master by mistake for my RHD car, difference is the hydraulic output location. Decided to change the internal seals and made the mistake of only changing the outer one - which stopped any signs of weeping. The original inner one seems to have become damaged in the process and going to have to open it all up again to change that too. I didn't initially as wasn't convinced it was the same size as original - no need for it to be, beyond the outer diameter.
Being stupid aside, this is definitely the easiest way to go. Circlip wise, I found it easy putting it back on but a very naughty dog in terms of getting it off. Hard to get the right light on the area and pedfals get in the way of circlip pliars - ended up buying different sized ones to help.
Like the idea of reverse bleeding. Bought a new slave, as dead easy to swap over, and drilled through a spare bleed nipple, so could tighten it up and still leave a central hole for fluid to pass through, to aid sucking through new fluid without just sucking air from the sides/thread. Once bled to that point, swapping in the standard nipple loses so little fluid it only takes a moment to clear it.
 
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