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Many of us here have had our Alfas serviced at Alfa of Tacoma, and Carlo and Lino's knowledge and service have approached legendary status among northwest Italian car fans.

This may not be news for anyone "in the know" but it was to me:

I stopped by the shop a couple of Saturdays ago, and although they're not technically open on Saturdays, I was hoping to at least make an appointment to get some exhaust work done on my Spider.

The fellow I talked to mentioned that the brothers are retiring very soon, and not really taking on any new business. They're apparently finishing up the cars that are already in the shop, and according to the nice guy I talked to (sorry, I didn't catch his name), the shop will probably close when they're done.

Sad day, but much thanks for all the good work they've done.

Ciao!
 

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Uh oh. Carlo has done work on my Alfas since the late 60's. Going to have to make sure I don't need anything soon in my cars. I knew the day would arrive some day in the future, and it's been a great run, but hate to think of anyone else touching my Alfas.
 

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i was visiting from NYC on business and decided to stop by the shop since i heard a lot of good things about them.

hopefully someone in the area can buy the shop and keep it going.
 

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More than you would ever believe!

Wow! What a treasure trove. Bet there is mounds of cool artifacts in there.
Man! You have no idea! Few people have ever had the unbelievably marvelous experience of being allowed into the basement of their establishment. I am certain there are cars and parts in there that even Carlo and Lino no longer recall. Periodically we hear of a particular car being again found there that someone in the NWARC now drives.

What seems one of the sad aspects of the return of Alfa Romeo to this area is that neither of the predecessors and continuing long time supporters of the club were given dealerships. Neither Alfa Romeo of Tacoma (not the "new" Fiat and Alfa of Tacoma, the new Alfa dealer nor Ferrari of Seattle (the old Alfa Romeo of Bellevue who took over Grand Prix motors -- i.e. Pasquale and his son) were given dealerships. It seems that Fiat first demanded that they agree to be Fiat dealers first to later get a new Alfa dealership. That would be terribly hard for a shop already doing Ferrari and Masarati in large and comfortable volume.

But Alfa runs things its own strange way. Rumor has it that Alfa teamed with a little lightbulb company in Japan to develop a new spider to replace the one Alfa provided from 1974 to 1994, but suddenly abandoned it to Mazda because of a desire to compete head on with Lexus. The result -- the 164 which was indeed wonderful, but which they also tried to sell in huge volume through Chrysler dealers also. But they could not fix them when brought back on breakdowns while in warranty. Consequently, that car brought Alfa the reputation as the very worst of cars and caused it to leave the American market since 1995. But Mazda ended up producing and selling the most convertibles -- the Miata -- that any other manufacturer EVER.

And remember how the literature was that Alfa was going to combine with Mazda to come out with a new convertible. Nope -- turned it over to Mazda agan. Alfa did show a 4C type convertible but where is it? And according to the most recent info (as per last night's monthly meeting of the club) the cost of the new Giulietta Quadrifoglio (i.e. expensive sedan) the cost will be in the $85,000 range or more depending if the company can get it accepted by the powers that be (some 274 or so cars sitting without engine or running gear awaiting acceptance -- or did I hear that wrong?)

Well, I waited 20 years since 1995 to get a new Alfa. My wife says the 4C is like having to crawl into a bathtub while ducking under a lid to sit on the bottom (in a seat a bit narrow for her on the passenger seat), and in the driver seat sitting with legs lying on the bottom of the tub with the pedals at the drain location, and then to get out being forced to put one leg over the edge and dragging the other over so one can sit on the top edge of the tub (a totally "un-ladylike procedure in a dress). So it looks like I will never buy one of those 4C cars to "tool around" in. Nor could I now that I am retired and doing only pro-bono work ever afford the cost of a new Giulietta (if and when it is ever coming here -- Hah! 2016? At least that is better than the old "two years from now" that has been the pitch that kept me going the last 20 years).

So it seems I will have to be content with my old Alfas and drive them until I no longer can. I suspect many many other old guys have in life come to that conclusion. Seems that may be why old Alfa cars are never available until somebody dies and widows sell them in an estate sale. Bummer!

But, maybe Carlo and Lino might have a basement sale. Lot's of cool stuff down there. We must be sure to tell everybody if they do. Keep your eyeballs peeled and greasy.
 

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From 1987 to 2013 Mr Seeley Moore of Bremerton, WA had his 1987 Milano Gold purchased and serviced at Alfa of Tacoma. He sold the car at that time with 238K miles. It had one intermediate owner and one transport owner prior to my buying it two years ago with 240K miles. I have a log book from Mr Moore detailing his trips with the car, mileage, repairs and notes. The car is absolutely beautiful for a car with that mileage, indeed, it looks as if it has no more than about 75K on it, by and large. Mr Moore had placed and "Alfa Owner's" club decal in the upper left of the windshield. This led me to believe that Mr Moore was a truly exceptional owner, fastidious and careful. My question is whether anyone knew Seeley Moore and his '87 Milano, and what they could tell me about this obviously fine man. Feel free to reply here, or write to me directly.
 

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Great pictures. Alfa of Tacoma was everything in a repair shop that any Alfa owner could hope for. Always a clean and professional operation.

Carlo was the sole mechanic for all my DD Alfas since 1966 (met him in 64, lol, am I the longest continual customer still alive?). Never anyone else, and Lino was always able to find any part, regular or special, I ever needed/wanted. I'm pretty sad about it, but I always knew the day would someday arrive, alas. Hopefully, they will be able to continue taking care of them in the future somehow, somewhere.
 

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Hello Del,

Since you were a customer since 64, I'll just ask if by any chance you heard the name, or knew, Seeley Moore, who resided in Bremerton. He was likely in his 80s when he sold his 87 Milano Gold in 2013. Any basic profile or comments on Mr Moore would be welcome -- he drove the Milano 238K and the car still looks as if it has no more than 70K on it.

Chris Kox
SF CA
'63 Spider
'86 Spider Veloce
'87 Milano Gold
 

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No, sorry. Knew quite a few but that name doesn't ring a bell. Of course, lol, at my age...
 

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Seley Moore was a long time member of the Alfa community

I was fortunate to meet Seley Moore at many Northwest A.R.O.C. events from the 1980's. His wife, Lorna Moore, was President of the N.W.A.R.O.C. and A.R.O.C..
He had a Giulia Super among various Alfas over the years.

Below is a nice write up about the Moores by Fred Russell in the August, 2017 newsletter of the N.W.A.R.O.C.; please look it up with some photos.

" Last Saturday (July 29, 2017) family and friends gathered at the Bremerton Airport Diner for a very nice memorial for our former club members Lorna &
Seley Moore, while the Bremerton Sports Car Club provided a distant soundtrack of cars and people having fun. Seley passed away last April, while many of you may remember that Lorna died in 2002 after battling cancer. Both were very active members of our club, which is what you'd expect from two people who were passionate about each other and whatever they focused on... cars, jobs, school, politics, travel, geology and friends. Seley, one of a few boys from a Montana family, was quiet and never wasted words, though compared to his brothers and father, he was a chatterbox. He lived life as an engineer, thoroughly understanding the mechanics of whatever surrounded him. He attended the University of Idaho, getting his degree in Civil Engineering before moving around a bit while an officer in the US Navy. Eventually settling in Silverdale in Kitsap County, Seley ran for and won the position of Commissioner of the Silverdale Water District, and apparently did it well enough to get re-elected twice more. Lorna, born in Oregon in 1941, was one of four daughters born to Hugh and Marie Fountain. Lorna had
joked that her parents were both fountains and that the girls were little drips. Seley once said "When Lorna and her sisters get together, they talk so fast my ears can't keep up with them." Lorna married Seley in 1963 and started what turned out to be 39 years of perfect partnership. While in the Bay area, she joined the Naval Officer's Wives Club. It didn't take long for her to run for and become president of the club. Lorna had strong feelings on politics and worked to support candidates multiple times as campaign chair or other roles. Later in life, her activities led her to become chair of the Kitsap Republican Party "the party with the
values of Lincoln"... a group that could use her help again today. Both Seley and Lorna enjoyed Alfa Romeos and joined the Northwest Alfa Romeo Club, becoming very active with events and leadership. Drives, chili cookoffs, parties and national conventions were all key events for them. Following her passions and history, Lorna became our chapter president, then later became national president of AROC in the early 90s. The loss of Lorna was very hard on Seley, taking a toll on him and the family. After a few years he settled into a retirement home and enjoyed sharing stories of life, which included plenty of Alfa club tales. Family and friends each took turn sharing stories at the memorial on July 29th. Dan Jardine brought numerous photos from over the years, showing our many Alfa Romeo club events, our younger faces and happy Lorna & Seley Moore images. If you ever shared a driving event with the Moores, you'd learn a lot about the trees, terrain and history of what you passed, and I could almost hear the conversations in Dan's photos. There was also a display of elephant-themed jewelry that Lorna loved, as well as a memory board and an Alfa Romeo club cookbook. We had the newsletter from 1993 showing Lorna receiving the Alfista of the Year award, which you may know was renamed in her honor after her passing. The stories shared proved the wonderful impact they had on each other and those around them, and reminds us that the club is a wonderful extension of our family.
- Fred Russell"
 

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Very nice. Wish I had known him.
 
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