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Discussion Starter #41
From the catalogorapido (Short Spare parts) Catalogue
It appears that all the 2000 models had the LSD?
jonession:

Can you please email me a .pdf of that document. Never seen it before and your book or whatever this came from are not like the USA versions.

Thanks in advance.

Bud Feigel
Lexington, Kentucky 40503
[email protected]
 

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Thanks for the video. I had made a drop gauge setup to measure the backlash, but don't have a tool to clamp the ring gear. I'm getting 0.010"-0.012" which is about what it appears to be on the video, but I may be getting some error due to lack of clamping. Keep us posted if you made more videos and thanks.

Andy Amatruda
 

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There are only two axle assemblies that have been used in the Alfas - the smaller (and earlier) one was in the 1600's and most earlier cars (as far back as the 50's!), and was non-LSD. It used 8 mm bolts for the drive shaft flange.

The larger one appeared with the 2L cars in about 1972 or so as an LSD unit. It had larger axle tubes and larger diameter axle shafts with fewer splines, a different center casting, and larger R&P for the LSD parts. This one also had a larger diameter drive shaft, with special 9 mm hardened shoulder bolts coupling the rear U-joint flange with the Diff input flange. It also carried rear brake calipers that were the same external size as the earlier one but with larger diameter pistons.

However, the attachment of both of the axle assemblies to the car is identical. It's the easiest swap of Alfa parts on the car! The only significant issue is the larger diameter holes in the input flange for the 9 mm shoulder bolts. This can be accommodated by reaming the 8 mm holes in the drive shaft, swapping the later rear yoke of the rear U-joint (which is the same on all axles) that has the larger holes, or swapping in a later drive shaft.

The later drive shaft is also an easy swap, only requiring attention to the center bearing carrier, which changed after the 1600 series 1 cars. The bearing itself is unchanged however. The later drive shaft is larger and stronger, presumably to go with the higher power of the 2L engines. It fastens at the front to the same guibo on all cars. There were at least two different lengths of all the drive shafts - for the Sedan and the GTV/Spider. The earliest cars (Guilettas) had yet a different drive shaft.

Easy Peasy.

Robert
Excellent tech.

Scott
 

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green of blue

I have a 2 liter LSD axle sitting around. Trying to ID the ratio. No idea where it came from, Do you guys think this is the green or blue... Stared at it for a while and cannot decide....
 

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Got the rear diff disassembled in my 72 GT1300 - 4.56 ratio. Should be small rear diff, no LSD.

And ended up with complete 2L drivetrain from about the same year - it's a 512 block, 5 sp, 4.30 combo - assuming it's a 1972 GTV drivetrain. Should be the larger rear diff, but it's at the shop with the rest of my car and the small diff is here in my garage, so don't have them side by side to compare.

Scott
 

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Discussion Starter #50
I'd call that green. Take care of that "white" mark on the pinion flange and the end of the driveshaft. That's important too.
 

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Hi
I'm about to purchase a 1970 GTV 1750 Euro model from Japan.
Can some one may guess what ratio this car may come with.
Thx
 
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