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Discussion Starter #1
Hi Guys, I recently replaced the two front gearbox mounts on my 75 TS and noticed it is decidedly different on the left mount , I know they improved the gearlinkage system on the 75, so my question is two fold, can this system be retro fitted to my 1978 Alfetta sedan racecar(as this will help gearchanges)
If so , could someone please enlighten me on exactly which parts I need to make the changes, and if anybody overseas can supply me these pieces ,as we only have about 8 75's in the country so sourcing the parts locally is an impossibility.

Thanks in advance
 

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I dont know if there are any differences to how the linkage fits onto the box between the older and newer (isostatic) linkage, as you will have seen, part of it is fixed to the gearbox mount on the TS, so I would be presuming that is the 'change' and the connection at the box is the same, I may be wrong. AFAIK, the parts you would need would be the whole linkage. As it's for your race car, I would suggest you get in contact with Alex Jupe Motorsport in th UK, they rebuild isostatic linkages into a quikshift, but may well be able to supply you with a whole system to bolt on, although I know that they very much prefer to rebuild your existing linkage, due to ,I believe, each linkage being slightly factory tweaked on the car for perfect(!) operation. Either way, they are the experts.
I dont know if Glenwood do anything Transmission related in SA, I know they build damned fine Alfa V6 engines!
I think the conversion can be done though!
Good luck!
 

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Hi Frost

Why do you think the isostatic shift mechanism is an improvement? I've never felt it was.

If you are determined to do this, you will need the whole assembly, the only part that isn't different same is the actual shifter that you move with you hand.

You will also need to remove your transmission, remove the front case and replace your existing internal shifter rod (that ends in a threaded rod followed by splines) and insert the iso style internal shifter rod that ends in a plain rod with a hole for a dowel pin.

Bye
 

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Discussion Starter #4
Hey guys, thanks for the advice so far, will get in touch with Alex to discus the short shift option, I believe it to be better as my 75s shift action is alot(well its relative on a transaxle isnt it)better than my 1980 giulietta 1.8
 

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The poor old isostatic is quite maligned... Mainly because most cars have worn out linkages and bushes now. Yes it can be improved a bit to get a short throw, but it basically gets a bad wrap from having lots of bits to wear out. And added to that a couple of the bits were a bit under specified.

Even when new (or all the worn parts are replaced), they needed some.. "blueprinting" to get them to operate precisely, for a while...

I think a good Isostatic is an improvement on the old system.
 
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