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Discussion Starter #21
Christopher, I did own a 1750 GTV with carbs 18 years back.. and it is as you say a real delight to drive....expecially on the track.

Papajam, it'll be because of guys like you who've been willing to save some of these out of production parts for all these years that'll make the restoration a lot easier than it would otherwise have been....so thanks to you again.
 

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Discussion Starter #22
The last couple of cars I restored I had to do all the repair welding with an oxy/acetylyne torch. The setup allowed for perfectly acceptable welds except that on the heavy gauge metal, a lot of heat was required and more time is required to apply as well. After reading some of restoration threads on this BB, I was convinced that a MIG welder with an Argon/Co2 gas would be the best all around set-up to use. I picked up this used Lincoln SP135( it was repainted and tuned up) from a welding Rental outfit that at times sells some of their surplus machines. I also bought a self darkening Helmet as recommended by a few on this BB.

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Not having used one of these before I practiced on numerous small pieces of clean sheet metal first so as to get a feel for the wire speed and voltage settings. The first repair I thought to tackle was that of the valence panel tabs which were badly rusted ....

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as were some of the areas were the mounting screws are attached. I cut out the small areas with a dremmel tool using the small oxide cut-off wheels (it cut through this very thin material very easily...to my surprise)..

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...I used short bursts of tack welds (letting each cool down in between) and welded on both sides of the repair pieces. If I had to do this with the oxy/acetylene I dare say that it would have been much harder for me to do...with the MIG, there was very little heat build-up on the part...

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Nice work, looks good. A MIG is the way to go. I can do some clean Oxy/Acl welding, but it takes for ever and the amount of heat required can make life hard. When you use the MIG, becareful not to let the weld completly cool before starting the next burst. If it does, you could end up with slag in the weld causing a weak spot. That will be a sweet car when you are done. I like my 69 1750, but I'm having a hard time keeping it close to stock (the more power bug is running rampant.) The US spec cars are rare, only 640 made.
Good luck with your project, if you need some year specific pictures, let me know and I will try and help you out.

Will
 

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Discussion Starter #25
Will, my MIG has Argon/Co2 and hence does not produce any slag at all...and so the welds end up very clean. Are you using a flux-core MIG machine? I wouldn't want to be cleaning the flux off of metal this thin....would be a real chore. As for the power situation, I was wanting to keep this car all original with the Spica FI, my previous GTVs were carburetted so I don't know how it'll compare till I drive it....but I'm not really looking to rebuild this into an all out street machine anyway. As for photos, I'll probably be asking for some for sure so thanks for the offer.
 

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Discussion Starter #26
Update time...the inner front panel needed straightening and the only way to do this properly was to remove everything that would be in the way. I ground away the bondo and cut with a 4.5 inch cut-off wheel along the previous repair weld line.
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..front panel removed..and inner diapragham pieces being dissambled...
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..front will get acid dipped.....
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...example of how not to weld the front panel on. This one was lap welded and the excess left on so as to be a good moisture trap...resulting in some bad rusting.
 

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Discussion Starter #27
I brought the front panel out to get acid cleaned at TECHNOSTRIP While I was there I saw a LANCIA FULVIA chassis that had been dipped and it looked great....so nice to work with clean rust free metal. They quoted me a cost of $2,000 to do a whole car, doors and all. In my case I don't believe it needs this radical a cleaning. The front panel is a thin piece and I didn't want to wirewheel it clean so I thought I'd try it to see if the results merit the expense...didn't realize they had a minimum cost of $100...but the end result looked great..

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...almost looks new...
 

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Nice work! Wow, that panel looks new. Looks like when it was replaced they really used the correct front panel, as well (however badly attached), since there are no welded-up lower holes. :)

Karl
 

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Yes, another '69 Resto!

Rossano,

Very nice car to start with. I am hooked to this thread. Looks like you are having a fun time with the car. Best of luck with the restoration.
 

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You're doing a fantastic job. Keep the pictures coming!!
 

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$100? That was a bargain for how clean the part came out. If you have gone this far, you might want to look into the rocker panels to see if there is rust inside. That $2000 for the whole car might start to look pretty inexpensive. ;)

I am also enjoying the thread watching one of my cars twins being put back on the road. Watching all of these cars being restored has me wanting to make a rotisserie now and doing my GTV up right and not half baked when it comes to the body prep.

Are you going with a glue in or rubber gasket windsheild?
 

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Rossano --

Great looking job, thanks for sharing the story.

But I have a question, especially for all the '69 GTV aficiandos here: is this not a '71? That engine block number may indicate a '69, but the large tail-lights and maybe the flushnose (weren't '69s step-nose?) indicate a '71, at least to me. I look to be corrected, perhaps.

Otherwise, Rossano, lead on!!
 

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The tail lights are not large, it's got the small tail lights, definitely looks like a '69....and no, 69's did not have the stepnose anymore
 

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Discussion Starter #35
Thanks for the encouraging words guys.

$100? That was a bargain for how clean the part came out. If you have gone this far, you might want to look into the rocker panels to see if there is rust inside. That $2000 for the whole car might start to look pretty inexpensive. ;)

I am also enjoying the thread watching one of my cars twins being put back on the road. Watching all of these cars being restored has me wanting to make a rotisserie now and doing my GTV up right and not half baked when it comes to the body prep.

Are you going with a glue in or rubber gasket windsheild?
Velocedoc...the 69's came with the rubber gasket windshields...I think the 2000 GTV's had the glue in style. As for acid dipping the whole car....yeah it looks tempting to have a completely stripped/clean car to work with but in my case the heavy rust is contained to floors only and other areas have surface rust so I didn't want to get into the potential "acid seepage issues" related to dipping...also saving that extra $2K on dipping will allow that me to put that money into the paint job.

Rossano --

Great looking job, thanks for sharing the story.

But I have a question, especially for all the '69 GTV aficiandos here: is this not a '71? That engine block number may indicate a '69, but the large tail-lights and maybe the flushnose (weren't '69s step-nose?) indicate a '71, at least to me. I look to be corrected, perhaps.

Otherwise, Rossano, lead on!!
Alfonse2...I'm not the expert on the variants for the GTV's but as far as I know, the 69 US GTV came with the smaller red over red tailights and the flushnose. In 70-71 they switched over to the larger tailight lens and hanging petals (twin Bonaldi boosters were discontinued), they also introduced the Fuel cut-off switch on the SPICA pump and other changes I'm sure were introduced.
 

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Well, here's my 2 cents:

I am sorry but I fail to see larger taillights anywhere in this thread... The taillights on Rossano (1750GT) 's car are DEFINITELY the earlier, smaller ones. If you are not familiar with them, the easiest way is to see whether the backup lights are integrated into the taillight assemblies. If they do, they're the larger, later lights for sure (the earlier cars have single rectangular backup light under the bumper).

Regarding the step-nose and the smooth-nose, all 1750s are smooth-nosed, regardless of the model year (the 1750 series debuted in Brussels show back in 1968). The GT1300Juniors, on the other hand, retained the step nose until late 1970, when the 1750 series 2 was introduced.

Rossano --

Great looking job, thanks for sharing the story.

But I have a question, especially for all the '69 GTV aficiandos here: is this not a '71? That engine block number may indicate a '69, but the large tail-lights and maybe the flushnose (weren't '69s step-nose?) indicate a '71, at least to me. I look to be corrected, perhaps.

Otherwise, Rossano, lead on!!
 

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You are correct, Taiga. I pulled some of my Alfa books after I posted and they are the smaller tailights; smooth-nose, too. I remembered my '67 GTV's being smaller than the ones in the photos, but...not.
 

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Discussion Starter #39 (Edited)
I'm lovin this thread. Can't wait to see whats next.
Simon, I do have more pics of work done so far to share ..but I'm out of town for the next couple of weeks so I won't be able to post anything till then.
 

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Discussion Starter #40
Guys, I just returned from the Northwest and spent some time at AKITAMAN's new shop...thanks again Daron for taking the time out of your schedule to play host...it was an informative and inspiring visit! It also reminded me that I have a project that I must get back onto again......so here are a few more updates of the work progress done so far.

As I mentioned previously, the radiator panel or diaphragm was rather poorly repaired at some point and dire need of correction. Although not visible when the engine and other systems were installed...it was definitely visible after the teardown....driver side inner skirt needed attention...no proper battery shelf...

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..and the paasenger side bumper bracket is not quite straight....

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..check out the angle of this bolt compared to the opposite side bolt....

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