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Rossano
Nice work! The accuracy of your replacement panel reflects your efforts.

In the future, consider heating the sheet metal in the area of the sharpest bend - it will take a lot less force to form the contours.
 

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Discussion Starter #202
The reason I didn't use heat is that the formers are aluminum and the anvil is a large block of steel that weighs about 100 lbs (i.e. a lot heat sinking material). I'm pretty sure that by the time I would have clamped it all up together after heating...it would have cooled down too much to be of benefit.

Thanks nonetheless for the tip.
 

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Discussion Starter #203
Correct :).

Pete
I see...funnny lingo ya'll have down there:) Actually Pete I only needed to remove the right side guard and did not cut it at the scuttle. So I'm not certain exactly where the braze joint is that you're dealing with?
 

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I see...funnny lingo ya'll have down there:) Actually Pete I only needed to remove the right side guard and did not cut it at the scuttle. So I'm not certain exactly where the braze joint is that you're dealing with?
Unfortunately I've not got a good photo, but the red circled areas of this photo is where the guard is bronzed to the scuttle.

Pete
 

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Discussion Starter #205
Got it Pete...and no, my car doesn't seem to have any significant corrosion along this joint. I guess since most of it's life was spent in the sunny southern states of the US it was spared from the rust producing moisture that the undercarriage would normally be exposed to...especially in the northern parts of this continent.
 

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Got it Pete...and no, my car doesn't seem to have any significant corrosion along this joint. I guess since most of it's life was spent in the sunny southern states of the US it was spared from the rust producing moisture that the undercarriage would normally be exposed to...especially in the northern parts of this continent.
Interesting, and also interesting because the panel you are repairing now on your car is perfectly fine on mine :eek:, yes really.

Funny stuff. I wonder if it has more to do with the quality of the steel that Alfa Romeo used when the car was built than it's life since? ... or some sort of combination??, ie: If the panel already had rust in it then it was hardly going to become rust free ... :).
Pete
 

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Discussion Starter #207
The problem was created due to improper storage of the vehicle. When I opened up the scuttle area, it was totally packed with dead leaves and dust....all good materials if absorption and moisture retention is desired. Likewise the drivers window was broken and left open...resulting in water entering and soaking the carpets.

I'm not of the belief that poor steel quality is the cause of ALFA's rusting, rather I believe that the problem was due to poor or inadequate coating technologies at the time. Labor disruptions also resulted in assembly line stoppages for days (if not weeks) which apparently left unfinished bare steel chassis sitting idle and exposed to the environment....which in the northern region of the country can be rather damp for many months of the year.
 

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I'm not of the belief that poor steel quality is the cause of ALFA's rusting, rather I believe that the problem was due to poor or inadequate coating technologies at the time.
Agree about completely missing coatings as there simply was none (just the same with my Sud I restored). Alfa Romeos of before say 1967 (?) did not rust as bad, infact I've heard of many early 105's being completely rust free. Alfa Romeo thanks to the controlling government did change to Russian steel and I've seen pictures of Ferraris in bare metal showing rust embedded in the steel ... yes they used the same steel. Now Ferraris are looked after a lot better than Alfa Romeos, but they do rust.
Labor disruptions also resulted in assembly line stoppages for days (if not weeks) which apparently left unfinished bare steel chassis sitting idle and exposed to the environment....which in the northern region of the country can be rather damp for many months of the year.
Yes I've read about this particularly with the Sud factory, but same mentality of workers so would not surprise me.

Best
Pete
 

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Pete, I think that in the period of time these cars were built in, IE. the Seventies, there was always going to be a bit of Union unrest going on. Italy, France, Great Britain, the US. and Canada, as well as many other industrialized countries all had labour problems that ended in strikes by their auto workers. Maybe some of these negotiations were the root cause of some of the problems that are hurting the auto industry today...
I think most things coming out of Russia, then and now, is crap:(.
 

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Discussion Starter #210
So I managed to squeeze in some time (on this hot summer like day...temperatures up to a record high 25-28 Celsius...in between gardening and such....) to finish off this piece. Here it's shown in position pre-fitted and ready to go!

IMG_2598.jpg

Some details...In my quest to keep true to the original shape as much as possible, I also formed the square depression using the same "drop hammer" method as I used to form the oval pocket.

IMG_2599.jpg

Also....I was able to salvage the curved flange from the original piece, which was a bit of a time saver (and not a feature that I would not have wanted to form...due to it's wide flange). I opted to retain the flange attached to inner sill and simply trimmed the new piece up to it.

IMG_2602.jpg
 

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If I had three hands I'd give you three thumbs up Rossano. :):):) Good job in matching up those pieces! :cool:. i can see your car is in good hands and will be restored properly. What's with the heat wave in Oakville? Out here we got up to 16 C. and that was just pleasant, sitting on the sundeck enjoying a beverage and thinking about working on the Alfa but not really doing anything about it heh heh heh.
 

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Discussion Starter #212
Thanks Dave....and that heat wave came up from the deep south and lasted as long as ohh...one day! But we're back down to the cooler teens tonight.....still, sure is much better than what we had a few months ago!
 

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Discussion Starter #213 (Edited)
So for the last couple of weeks I finally got onto the driver's pedal area . I started with some removal of the outer part first.

IMG_2614.jpg

I decided that on this side of the car I didn't need to remove the entire inboard portion of the floor. This saved me from having to disturb all of the pedal assy mounting brackets and tranny mounting bracket ( I saved myself a bit of time as well).

IMG_2423.jpg

...outboard side prefitted...

IMG_2640.jpg

...inboard side prefitted and welded in.

IMG_2694.jpg
 

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Discussion Starter #214
Before final welding, I pre-assembled all the pieces and attached the brake pedal assembly to ensure things lined up properly.

IMG_2679.jpg
IMG_2675.jpg

Ring doubler repaired and welded in...

IMG_2707.jpg

...outboard side partially welded in and plug welds on the doubler ground flush.

IMG_2715.jpg
 

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You're catching up to me! I gotta finish that 260Z I'm working on and get back to the Giulia!
 

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Nice work as usual.

Man those left hand drive cars sure have the most overly complex pedal arrangement. Makes me think they designed the right hand drive car first (correctly/nice and simple), and then went "holy-**** we need to make a left hand drive version too" ... :D

Pete
 

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Discussion Starter #217
...Man those left hand drive cars sure have the most overly complex pedal arrangement....
Pete
You're right about that Pete. This arrangement combined with all the hardware required for the the dual booster braking system must have given the Alfa Project Engineer of this car an ulcer or two I bet....especially when combined with the new Spica FI system. What a challenge that must have been!

You're catching up to me! I gotta finish that 260Z I'm working on and get back to the Giulia!
What? you've got another mistress in addition to Giulia? You must have one very understanding wife there Fabio! I'm sure you'll finish way ahead of me when you do get back on to it though.
 

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Discussion Starter #218
The rear floor section was prepared a while ago except for changing out the seat belt anchor point on the new pan with the original anchor point. The differences between the two can be seen the photo below. On the original, the mounting point is located about 25 mm further up so as the provide additional clearance to the exhaust pipe which runs along this side of the tunnel.

IMG_2632.jpg

..so I removed the new piece and replaced it with the original. I also unrolled the forward edge and rolled the aft edge so as to close the large gap that would otherwise exist.

IMG_2726.jpg

...almost fully welded in now. Unfortunately, although these replacement pans are pretty close to the originals....there still is quite a bit of massaging required...by no means are they a drop in replacement.

IMG_2781b.jpg
 

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Unfortunately, although these replacement pans are pretty close to the originals....there still is quite a bit of massaging required...by no means are they a drop in replacement.
I think that is the case for nearly all panels, even original panels and where the skill comes in.

Pete
 

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Discussion Starter #220
You're right about that Pete...every new panel I replaced required moderate to considerable rework...

So this past week I managed to flip the car onto the other side so as to complete the remaining outer flange welds. On the front floor panel outer flange I finished the plug welds on the 3/8" holes. The jacking point also needed to be revised to match the reproduction panel (these new panels don't quite replicate 100% the depth of the original and are about 1/4" shallower).

IMG_2847.jpg

On the rear panel, I used a different approach on the outer flange. Instead of removing the original floor flange, I left it in place but trimmed it flush to the inside face of the inner sill. The new floor I trimmed up to this edge and added an upward facing 90 degree flange for stability during welding....finished off with full length weld.



IMG_2848.jpg
 
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