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Aye laddie, looking good! You're going to have a truly rust-free Alfa after all this work. One of the few on the planet :). Sheesh! I've been using my vise-grips and ball pein hammer too much when now I see that a C clamp would do the trick that much better. I think Akitaman might have a position for you in his shop if you ever decide to move :cool:.
 

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Discussion Starter #182
Aye laddie, looking good! You're going to have a truly rust-free Alfa after all this work. One of the few on the planet :). Sheesh! I've been using my vise-grips and ball pein hammer too much when now I see that a C clamp would do the trick that much better...
Dave, when aligning parts I prefer to use clamps...it's like having eight hands working for you all at once. I use hammers for forming and flattening primarily.

...think Akitaman might have a position for you in his shop if you ever decide to move :cool:.
You know I visited Daron's shop about 2 years ago and man....the way this economy is going these days...I may need to investigate that possibility too!
 

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Amazing restoration you've got on your hands! It looks incredible!

Question, on the first page you have an image of the engine number. Where is it located? on the left or right hand side? I have a 71 project and i tried looking for it but it was much too cluttered. Do i need to take anything off to access it?

Thanks,

Phillip
 

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Discussion Starter #184
Philip: Thanks for the compliments. My engine number is located on the right side, below the intake manifold and just behind the FI pump and distributor. The air cleaner should only need to be removed to see it.
 

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Discussion Starter #185
This week I've been slacking off....but did manage to finish off welding the intake and to started rust repair on the deflector flange.

IMG_2343.jpg

When splicing in a piece like this I usually hold the pieces together by clamping them down onto a heavy steel plate.

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Also, so as to prevent burning holes all over the weld line I place some 1/8 inch copper plate in between (don't remember who suggested this...probably AKITAMAN).

IMG_2349.jpg

Parts stays nice and flat this way and it results in minimal distortion. I'll weld the other side next.

IMG_2351.jpg
 

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Burn through ... copper plate ... heck I just lift off the throttle :D. When welding thin metal you need to do (well I do) a series of tacs (ensuring of course you are getting full penetration), you never give the MIG it's head and just run a bead ... well I never do.

Even when welding thick stuff you should sort of play with the trigger or move in little steps, unless you want a weld as bad as the original Italian ones ;) LOL.

As always looking good, and yeah that Akitaman knows what he is talking about.
Pete
ps: I've used the big flat plate before ... long since lost mine :(
 

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Discussion Starter #187
Pete, I've done the one tack at a time thing as well....a much slower process. With this method I can run a longer bead (half inch to one inch or so at a time) without worrying too much about blowing large holes through.The backing plate also keeps things nice and flat with very little warpage...especially on flat thin pieces like this. For me this method works nicely since I'm only a casual weekend welder and I get really ticked when I blow big holes thorough a weld line and have to fill it all up.
 

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I`ve used that copper plate heat sink idea as well-I`m sure I got that tip via Akitaman`s posts and it works well when you can get to the back of whatever you are doing-it does allow longer runs which quickens up a repair.
Talking of thin sheet I`ve taken a break from my Giulia Ti and am doing a Fiat 500. That is much thinner guage metal and requires for a weekend warrior some deft trigger work and resetting of the mig.
 

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We have a site called trademe which is the equivalent of ebay everywhere else and we bought this 500 from the North Island without actually viewing the car, relying on the vendors description, opinion and the photos posted. It was supposedly ready for a repaint once surface rust was removed. It turned out to rolled ,bowled and arse holed. The bog in the sills was an inch and half thick over rusty banged in sills and the rhs A pillar and winscreen surround once we got back to metal revealed poorly repaired roll over damage. The car is almost as bad as Pete Skudder`s (PSK) 1750.
Good thing is parts are as cheap as. It`s a challenge and I`m determined to repair better than new. It`s well on the way and because it is so small takes less time than any of my Alfas which are large and "excessive" in comparison.
We`ve really got into the small Fiat thing having purchased a 126 which we thought was going to be a rusty mechanical donor for the 500 but turned out to be very tidy. $20 to fill it and give over a weeks running. I prefer driving around town in it to my GTV6 and the 126 certainly doesn`t hold up traffic often getting around faster than any of our other cars plus giving that fun factor. Not as cute as a 500 though and looking forward to getting the 500 mobile. Ironic thing is they are appreciating at a faster rate than our Alfas and I reckon its probably worth even now more than my W124 280E Mercedes or the E36 BMW, my Alfettas or my GTV6.
 

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Nice - no actually superb work and a great thread!! I grew up with my car having inherited it and can honestly say that your post has taught me more about the actual structure of the car than anything else I have read or seen - superb!

Have to say kinda amazed at the way you have fabricated panels and parts to fit and they look so good - and the detail of the work!

Hope you keep posting as I cant wait to see it but also as this post is seriously informative to anyone who needs it as you literally deal with each peice in such detail - keep going mate!
 

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Discussion Starter #193
Opposite side welded, ground flush and phosphated.

IMG_2418.jpg

Here it's primered and ready .....but it won't get installed till later.

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So next I'm going to tackle the driver's side floors except that this time I'm not removing the outer sill since it's in excellent condition and the rust is really only surface rust (as I discovered when I disassembled the passenger side sill).
 

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Funny we're both working in similar areas now. You've removed your guards haven't you?. Did you have any rust where the guard connects to the scuttle? This is where originally the guard is bronzed to the scuttle. I did and interestingly when I melted the bronze out to remove that piece of the guard I found cracks ... or the melting process made cracks.

I don't find the tacking method that much slower because I do lots of tacks quickly, ie: first every inch, and then dividing those tacks and then so on ... I also grind the welds down in between maybe once. So some times I'm doing a tack or so a second. Anyway your method is obviously working beaut. I like the way you remove panels to work on them ... I should give this more of a go.

Pete
 

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Discussion Starter #195
Pete..sorry for the late reply here. But if you mean along this flange....then yes, there is some rust along here also. On my car this piece is spot welded and not brazed....I've already removed both outer the ends of this flange (in order to remove that rust) and re-attached them to the guard (see in my previous photo). So I've still got the middle piece to deal with which I'll do just before reinstalling the guard.

Slide1.jpg
 

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Discussion Starter #196
Aft floor section removed....that was the easy part.

IMG_2424.jpg

..this cross piece is going to be a challenge. I checked with APE to see if they were willing to cut this part out from one of the cars they're parting out but unfortunately I was told they had none available. So it looks like I'll have to make a completely new piece myself. I'll probably go from the square notched section step (at the tranny tunnel side...bottom end in the photo) out to the inner sill (upper end in the photo).


IMG_2440.jpg
 

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Rossano
After viewing your efforts and results so far - the only challenge this poses for you is finding the time to effect it. You do great work - keep inspiring us!
 

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Discussion Starter #199
I wanted the new piece to have the same features as the original, so I needed to make a forming die for the pocket. The pocket is .200 in deep and so I used 3/16 in thick Aluminum. I drilled a series of 1/8 holes all the way around the perimeter shape and then using a thin chisel I cut through the thin material that was left between the holes (this provides both the inner and outer former) Lastly, with a bit of filing and sanding of the the surfaces you end up with this (the gap between these 2 parts is required for material allowance).

IMG_2511.jpg

In order to get 14 Gauge steel (about .075 inch thick) to flow into the former cavity, I had to create an improvised drop hammer press. Here you can see the various parts all stacked up on my flat anvil...the outer former sits on the bottom first, next the sheet metal, then the inner former, then a 1/2 thick steel plate...all clamped together. To cushion the hammer blows I put a piece of 3/8 inch thick piece of plywood up against the steel plate.

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It took about 20 firm blows with a 10 lb sledge hammer to fully form the pocket. The whole process worked out rather well first time actually, which was a real bonus.

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