Alfa Romeo Forums banner

1 - 10 of 10 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
444 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
I am planning to take 2 sets of 101 rims to the powder coater. Virtually all 8 rims have at least one hub cap clip missing. Seems there are a few options.
--to weld back on clips which are missing
--to bolt on where clips are missing after powder coating
--to remove all clips and uniformly bolt clips back on following powder coating

Advice most welcome
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
10,584 Posts
Agree with divotandtralee about "A" - I wouldn't weld, as that would kill the temper on the spring steel clips. Plus, welding would make it hard to replace a broken clip.

Agree with divotandtralee about "B" - Repaired my own Giulia wheels that way when several of the clips were broken.

However, I don't see a problem with "C", except that it violates the old "if it ain't broke, don't mess with it" rule. If rosso is troubled by having some clips riveted and some bolted, that would make things consistent (though no one would ever see it). It might make sense to replace all the clips - those 101 hubcaps are pretty valuable - and "C" is the only way to do that.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
875 Posts
I am not sure whether powder coating is such a great idea. I can say that conventional auto paint, as used on fenders, etc., does not work well on wheels, because it chips. If I were refinishing a set of wheels, I would have them media blasted and paint them with a light paint made for the purpose. The Wurth silver wheel paint seems to work well, but I have only used it for touch up. Maybe others can chime in on this.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,137 Posts
I rivet missing clips and do not recommend powder coating wheel because you cannot repair small scratches. I know from experience that powered wheels will rust.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
455 Posts
I am not sure whether powder coating is such a great idea. I can say that conventional auto paint, as used on fenders, etc., does not work well on wheels, because it chips. If I were refinishing a set of wheels, I would have them media blasted and paint them with a light paint made for the purpose. The Wurth silver wheel paint seems to work well, but I have only used it for touch up. Maybe others can chime in on this.
I’ll second this. Any damage to the powder coat finish such as curbing or a bent rim is not going to be fixable unlike paint. Also, powder doesn’t look anything like original if that’s an issue.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
7,685 Posts
I always used the following procedure---sand blast.....flash primer...Dupont Centauri Enamel without clear coat. a Ford Silver...Enamel is hard to find, I know. I was never too keen on the silvers used by powder coaters. They tended to have too large a metal flake .. The finish was everlasting and did not mask over the details of the wheels unless the painter got too exuberant with layering on too much primer. It is all in the process. I would go with the water based process in this day and age, as enamels are really hard to find and painters, don't use it.. These wheels (photo) were done with a water base clear coat. It's also a good idea to clean out the joint between the wheel web and the rim after blasting. It's all in the details of what you tell the applicator
084.JPG
 

·
Administrator
Joined
·
3,805 Posts
I'll second my learned Uncle D&T, we gently blast the wheels, clean out the joint between the rim & the center, then primer the whole thing

I rivet the new clips on using a hot rivet technique, oxy acetylene, a purpose made punch and a big hammer - we're pretty good at it now. Then I re-coat the primer where I've heated the rivet to cinch it. Rust Oleum grey primer works for me. Then I paint and clear coat the rims.

Ciao
Greig
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
7,685 Posts
I'll second my learned Uncle D&T, we gently blast the wheels, clean out the joint between the rim & the center, then primer the whole thing

I rivet the new clips on using a hot rivet technique, oxy acetylene, a purpose made punch and a big hammer - we're pretty good at it now. Then I re-coat the primer where I've heated the rivet to cinch it. Rust Oleum grey primer works for me. Then I paint and clear coat the rims.

Ciao
Greig
Yep, peening in place cold is a fool's errand .. It just doesn't get the fit tight...
 
1 - 10 of 10 Posts
Top