Alfa Romeo Forums banner
1 - 15 of 15 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,353 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I am FINALLY halfway done with my trailing arm bushing replacement (ask me for tips and pitfalls if you're contemplating this job). So far, so good, except I managed to slightly damage one of the trailing arm to bushing carrying tube brazed joints in an early unadvised attempt to press the old bushings out without proper support. I deformed the trailing arm, pulling it away from the bushing carrier by about 1/8th of the circumference.

I've never brazed (have soldered and welded). Can anyone give me advice on how to repair the damage i've done, or if its really necessary?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
591 Posts
r-mm,

I'm no expert here, but I'd be very reluctant to try to repair a major suspension component once it's been tweaked. Trailing arms are relatively cheap and available, I'd look for a replacement. Try Larry at Alfa Parts Exchange. If you don't have any luck, I might have an extra one sitting around the garage. BTW, where are you located?

Best regards,
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,353 Posts
Discussion Starter · #3 ·
I'm In CT. I don't see any reason it can't be repaired... plus I have a lot of hours (and one new bearing) into the arm.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,353 Posts
Discussion Starter · #5 ·
They are so lousy (cell phone)... I'll go with my real camera this weekend.

From my web research it seems that mild steel is most often brazed with flux and brass (or other yellow metal) rod. If I heat the work up enough to braze the damaged area, will I melt out the existing filler metal?
 

Attachments

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
1,754 Posts
I'm not an expert but it would seem to me that the lateral load on this sleeve would be very small. Its purpose is to support a bushing that takes high up/down and fore/aft loads. Damage to 1/8 of its circumference-repaired - should insignificant.

But why try to do it yourself? Aren't you on a schedule (or did it already get by you like my 4th of July "Jack stands down; wheels on the ground!" plan?

Anyhow take it to a local shop with a six pack of beer under your arm and be done in 20 minutes. You'll feel better in that first sweeper and even if they charge you- no big deal; tell the wife that discretion is the better part of valour and you did it for her. Works here :
;)
You can take your time learning to braze this coming cold, cold winter.

This is,of course, just my opinion FWIW.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,212 Posts
I wonder how you managed to get this damaged like this in the first place?
In the days I did this kind of job myself I burned out the rubber, and hacksawed the metal ring, after that you can push or hammer (if rusted) it out.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,353 Posts
Discussion Starter · #9 ·
I am on a schedule, I just keep adjusting it to suit reality....
After this little hitch I should be "wheels on the ground" promptly followed by "car towed to bodyshop" and then things will REALLY start happening. In the spirit of your comments, I decided to hand the rust repair (floors, spare tire well) and undercoating off to a body shop rather than crawl under my car with rattle cans and wire wheels.

Veep... I tried to press out the old bearings without properly supporting the trailing arm. Rookie mistake. I just couldn't accept that burning/hacksawing is the "right" way to do something. And PS I found that using a 1-1/2" hole saw on a drill press will get all 4 existing rubber's much more cleanly.

I wonder how you managed to get this damaged like this in the first place?
In the days I did this kind of job myself I burned out the rubber, and hacksawed the metal ring, after that you can push or hammer (if rusted) it out.
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
12,437 Posts
Heat most likely will ruin the bushing rubber. Brazing is not a "cool" weld. Moreover, from my knowledgable friend who can even weld the silver foil around a stick of gum, there are many types of brazing. Some hard, others flexible, some strong and others weak. You really need to know how it was done, and the type brazing at build.
In short, my best advice is to get another trailing arm.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
741 Posts
Brazing is fine, you need spelter & flux, take it to a welding guy, he will do it in 30 mins no problem. I dont get the nanny type advice you have above. Sorry guys!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
816 Posts
Brazing Trailing arm

Where are you in Ct? I'd be happy to look at this for you. If I can't do it, I have a great welder/fabricator who builds race car suspension.
Keith
Alfas Unlimited
860-542-2599
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,353 Posts
Discussion Starter · #13 ·
Hey Keith - I'm in new haven. I think we've run into each other a few times - at precision automotive and then I stopped in your shop a few weekends ago to poke around.

I'll bring the trailing arm into your shop if I'm heading back that way.

Hey by the way do you have any recommendations for a body shop in CT? I'll be looking for a great but not concourse paint job at some point when i finish welding these floors.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
816 Posts
If you get to Precision first, drop it off there. I get there almost every week. Otherwise, stop by and I can probably re-braze it pretty easily.
Keith
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,169 Posts
In the days I did this kind of job myself I burned out the rubber, and hacksawed the metal ring, after that you can push or hammer (if rusted) it out.
I have just completed a rear suspension rebuild and used the above approach, though this doesn't help you at the moment. With care, the old bushes can be removed without marking the housings, though it takes some time.

Once the old bushes were out and the trailing arms cleaned up and repainted, pressing in the new bushes was a very easy job.

Most Alfa spare parts dealers sell reproduction trailing arms quite cheaply and having damaged one, this would be the way I'd go.

Chris
 
1 - 15 of 15 Posts
Top