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Pete, there are plenty of people here who will happily argue a well tuned Spica car is better than one with carbs. Personally give me carbs any day, just passing on an observation.
Spica I think is one situation where it was not that detrimental. But a lot of cars lost hp big time thanks to early emission stuff

I'm glad my car has carbs though. My father had a 2002tii and very similar system to Spica, and no issues
Pete
 

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Safety bumpers weren’t the product of the nanny state trying to improve safety, but rather the result of government listening to big business - the insurance industry, who claimed they would result in less accident damage and lower insurance rates. Of course, in front collisions above 5 mph they dramatically increased repair costs and ended up a complete failure.
The result was cars that were uglier, heavier, slower and less fuel efficient. Weight is the enemy of performance and as Colin Chapman said, increased HP improves performance on straights, reduced weight improves performance everywhere.

As to North American emission standards, in the age of climate change it’s hard to argue that it was anything but forward thinking. So too Cafe standards, both of which forced the automakers into developing new technologies that have benefitted all of us. New engines are much cleaner and more fuel efficient while also producing more power.

The problem, of course, is that early efforts at reducing emissions were incredibly inefficient and Alfas from the mid 70’s to early 80’s were no exception. In jurisdictions where cars of this vintage are smog inspection exempt, it is left to the owner to decide whether the improvement in performance through eliminating air pumps, cat converters, installing carbs, exhaust headers etc. is socially acceptable. Let’s face it, that these cars are both rare and rarely used as day to day transportation minimizes any environmental impact to the point of virtual irrelevance.

I view them as rare working examples of historical design and technology which can bring joy not only to the owner/operators, but to the public at large. I do not own one, but am thrilled at seeing vintage air craft perform during air shows. So too at watching vintage car races. Even though in both cases, the engines pollute and use fuel at a much higher rate than would be acceptable today for mass use. Your mileage may vary.
 

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I will add I really am disappointed with current vehicle manufacturers using throw away plastic as the ineffective bumpers nowadays. This world has a huge problem with plastic, and our modern cars plastic bumpers often fail and require replacement. Surely there is a better answer, that also is not ugly? ... maybe dense foam bumpers?

And before anybody jumps on the "plastic can be recycled bandwagon" => it isn't, as it is cheaper to produce new plastic: How Big Oil Misled The Public Into Believing Plastic Would Be Recycled. This is where our tax money should be spent. Who cares if it is not economically viable, we should limit the production of new plastic and recycle the old stuff using our tax dollars. What the heck are our governments doing?

We have climate change AND plastic to worry about nowadays, and not enough noise is made about plastic. So ridiculous when we have glass that we could return to making bottles out of, and paper for bags. Honestly is anybody in control of this place? Seems like an utter mess to me
Pete
 

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Great point, Pete. If we can subsidize electric vehicles, we can also sibsidize plastic recycling in spite of opposition for both from the oil industry. For that matter, what‘s wrong with aesthetically pleasing, design integrated stainless bumpers such as Alfa used in the early Spiders?
 

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Pete, those plastic ‘bumpers’ are only covers. They’re designed to withstand 2.5mph impact only. The real bumpers are underneath. The way the bumper covers are designed now is as much about aerodynamics as it is safety.
 

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Pete, those plastic ‘bumpers’ are only covers. They’re designed to withstand 2.5mph impact only. The real bumpers are underneath. The way the bumper covers are designed now is as much about aerodynamics as it is safety.
But the covers still end up in rubbish dumps. Rather the covers were sheet metal. Metal is considerably better than plastic in land fills
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Safety bumpers weren’t the product of the nanny state trying to improve safety, but rather the result of government listening to big business - the insurance industry, who claimed they would result in less accident damage and lower insurance rates. Of course, in front collisions above 5 mph they dramatically increased repair costs and ended up a complete failure.
The result was cars that were uglier, heavier, slower and less fuel efficient. Weight is the enemy of performance and as Colin Chapman said, increased HP improves performance on straights, reduced weight improves performance everywhere.

As to North American emission standards, in the age of climate change it’s hard to argue that it was anything but forward thinking. So too Cafe standards, both of which forced the automakers into developing new technologies that have benefitted all of us. New engines are much cleaner and more fuel efficient while also producing more power.

The problem, of course, is that early efforts at reducing emissions were incredibly inefficient and Alfas from the mid 70’s to early 80’s were no exception. In jurisdictions where cars of this vintage are smog inspection exempt, it is left to the owner to decide whether the improvement in performance through eliminating air pumps, cat converters, installing carbs, exhaust headers etc. is socially acceptable. Let’s face it, that these cars are both rare and rarely used as day to day transportation minimizes any environmental impact to the point of virtual irrelevance.

I view them as rare working examples of historical design and technology which can bring joy not only to the owner/operators, but to the public at large. I do not own one, but am thrilled at seeing vintage air craft perform during air shows. So too at watching vintage car races. Even though in both cases, the engines pollute and use fuel at a much higher rate than would be acceptable today for mass use. Your mileage may vary.
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SPICA is not an American invention.. moreover, it was more than a pollution control device. Iniezione on the back of the car was a marketing coup.. It was pure Italian flair. They could have easily used a badge that said F.I. 2000 (or 1750) but in a stroke of genius added it in Italian to give it a mystique. Fuel injection was the wave of the future and Alfa took advantage of it in it's largest market .. the USA with technology that was on the shelf..
 

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SPICA is not an American invention.. moreover, it was more than a pollution control device. Iniezione on the back of the car was a marketing coup.. It was pure Italian flair. They could have easily used a badge that said F.I. 2000 (or 1750) but in a stroke of genius added it in Italian to give it a mystique. Fuel injection was the wave of the future and Alfa took advantage of it in it's largest market .. the USA with technology that was on the shelf..
Actually what I find interesting about that period is just how far Alfa was prepared to go for the US market. In general terms it was a small market for them throughout the 60's and 70's, the big selling cars were Giulia sedans, smaller engined coupes, and of course the Sud. Only a few of which were marketed in the US, none in many cases and for many years. Yet put a US spec GTV, Spider, or Berlina next to one from any other market and the detail differences are everywhere. They must have lost huge sums over the years developing and selling those cars.
 

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Looking at their history, Alfa Romeo never retreated from the prospect of low volume, specialized projects. Think of the Montreal, the Junior Zagato, the SZ series, even the Zagato Quattroruotte 105 based tribute to the 1750 Gran Sport. It has been to our benefit as Alfisti faithful over the decades, that our favorite car company always seemed to find the desire, resources, time and talent to execute such small scale production that most manufacturers would never consider.

Mille grazie, Alfa Romeo... (y)(y)(y)
 
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