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New member here. I recently came across a deal on a non-running but everything there Alfa Romeo GTV 2000. I'm a little clueless on what's the average price of these cars.

Initially I believe it needs:

1. Respray with minor rust repair
2. Engine work - turns over mechanically but doesn't run
3. Interior refurb

Any advice greatly appreciated.

Thanks in advance.
 

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New member here. I recently came across a deal on a non-running but everything there Alfa Romeo GTV 2000. I'm a little clueless on what's the average price of these cars.

Initially I believe it needs:

1. Respray with minor rust repair
2. Engine work - turns over mechanically but doesn't run
3. Interior refurb

Any advice greatly appreciated.

Thanks in advance.
Somewhere between $2,000 and $20,000. Can't be more precise without more details and pictures...

Scott
 

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Just based on my recent shopping around and purchase, a pretty nice car that needs nothing right now is low 30s. Give or take. A glass out paint job is $10K. Rust repair ? let's call it $2 extra conservatively (no pics). An interior probably 2-5K depending on how much you need (still no pics). Mechanical ? Who knows... but I have a $5000 bill for a big tuneup/resurrection one month before I bought the car so I'll go with that... Just throwing darts at a board here... Your time? Free...
So logically, based on the start price of a nice car and subtracting that.... no more than 10K, but when has logic ever factored into classic car decisions ;-)
 

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Discussion Starter #5 (Edited)
Just based on my recent shopping around and purchase, a pretty nice car that needs nothing right now is low 30s. Give or take. A glass out paint job is $10K. Rust repair ? let's call it $2 extra conservatively (no pics). An interior probably 2-5K depending on how much you need (still no pics). Mechanical ? Who knows... but I have a $5000 bill for a big tuneup/resurrection one month before I bought the car so I'll go with that... Just throwing darts at a board here... Your time? Free...
So logically, based on the start price of a nice car and subtracting that.... no more than 10K, but when has logic ever factored into classic car decisions ;-)
Thanks for the info.

What's an acceptable amount of rust for these cars? What are the typical rust locations?
 

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Thanks for the info. Here are a few pics of the car as it sits.

What's an acceptable amount of rust for these cars? What are the typical rust locations?
What do you mean by "acceptable?" Do you want to restore the car and keep it? Or a quick fix and then flip it? If the former, just about anything can be brought back from the dead with enough sheetmetal patching and replacement (there are several very long threads here with members doing just that -- bringing these cars back from the dead -- browse or search to find them). Just takes time and $$$. If the latter, that's always a risky proposition unless you do all the work yourself and don't expect to be compensated for it.

The typical rust locations are well-documented here, time and time again. Recommend you use the search function, as you will be able to find threads with detailed pictures and tips on how to check certain areas.

Don't take my response the wrong way -- I'm not trying to be rude, there are just way too many very good threads here to look at. Better to find several of those than to start a completely new one.

I also recommend you review the videos by Vintage Customs on youtube - they specialize in Alfa's.

Good luck!

Scott
 

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Respray with minor rust repair
deschodt said:
Rust repair ? let's call it $2 extra conservatively
Few non-running Alfas that have been stored outdoors are going to have only minor rust. I would recommend budgeting more than $2K for rust repair.

Looking at the underhood photo, the amount of rust on the brake booster and vapor separator suggest that this GTV has seen some moisture. The fact that it is parked on an unpaved surface and covered with leaves is further evidence of moisture. I would strongly advise having a knowledgeable body guy assess the rust damage - it could be considerable.

Do you know how long the car has been sitting in that location? More than a few years outdoors spells trouble.

puma1824 said:
What's an acceptable amount of rust for these cars?
What's "acceptable"? Well, how much money do you have? It is generally cheaper to spend more for a less-rusted car, than to try to salvage a badly corroded one.

What are the typical rust locations?
These cars rust down low: floors, wheel arches, and rocker panels. Note that the rockers on a unibody car are part of the frame, so rocker panel rust is more of a problem than it might be on a body-on-frame classic car. GTV's also rust beneath the front and rear windshields.
 

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See where that car has been sitting derelict?? On the wet ground??? That's the quickest way to ruin a car I can think of. And why was it left derelict in the first place . . . almost certainly because it didn't run and needed some expensive repairs. $2k for rust repair? IMO that's grossly underestimated considering there's going to be rot in places you can't see openly.

You have to assume that the entire undercarriage is eaten up with rust until it's high up on a lift and proven otherwise by an experienced inspector. Otherwise, it's just a parts car as far as value is concerned. That car's a mess. Assume it needs everything.

IMO, you'd be WAY ahead in time and cost, putting the money up-front into a much better and running example. Thinking you're going to save money by restoring a derelict rusty wreck is a fools errand.
 

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Which country are you in?

Which country are YOU in, NigelR...? :whistling:

Come on, Guys, everybody edit your profile and signature: where are you and which Alfas do you own/are you going to be talking about?

Chuck
 

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Which country are YOU in...? :whistling:

Come on, Guys, everybody edit your profile and signature: where are you and which Alfas do you own/are you going to be talking about?

Chuck
My profile should have location (Maryland, USA). I don't currently have any Alphas
 

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Was responding to NigelR's post above: cracked me up! Your profile shows where you are, puma1824, but NigelR's doesn't...

Chuck

PS, you'll want to change the spelling of Alpha to Alfa.
 

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Which country are YOU in, NigelR...? :whistling:

Come on, Guys, everybody edit your profile and signature: where are you and which Alfas do you own/are you going to be talking about?

Chuck
Oops, fixed! :blushing:

I originally looked at having a basket case 1750 MkII restored and over here the base car was £5K. It had been kept in a barn for several years, so probably was not quite as bad as this but was not in good shape. It needed a lot of work and it turned out to be far too expensive for me (as I could not do any work on it myself and would have to pay a restorer).

Like John (Roadtrip) said, restoring a very rusty car like this is not a good way to go about things unless you have a lot of money or are prepared to do the work yourself over a long period. I started out down that path and gave up due to the expense. Instead, just like John says, I bought a car that someone else had put a lot of money into already. And even then I still spent more than I anticipated getting her in really good shape. But I have a good car for a lot less than it would have cost me to have one like this properly restored.
 

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Body condition and trim is everything.

Mechanicals are simple and in good supply and with Alfas a different engine number does not matter as not tied to a particular chassis.
Pete
 

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Psk,

sorry but that is simply not true.

Engine number in itself no. But if you are going to build a standard setting car, let us say an early GT1600 from say 65, you do NOT want a hanging filter 105.26 Giulia engine in it. Even though a Nord engine of correct capacity. And finding an original GT1600 engine might be looking for a needle in a haystack.
Also, engine numbers do not follow chassis numbers. True. But they fit in a range, ie, certain numbers belong inside a range for certain chassis numbers and build years. Fusi , albeit not 100% correct , lists those numbers.

For the topic starter: If you are NOT versed into alfa lore, ( you wrote Alpha after all...) DO have some GOOD, reputable specialist inspect the car. Better to spend a few 100 on a goog inspection than the nightmares you might have later. Doing two sills on an average Coupe is more than 40 hours work alone. Most basket cases need them....
 

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Okay learnt something regarding the engine number range.

More point was that the fact it is not running is a non-event. Body condition matters considerably more as it is easy to turn it into a runner, even if another engine/gearbox is required (this being a "common" 2000).
Pete
 
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