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Discussion Starter #1
I have replaced the York compressor with Sanden unit off of a Milano. Everything has bolted up fine, except for the suction (return) hose. This one is a bit long now due to the differnce in hose locations on the compressors. If I get everything lined up to tighten down the fitting on this hose, the hose itself is very close to the exhaust manifold. Actually, I'm going to have to be careful when I tighten it down to make sure it's not touching.

For those of you who have done this conversion, how did you handle this? For anyone else reading, any tips or ideas to keep me from burning/melting the return hose?
 

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I am doing the same thing and thought that those elbows that go into the compressor can be moved. Try to pivot it straight back. I am not 100% sure of this but it is worth a try. I broke my sense line to my central TXV so anyone with some insight into that would be great!
 

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When I updated my system, I added a new dryer, compressor and evaporator and then had new hoses made up that kept everything well away from the exhaust manifold. It was worth the effort to make up new hoses.

Gary
 

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Discussion Starter #4
I'm kinda hoping to keep from making up new hoses. I'll go that route if I need to, but I've already been without this car for 5 weeks, due to a failing waterpump. Plus I'm cheap, hence the used compressor off of a Milano. Of course, AC is a must during the summer here in Big D as you know, so I'll probably end up getting some new hoses. I've already got the new drier, but want to have the rest of the system buttoned up before I put that on.


20 question time:
Do you have the Tropic-Aire system? Do you know/remember the lengths of the hoses you had made? How hard was the r/r of the hoses on the evaporator(s)? Did you replace just the evaporator in the center console? If so, what did you use? How difficult was replacing the evaporator?

I might take this opportunity to rebuild the entire system. Or do it as inexpensively as possible now, and save for a complete rebuild/refit later. I wasn't really planning on doing this right now, but since I've got all of the cooling system out to change the waterpump, access is relatively good.
 

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I would LOVE LOVE LOVE it if someone could work up a tutorial on upgrading the AC. My York compressor is totally dead so I have to replace it anyway. Might as well go with a Sanden. But one mechanic said I'd have to replace all of the switches and wiring too, since replacing those components would overburden the stock pieces. That's why he quoted me $3000 to do the job. I'm not paying more for the friggin AC than I did for the entire car. I'll muddle through and do it myself, thanks!
 

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But one mechanic said I'd have to replace all of the switches and wiring too, since replacing those components would overburden the stock pieces.
That is BS, IMO. The only things that are switched are the blower (which isn't changed), the auxillary radiator fan and the compressor clutch. I doubt that there is much difference in clutch current. And the clutch and radiator fan are most likely controlled by a relay.
 

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Discussion Starter #7
I will need to change out one wire. Well, the plug, really. The wire for the field coil on the new compressor has a female blade connector, whereas the York had a male.

I think I am going to go ahead and change out the hose, at least on the suction side. If for no other reason than to put the port in a more accessible location than right on top of the compressor.
 

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You DO NOT need to replace the wiring, switches etc to up grade your system. I switched to a Sanden compressor, a new condensor (the largest one I could fit) and a new dryer. The evaporator I left alone so as to not change the inside of the car. While at it I took out the evaporators and had them cleaned and flushed and checked for leaks. I put it all back together with new hoses which where made up locally. I took the guy at the ac shop the lengths I wanted and the type of fittings needed to make the connections and he made me new hoses. While I had the blower fans out I took them apart and cleaned and checked every part and sealed the fan casing to minimise loss from the fans. While at it I also ran a switch to the dash for the second radiator clooing fan to one of the dummy switches on the dash so I can turn the fans on if I want while sitting in traffic. All in all it works great even in Texas in 106 degree heat though I don't run the AC too often as I prfer the way the engine responds with it off. One thing I've thought about but haven't done is window titning. It sure would help to cut radiant heat in the car and would make the AC even more effective. The limiting factor in my system is the volume of air the AC fans can deliver.
 
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