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In the old days of owning my very early 64 Sprint GT, which did just dump the blowby and oil out onto the ground, I ran the hose to an old oil can, with brass wool in it, mounted in the bay and collected condensed oil in it as I ran the car. I was surprised how much oil was recovered, which I then just poured back into the engine. True, vapors were still dumped to the atmosphere, but still, I collected a fair amount of oil, from an engine which ran just great otherwise.
 
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Discussion Starter #102
Here's a pretty typical failing suspect OVS in the flesh,.... .

 

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Put mine together in an afternoon. Looks and works great. Mine needed the "L" at the bottom but I was able to find some copper pipe fittings at HD that worked well. Used a narrow strip of weatherstrip around the barrel and it forms a tight bond with the bracket to hold in place. Not painting it. I like how it looks.
 

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Discussion Starter #104 (Edited)
Put mine together in an afternoon. Looks and works great. Mine needed the "L" at the bottom but I was able to find some copper pipe fittings at HD that worked well. Used a narrow strip of weatherstrip around the barrel and it forms a tight bond with the bracket to hold in place. Not painting it. I like how it looks.
Really nice news.. you were one of the first to wade into the water and it's always good to hear news like this... How about posting a photo and what heat source you used... I too like the stark look of the brass. It doesn't sound like you were at all stumped. What about the kit did you like? I'd love to see the faces when you tell your friends YOU BUILT IT during COVID!! I feel the pride! Well done!
 

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How about posting a photo and what heat source you used... I too like the stark look of the brass. It doesn't sound like you were at all stumped. What about the kit did you like?
Stumped? No...its pretty straight forward once you understand how it works. I liked that everything needed (except the soldering equipment) was included. I used a friends propane plumbing torch. It was overkill. The flame was too large, especially around the areas that had already been soldered. If I had to do it again I would use a smaller soldering torch. My only suggestions to anyone assembling this would be to (1) Take your time and enjoy the process (2) Sand the curve into the top tube really well (3) Yes, you can really do it.
 

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Discussion Starter #106
Stumped? No...its pretty straight forward once you understand how it works. I liked that everything needed (except the soldering equipment) was included. I used a friends propane plumbing torch. It was overkill. The flame was too large, especially around the areas that had already been soldered. If I had to do it again I would use a smaller soldering torch. My only suggestions to anyone assembling this would be to (1) Take your time and enjoy the process (2) Sand the curve into the top tube really well (3) Yes, you can really do it.
Yeah!! i can't emphasize enough how it can be done with a cigar lighter and high heat is not your friend... A pencil butane is plenty and if you heat things up too much it just slows you down because it extends the wait to cool things down to handle between steps.. .That is the most time consuming part.. I used my Benrzomatic ( which every shop should have anyway) and then used a very teeny flame from a propane blue bottle on the bottom oil collector but it really wasn't necessary. The butane torches just need to be refilled often. thanks for your report!. .
 

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Discussion Starter #107
NEW SERVICE NETWORK!! EUROPE!!! Sold 53 units to date ....4 in Canada and 49 in the USA ....Europe (UK and EU) availability at $135 shipped USPS ..Finished Inventory is ready for IMMEDIATE shipment.
 

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Discussion Starter #110
I would really like you write your comments on your solder technique.. Seems there are folks still with a little apprehension on "welding" and think they need to enroll in a tech class to tackle it. I think the key is very small pencil torch, preparation, reading the instructions and patience. I surprised myself how easy it was. That is why I made it a kit.. to keep the cost down and save me time I already have too much invested just in fabrication. Anything I have ever tried (NOT THIS PROJECT) with Gorrilla glue or anything out of a tube was harder to make work. The solder is very nice. Well done! from MINNEHAHA!
 

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Glad to. Wish I took a video... You would have had several levels of failure and incompetence to see before I got it down.

Requirements as follows:
I used a creme brulee butane torch. The flux recommended by Rick. Solder I bought 60/40 tin lead, but had silver electrical solder already. Honestly with the heat from the torch, both worked about the same to my eye. The advantage of the silver is that it is not poisonous lead. Used simple steel wool and a metal brittle brush for cleaning. Need some way to clamp pieces together. I have a workbench that can sqeeze down to hold an item in place as well as a rudimentary clamp. Get work gloves: can actually hold fairly hot pieces with these on for a few seconds which is super helpful. Also plastic shield or safety glasses, and I used a mask ( you can't say you don't have one 😷).

1. Make sure pieces meet and fit nicely.
2. Make sure you can keep them in position without having to hold them using your clamps or positioning/ gravity.

3. Scuff up the edges to weld with the brush and then clean aggressively with the steel wool.
4. Slather on the flux with a small paint brush
5. Put the pieces together on the bench
6. Role out enough solder into a straight line so that your hands don't have to get too close.
7. Light the torch and heat the area for welding. Spend more time heating the larger piece as this will take more to get hot. If you don't do this enough the solder will not melt on contact and will just break off and fall to the ground or onto the material where you don't want it. This took me a while to figure out. I'd only heat about 2 cm of the planned length of weld at a time so it gets really hot.
8. Take the solder and touch it to the joint. If it doesn't melt it's not hot enough. If it does you can get it to melt into the seem more nicely with a little additional torching.
9. Make sure there are no gaps left and then move to the next section.
10. Any ugly beads or stuff that fell off onto the metal can be left alone or, once you are done you can melt them with the torch and position so that gravity allows them to bead and fall off. I think there are other ways to get rid of excess solder, but I don't know them.

Others do....

That's what I've learned though!

Rumi
 

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Discussion Starter #112
Silver solder takes more heat and I discourage it.... steel wool works, sand paper .. I prefer scotch-brite which leaves a cleaner surface,, a wipe down with solvent does the rest. I never had to use clamps. The intuitive way to solder cylinders is horizontally but I like it stacked vertically except for the top inlet pipe which I cradled the body of the unit in a vice and the dowel positioned it nicely and it kept it's position that way until the solder set up. .. Nice work and thanks for reporting in .
 

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A technique to clean up excess solder is to use a very wet rag and actually wipe the solder joint once you are done. This technique won't pull solder out of the joint but smoothes the surface and also cools the part. I have used this technique when soldering copper pipe for years. A second method is to use the flux brush (find these at the local DIY store) with a decent load of flux on it. This method will spread the hot solder around and blend areas together if you're working in sections. Just be careful the brush doesn't melt and contaminate the joint.

I find that when the flux has stopped bubbling is usually the point at which the joint is hot enough to take solder.
 

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Discussion Starter #114 (Edited)
Yep II found the flux "boiling" method a good test and a "prod" lightly with the solder stick to see if you have the temp up ..If right on it melts like a candle. .Once you have it it's rather easy to flash over the area with the flame to keep the temp up on the metal as you apply the solder.and move down the joint. The brass cools slowly and heats quickly so those factors are in your favor.. It is amazing how fast a piece of metal so small gets to temp. 365-400F and is all you need to keep the metal in the solder melt zone. The little npiples are done in a matter of seconds...The lids perhaps a minute or so...... once you get the right temp there is no rush to get the solder on because you have the torch to keep the temp where you want it. As for wiping down the joints, I'd resist that on such a small piece and a couple joints aren't nested Neatness can be handled cold on something like this...
 

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Spent a few hours yesterday assembling and pretty straight forward.Found oven gloves to be helpful when handling and did Jim's suggestion of the vise for the A and B soldering to work best.
Do have a question before soldering H .When I looked into the body of the OVC the brass media was slightly conical in shape sloping from edge of container to part H.Do I even H with upper media edge or the lower edge which is the closest to H?
Thanks
Larry
 

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Discussion Starter #116
Spent a few hours yesterday assembling and pretty straight forward.Found oven gloves to be helpful when handling and did Jim's suggestion of the vise for the A and B soldering to work best.
Do have a question before soldering H .When I looked into the body of the OVC the brass media was slightly conical in shape sloping from edge of container to part H.Do I even H with upper media edge or the lower edge which is the closest to H?
Thanks
Larry
No that isn't critical.. I just footnoted that so someone didn't lose track of where the top of H , the down draft tube was. In the original, the down draft tube had a flange rolled on the top edge as a stop to pull down against the media when they brazed the H tube in the bottom oil collector. They used 'feel" at the stop as their final location before brazing H to the collector because they had NO way to look inside to see where it was so the flange was their cue they were bottomed out home and they could braze in. It just so happens it was flush. The slight variation in the media level is inconsequential. There is 3 running lineal FEET of media rolled into that media chamber and it is leveled as best as possible with a set of tools as the wind up process will have some slight variance from one ply to the next and from one unit to the next... . Hope that all makes sense... The intention is to give you a guide..not a + or - tolerance..Use the center core as your guide . Thanks for asking.
 
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