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Discussion Starter #45 (Edited)
WEEKEND UPDATE: The interest is overwhelming THANK YOU ALL!!
I started this enterprise as a lark to fix my own OVS problem so I started with a scant amount of materials. All materials are USA sourced and availability is not been constricted by the virus.. I have enough primary raw goods to fill every order placed with one or two component exceptions.. You can't sell an assembly without all the parts. .So you ask.. WHAT IS THE PROBLEM? ANS: SHIPPING AND RECEIVING.. ask anyone on the street, not even Amazon Prime is NOT punctual these days and meet their promised deliveries.. UPS AND FEDEX are swamped. Rest assured, when I receive the goods the queue will dry up and all orders in will go out quickly. It will be as if Fenway Park opened the gates. everyone gets in like a river of humanity.. Trust me ..it is not a production delay...My wife hasn't got her yarn yet that was promised weeks ago. Life is complicated in the shipping business . The USPS has been the most reliable.

Test Market Status: The first two orders were shipped today ( Logan you got bumped to third... since you weren't going to tackle it right away..i hope you understand) JIM G is one of our esteemed contributors and he was right behind Logan for the first orders.. 1974SpiderinMont in CANADA is right with him on this test case.They should be reporting early findings next week.. PLEASE POST ON THIS THREAD ! Have a great summer day! Thanks
WEEKEND UPDATE (2) We are in full production and over the hump on raw materials. All the orders that are in up until this point are covered and more with stock and materials on hand. Expect anyone who has an order in up until this point to have their kit in their hands in the next 10-14 days. I am piece-mealing out messages to those in the queue when to pay and they should expect a turnaround of 24 to 48 hours for their shipment to go out. All will be shipped USPS and that has been the least sensitive to broken delivery promises during the virus surge in traffic and lost air traffic which influences deliveries. .. Stay tuned. The only delay now is a cool upgraded lid inspection port plug I came upon only yesterday that might delay a few shipments until the end of the week. It's a small item but critical to the package but it will work great and I just ordered the parts this morning from Michigan.. (I'm in Massachusetts). Amazingly, I have spent more time researching a PLUG that works than just about any other component on the unit. The 4th is a Sat. so it shouldn't hurt the delivery traffic and timeliness of your receiving your kits. If you have already paid just be aware this item is the only thing holding up your package because I just received proto-types in the mail yesterday afternoon.... but worth the few days wait. . I'm very optimistic about the prospects of the kit being accepted in the community as the BEST solution to a nagging, unsolved alternative to solving the problem posed by failure of OVS's. and a fun learning experience. I expect there will be reports coming in soon from folks who are trialing the kit.
 

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Full disclosure. I bought my kit from Rick and was inline with everyone else. He thought from my posts over the years. That I would be one of several to put the kit together and report feedback to him about putting it together, amount of time and skill needed. He asked me to report my honest opinions and results. So here it goes.

Skill. If you can work on your Alfa and or your house, furniture, etc., or like to learn new things. You can do it. Take your time, do your ( as my Industrial Arts teacher in high school called it that nasty word ) research.

I received my kit from Rick about 5 days ago. Spent a couple of hours basically just putting it together and taking it back apart referencing the instructions and getting familiar with all the parts. Not counting the first couple of hours. I think I have about 3 to 4 hours total of actually putting it together. Paragraphs are numbered and the number corresponds to the pictures in order starting with the second picture being number 1.

I used a MAPP torch, lead free solder and oil based flux. Mainly because this is what I had from replumbing my first house 30 years ago. Using the oil based flux eliminated the need to make sure the pieces were clean of oils. The MAPP torch I used was probably a little to big for doing this. Heats the parts much quicker then a butane. But harder to control temp as the flame is much bigger. I also used 180 grit emory cloth to sand all the joints as its what I had on hand. One piece of advice on flux. Do not be stingy putting it on. But don't put half the can on one joint either. Flux is what carries the solder into the joint. The heat only melts solder. Do not apply the heat directly to the joint. Heat the metal around above and below the joint. Keep touching the solder to the joint. As soon as it starts to melt freely remove the heat and move the solder around the joint. When the solder begins to stop melting apply more heat if your not done. When you get done and the joint does not stay together. Apply heat and use a thick fold rag to wipe the solder off. Then sand the last little bit off both sides of the joint and try again. Its not hard to solder pipes together. But like everything else it just takes practice. As Rick said there are plenty of videos on You Tube you can watch to learn how to do it. I would recommend especially for beginners is to get some good thick work gloves. Because the brass does take awhile to cool done. Also since some of the pieces are close together its best to wait and let the piece cool down before going to the next joint. Do not move the piecs for several minutes to give time for the solder to cool down. Moving right after soldering could cause the pieces to separate.

1. I put the 2 cups together A & B with the dowel F centering them. I choose to use a vice to hold most of the parts together so the solder would follow the joint around. I sanded the mating surfaces with the emory cloth and put flux on both pieces. Heated the cups up and applied the solder. I then used a pair of pliers to rotate the piece around 180 degrees to make sure the solder was all the way around. I reheated one part to fill in a small gap. I let it cool down enough to handle it by hand.

2. I then sanded the inside lip of cup B then also sanded the end of D that was going into Cup B. I did find that one end of D fit in to cup B better then the other. I then applied flux to both pieces were the solder would be going. I then soldered D into cup B. I soldered this with cup A resting on the flat of the vice.

I then filed a bevel on the edge of C towards the inside of the tube. Make sure you do this on the end closer to the hole. Use cup A to check your bevel to get a good fit between A and C.

3 & 4. This is not in Ricks instructions. But I took each screw out of the media one at a time and added 3 number 6 stainless steel flat washers under the head of each one. These are on the side of D. This lets the media can D center itself which also centers A to C making it easier for me to clamp in the vice and solder them together. To use the vice to do it like this. You will need to remove tube H and put a 3/4 diameter piece in there that does not stick out the end of the can C. I used a piece of wood 3/4 dowel I had around the shop. But anything that size will work. Socket, etc. When I pulled the tube out the media did not move. But be very careful if you decide to do it this way. I sanded the underside of cap A and the edge of can C and applied flux to both sides. I then put them together and clamped them in the vice. Then heated and soldered them. This one will take you sometime as you want to get the little bit of gap you have to fill in.

5 & 6. Once its completely cooled down. I moved on to soldering G to C. Using the big dowel to help hold it in place. This was the second time I did this. As I decide to solder this piece on before soldering cap A on. Thinking it would be easier. But when soldering cap A to C. The heat got to be to much for the solder holding G on and it fell off. Live and learn. You will need to do a little bit of sanding on the angle end of the tube G to get the curve to fit C better. But it does not need to be perfect. As the solder will fill in any small gaps. Use the big dowel to help hold the tube in the correct position. As with all the other pieces. Sand around were the pieces were the solder is going to go and apply the flux.

7. I then took cap E and sanded the inner lip, sanded tube H and the outside of C. Also sanded around the outside of cup E where tube H passes through. Then sand around the small hole in Cup E where you are going to install the shorter I tube. I then put E and H together, removed the wood dowel in the media and inserted the tube H into the media. You will have to move cup E up and down until you get tube H flush with the top on the media. You can look down the hole in cup A to see this. You can also use a small screwdriver to feel it the tube is flush with the media. Once the tube H is flush remove the assembly and put flux on both the inner lip of cup E and and tube C. Reinstall and rotate E so the small hole the tube I goes in lines up in relation to tube G as it does on your old one. I then clamped tube H in the vice. I also used a big socket to put some weight on it in case I bumped it to keep it from being knocked off. Solder them together. This one might take you a little bit of time as you might have to fill very small gaps whee the cup fits around the tube. Let it cool down.

8. Once its cooled down. Set it on its top and install the shorter tube I. I fitted this tube into the cup E before solder it on and marked the tube so I would know were to insert it back to. Apply flux around tube H and Tube I then solder them both at the same time.

9. The last building step. You will need to drill a hole into tube H to install the longer of the tube I. Mine went at a downward angle. so I used a center punch to mark the tube were to drill and and started to drill to the point were the outside edge of the bit was just starting to enter the metal. At this point you can tilt the bit to the angle you need and keep drilling. I grounded the end of tube I to the angle I needed so that it would not stick into the opening on tube H. Sanded both pieces. Inserted tube I into tube H and applied flux. Then soldered. You will notice I used a small screwdriver to apply some weight to hold tube I at its most downward angle in the hole.

You are now done. Congrats. After this you can now repair the plumbing in your house.

A couple of last points. These instructions are not intend to replace Rick's. They are intended to enhance them. You need to read both sets fully to get the full understanding. Please keep in mind that I have been doing these kind of things since I was 13. So a lot of it just comes to me naturally now.

Also I highly recommend that you have your old OVS on the bench next to you when you start soldering tubes G, boths I's and cap E on. So you get them in the right position. Yes. You can get tube G on backwards. Just ask Rick.

Just remember. YOU CAN DO THIS.

Remember in the immortal words of Red from the Red Green show. " If the women don't find you handsome. They should at least find you handy ".

See my next 2 post on the final pictures and cleaning.

Last but not least by any means. Many thanks To Rick for taking the time to figure this out.
 

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In these pictures you can see how everything looks and lines up on the finished OVS. This one of mine is from a 1969 model year. So if you have that year and are missing it. You can use this one for reference.
 

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Finally at last. Cleaning it up. You as the builder can decide how far you want to go with this. Or even if you want to do it at all. Its your can and your car. You are free to do what you want.

I choose to go all the way so that when painted it looks as close to the original as possible.

The first thing I did was to grind the lip sticking up on cup A. I did it with my wood working 6" by 48" stand up belt sander. If you have one of these. A worn out 60 grit belt works great for sanding soft metal like brass. I also used it to grind the side of the soldered joint of cup A flush with tube C.

After that I mounted it in the vice and used about a 2 inch wire wheel in the pneumatic die grinder to remove most of the excess solder sticking out on the rest of the joints. For large globs. You will need to file them down some. You can also use the wire wheel in a drill.

I then sanded to whole thing with 180 emory cloth, then 320 and finally 400. At this point its is ready to paint with a good cleaning. Or at this poiint you could begin buffing it to a brilliant luster then a good coat of lacquer to keep it from turning dull.

The time for doing this was another 45 minutes to a hour.

A word on safety. If you use a wire wheel. wear glasses or safety googles. It will throw pieces of wire off at you. Also if you have used solder with lead in it. Wear a mask or respirator. Breathing in lead is not good for you.
 

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Discussion Starter #51
Thanks Jim for your thorough and honest critique....You are the man !.. A note on your thoroughness of referencing the Alphabetical id's of the parts... UNFORTUNATELY, ,the readers don't have a clear notion of what A,B C ..G .. F et al are because they have no idea what my instructions are referring to WITHOUT HAVING THE INSTRUCTIONS BEFORE THEY RECEIVE THE KIT.. ...I'll come back to that subject.. Your point about skill level and time to complete is right on. I did not have ANY solder experience with a butane torch and completed my unit in an afternoon.... The part of the the process most time consuming is waiting for parts to cool between soldering the 8 different parts. In the words of Carly Simon.. ANTICIPATION..... it the most time consuming part of the assembly...the wait to cool between steps.

The instructions included in the kit will make make sense of the A-B-C's...parts Jim refers to. There are basically 9 parts from A to I and a full commentary on how they are to be assembled in the INSTRUCTIONS. The whole kit could technically be sent in an AMAZON PRIME envelope.

Last comment on solder.. MAPP is NOT an option to assemble unless you are a master at it using high temp MAPP. . The heat required to melt solder is under 400F.. Jim's experience level and technique with MAPP says you heat AWAY from the joint. I differ if you use the recommended butane torch in place of his MAPP.. With a pencil butane flame of a Bernzomatic Detail Torch you want to heat the joint and follow the flame with the solder. It's all about technique a;ll commented in the Kit included instructions...
 

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Thanks Jim for your thorough and honest critique....You are the man !.. A note on your thoroughness of referencing the Alphabetical id's of the parts... UNFORTUNATELY, ,the readers don't have a clear notion of what A,B C ..G .. F et al are because they have no idea what my instructions are referring to WITHOUT HAVING THE INSTRUCTIONS BEFORE THEY RECEIVE THE KIT.. ...I'll come back to that subject.. Your point about skill level and time to complete is right on. I did not have ANY solder experience with a butane torch and completed my unit in an afternoon.... The part of the the process most time consuming is waiting for parts to cool between soldering the 8 different parts. In the words of Carly Simon.. ANTICIPATION..... it the most time consuming part of the assembly...the wait to cool between steps.

The instructions included in the kit will make make sense of the A-B-C's...parts Jim refers to. There are basically 9 parts from A to I and a full commentary on how they are to be assembled in the INSTRUCTIONS. The whole kit could technically be sent in an AMAZON PRIME envelope.
Thats why I posted a picture of your labeled parts for people to use as a reference.
 

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Discussion Starter #53
Thats why I posted a picture of your labeled for people to uses a a reference.
ahhhhhh . I was just anticipating that some of the audience didn't catch the first half of the thread or missed the diagram. WHICJH IS INCLUDED IN THE INSTRUCTIONS> ... All is good...
 

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Discussion Starter #54
ALERT!!! SHIPPING ..I DIDN'T SPELL IT OUT IN MY POST #1 .... "The kit will be offered at $95 + Flat rate shipping Priority shipping in the US and appropriate freight elsewhere. " ... I will accept all prior payments up through today prior to this post , as final payment..Thanks guys!

So to make things easy .....1) if you pay with Paypal kindly send it to a "friend"..2) If you are paying with Paypal without a "kitty" .. please add the charges I have to absorb. I think it is like 5% for bank or credit card...3) If you aren't sure .. I accept personal checks to Richard Lesniewicz 1500 Old Post Road Marstons Mills MA 02648 as a follow up to your order placed, when I notify you your order is ready for post...4) Please don't PAY until I ALERT you your order is ready to ship. 5) ALL US orders will be $95 + $15,50 FLAT RATE PRIORITY regardless of where you ARE and what package or service it arrives in......Canada is US$95 + US$ 20 for all posts north of the border< COAST TO COAST. Tracking will be monitored and only used if the order is late. Thanks guys again.. I hope that makes everything easier and more straight forward and defined. as the interest and orders caught me little flat footed on this subject. .We are gearing up! I'll add the shipping to my For Sale forum post .
MY PAYPAL IS --- RLESN at COMCAST dot NET
 

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Discussion Starter #55
Richard,
Put me in queue to order after feedback from initial assembling group. I have a 1969 1750 Spider Veloce.
The doctor will see you now... You are ready to ship.. Please take the next step to pay as per POST #54. Thanks for your patience.
 

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First Impressions

JIm G has provided above much more detail of the kit and description of the assembly process, but I’ll post my impressions, being one of the early recipients. First of all, this is a beautiful collection of metal pieces (my wife the artist is admiring them). All needed parts are there, along with three pages of instructions and two illustrations. The wall thickness of the outer main-body tube is about 0.070” – this thing when assembled will be built like a brass sh*t house. A small amount of metal work is required: drilling a hole in the center tube for the small pipe nipple, and filing the already-cut hole in the outer tube for the large pipe nipple, to achieve a precise fit (solder doesn’t like to fill gaps). I will also de-burr everything, though that may not be strictly necessary. The brass mesh coalescing medium is already wound and assembled into its housing, so I don’t have to mess with that.
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The instructions include detailed recommendations for a torch, solder, and flux to use. Also included are two wooden dowels to hold pieces to together while soldering, for those of us without a heat-proof third hand. Richard has been very responsive about answering questions by email, and has already provided an updated set of instructions. He has also since made a late-breaking design change on the removable plug at the top; it is now a replaceable hollow rubber plug with a rivet inside:

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The only other point I can think of is that the diameter of the main body tube is about 0.100” smaller than the stock unit, so Richard recommends small rubber pads to take up the gap in the mounting bracket clamp. As mentioned in the thread, I have several other projects ahead of this in my queue so won’t be able to verify assembly and function any time soon. (Though if I need a diversion from cleaning 50-year-old grime from suspension parts, I may go ahead and assemble it sooner. We’ll see.)

My original plan was to paint it black when done to look more stock, but now am thinking maybe leave it polished brass.

All in all I’m happy with the purchase, and think it’s a great creative solution for an NLA part.
 

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Discussion Starter #59 (Edited)
This is some exciting stuff. That is a great write up @Jim G. @divotandtralee, I'll bet you are giddy over this! What a great gift to the community. Thank you for doing this.
The irony is how misunderstand and valuable this piece is in the mix on an Alfa of this vintage. .. I didn't realize it until I studied it's function. . After owning my car for two years I have come to conclusion there are THREE cures to all the futzing and diddling and hand wringing over a car like this. 1) SPICA : MAKE SURE IT WORKS 2) Early starters (.7HP) are a piece of crap .. RUN to a gear reduction starter NOW 3) Stop chasing fouled plugs; (poor starting), carbon-ed up valves, Filthy CHARCOAL black oil changes at 3000; lousy gas mileage; backfiring from carbon build up-- all theses things are related to an inoperative Oil Vapor Separator .. You know the one that looks like a toilet tank float! and you thought it must be some sort of emission "thingy" and those in-op intuitively are GOOD.. for the car.. It is just as important to an Alfa as the toilet tank float to a happy household .. I have learned one of the least understood pieces to a good running car and yet one of the most valuable is the OVS..How do you know yours is in-op.. Disconnect it from the oil return line to the sump and see if air passes through it. If air won't ,oil won't return. You are now driving with a paperweight in your engine bay...feeding BLOW-BY gasses and oil back to the engine's most critical area .. the combustion chambers.....It's like the old road draft tube of the 50's and 60's being connected directly to your intake manifold.U. PS I wish Papajam was alive he would second all of this.
 

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Sir, may I please be placed in the queue? I find this alternative fascinating and groundbreaking....and a work of art, to say the least...am still wondering if it'll be painted AR119, or polished brass? Thank you again for your engineering and passion for all Alfisti.

Eddie Gerlach
Tampa, FL
 
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