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'giulia spider sixteen00
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Discussion Starter #1
AR#374624
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'giulia spider sixteen00
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Discussion Starter #3 (Edited)
That is some stunning, corrosion? wow! Was removing the drum fun?
fun NOT ! had to use a flat punch to turn the 2 screws first then soak stud holes and screw holes for days with pbblaster and gradually move drum off. lots of sweat and cussin, some in Italian.
took over 4 hours to remove all 4 (with no damage !)

are the rusty drums fixable and can they be lathe-turned to cleaN THEM UP ??????????????
 

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'giulia spider sixteen00
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Discussion Starter #4
i put this brake together with new shoes in 1974, not opened since. my memory has faded, and i was SHOCKED and AMAZED at the huge weight of the drum. JEEZUS !

does anyone think the wheel cylinders can be saved (new seals of course) ?
 

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Yes I think everything can be saved. Pull it all to pieces and give them a big wash, maybe a sandblast and will look fine, maybe with minor pitting.

The metal linings of the drum might be a concern though because it looks like pitting has occurred so will there be enough lining left after turning?
Pete
 

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Brake Materials & Parts in Indiana ( Brake Materials & Parts ) are the experts on turning Giulia drums, relining the shoes, and arcing them to fit. You can ship all the pieces in two, large flat rate boxes.

The hardest part about this job (after getting off the old, corroded drums) is unscrewing the steel brake line fittings from the aluminum cylinders without breaking anything and getting the springs back on the shoes.
 

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when it is all finished, you can stand back and admire one of the most beautiful brake set ups ever designed....:)
 

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Richard Jemison
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The wheel cylinders are common Girling parts used on many Briddish cars.
 

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agree
but few cars have those gorgeous alfin drums unless you are talking Aston Martin, Bentley, AC and some other of the more common ;) 'Briddish iron' and you'd be hard pressed to find a normal car with those beautifully cast brake shoes, that's for sure.
 

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For future reference, when the front drums on a Giulietta are stuck, remove the little cap on the end of the hub & take the split pin & castle nut off, then pull the small tapered wheel bearing out & carefully set it aside. You will now find that you have a lot more wiggle room and the drum including the hub usually comes off fairly easily leaving the shoes neatly behind. You can then set the drum up on 2 blocks of wood on the work bench & apply PB blaster or similar + a bit of localised heat to the hub joint before tapping it with a block of wood & a large hammer. They usually separate fairly easily. The rears are a bit more challenging.

Yes the wheel cylinders can be saved, very pitted ones can be sleeved in stainless steel. The 3 shoe cylinders are unique to this set up & while Alfastop sell new repro ones, unless the threads for the pipes are badly damaged, you can successfully sleeve them in stainless. I've done it successfully with the 2 shoe cylinders & with the master cylinders.

As for the drums, clean the steel linings up with emery cloth, try not to have them turned if you don't absolutely have to as you really don't want to remove material here & any slight pitting which remains will most likely be insignificant & far more preferable than a cracked drum lining. Viewed in a slightly different light --> Any fractional loss of braking surface due to pitting on the 3 shoe drums will still undoubtedly still result in them having more braking surface than the standard 2 shoe set up which in their standard 2 shoe guise have a larger swept area than the brakes on a 300 SL Gullwing Mercedes, so our little cars are really well engineered in the brake department and for a standard road car you will find them more than adequate.

Ciao
Greig
 

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'giulia spider sixteen00
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Discussion Starter #11 (Edited)
^^^ brilliant !! thanks for your well-educated time.

yes, i knew i could remove the hub but didn't want to disturb bearings, preload, etc. if i didn't need to.

to remove drums (instead of prying against the backing plate) i used the claw of a carpentry hammer, which fits behind drum, and a rubber mallet against that to gradually work it off.
 

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In your shoes I would definitely strip the wheel bearings, wash out the old & by now very hard grease & inspect the races & rollers. You can get acidic pitting on bearings etc that stand for long periods, plus the grease will have hardened and most likely mud-cracked . Just like tarmac roads & enamel paint, the solvents eventually flash out of grease & it slowly goes hard after a long period. 10 years of standing on our '61 Ti was enough that I repacked the front wheel bearings. The hubs would barely turn the grease had become so hard.

Pre-load is simple, seat the tapered bearing by hand, screw the castle nut & washer up by hand bringing the castle nut up just into contact with the washer at the bearing, rotate the hub around & then tighten 1/8th of a turn and then loosen 1/16th of a turn. Check the hub for tightness by rotating it a few times, tighten 1/8th again & loosen 1/16th. Check that the hub doesn't rock from to to bottom & you are pretty much there, you might have to do the forward 1/8th and back 1/16th again - it's a case of educated feel... but not a difficult thing to do. There must be a you tube video on how to set front wheel bearings on a RWD car

Fit the split pin and you are set - if the pin won't fit, rather sand or file the back of the nut down a whisker then over tighten.

Ciao
Greig
 
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