Alfa Romeo Forums banner

1 - 13 of 13 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
8 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
Good evening everybody,
By way of introduction, my name is Angus. I'm a mechanically literate (but not fluent) individual who has just probably bitten off more than they can chew.
The title of this thread is alluding to both me on this forum, and the '71 1300GT Junior sitting in my shed. The business I run (and spend too much time in the office of) has just been shuttered given this pandemic, so it was fortunate that just before all that happened, I bought this car. Now is the perfect time for me to begin to tackle it. I'm new to Alfas (having always had BMWs as my fun cars) and have always lusted after a 105 but put them in the 'can't afford' basket. This car came up at an opportune time (and price), so I snapped it up and now intend to dive down the rabbit warren of learning about getting it going again.
I should preface this thread with the fact that I'm not interested in garage princesses or being worried about scratching them every time I walk past them (I have an M3 for that), and have a real appreciation of classics being used. As such, I'm very interested in retaining this car's patina and character (but am aware that further exploration into the body may mean it's just going to be better to have it media blasted and do a proper resto on it), whilst removing the rust in the sills, driver and passenger floors and in the (assumed) base of the A pillar. I hate the term 'rat rod', but heading in that direction with a rebuilt (and 'woken up') motor and refreshed brakes, suspension and driveline certainly has its appeal. The car came with a 1750 motor in it, but came with its original 1300 motor as well.
I'm comfortable with a TIG torch in my hand, but have no sheet metal experience (and am looking forward to learning). I have removed the 1750 motor and transmission and I'm about to build a rotisserie to put the car on to address the rust.

My initial questions in this (long-winded) first post are:
  • Does anybody happen to have any plans laying about for a rotisserie? On initial inspection, it appears my bumper mounts are sound, so should be fine to mount the car on (will this suffice my needs if I'm just doing floors, sills and the base of the A Pillar?)
  • If I do go for the 'maintain the patina' approach, I'll need to address/arrest the surface rust on the roof. Does anybody have suggestions for particularly good products/approaches for doing so?
  • I'm attracted to driving, and am not really into making this car a cruiser. I don't want to build a track car, but certainly want it to be a bit fizzy/clearly a driver's car. With this in mind, is the 1750 motor the one to focus my attention on (with the addition of cams, a flowed head and maybe a raise in compression) with it being the halfway between the 1300 and 2000 motors, or will the 1300 be a more exciting motor in terms of being revvier etc?
Will be glad to hear your thoughts!

Cheers,

Angus

1621777
1621778
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
219 Posts
for Rotisserie design, there are a few options. I would not recommend mounting to bumper mounts, they are not stout at all. Mounting to the suspension points will have the car under the same stress if sitting on the ground and they are stout.
Check out my thread to see pictures of how I did my rotisserie. I"m still quite happy with it, mostly because it packs away fairly tidy and only cost $400.
1968-1750-gtv-race-car-build

Looks like a good starting point for a project and yes, run it with the 1750 and keep the 1300 in case you ever sell the car.

Welcome to the AlfaBB. Exciting times await you.
Mark
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
8 Posts
Discussion Starter #3
for Rotisserie design, there are a few options. I would not recommend mounting to bumper mounts, they are not stout at all. Mounting to the suspension points will have the car under the same stress if sitting on the ground and they are stout.
Check out my thread to see pictures of how I did my rotisserie. I"m still quite happy with it, mostly because it packs away fairly tidy and only cost $400.
1968-1750-gtv-race-car-build

Looks like a good starting point for a project and yes, run it with the 1750 and keep the 1300 in case you ever sell the car.

Welcome to the AlfaBB. Exciting times await you.
Mark
Really appreciate the response Mark! Just had a very quick glance at your thread, and the rotisserie looks great! Super compact. I'll have a read in-depth and may well hit you up with a few questions. It certainly does make sense to attach to the suspension points, though.
Thanks,
Angus
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
8 Posts
Discussion Starter #4
Adding to my list of questions, the attached image is of the stamping on the block of the (assumed) 1750 motor that came in the car. I’ve had a dig through the postings of Tutte Le dal 1910 on this site, and seem to think it’s a ‘68. Are my musings correct?
1622321
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
8 Posts
Discussion Starter #6
I like the hoop rotisserie design. It picks up the body at the suspension points.

Regarding the motor, nothing against the 1750 but you'll get far more bang for your buck going with a 2L motor.
Thanks for weighing in GP, do you like it because it means avoiding building in pivots to rotate the frame?

RE ‘Bang for buck’: do you mean ‘performance’? Part of the appeal of this build for me is actually being able to ‘use’ a motor without it putting me in jail. Rather than big torque and HP figures, I want something that revs cleanly and really lets you know about it when it comes on song. I think something like this car is going to feel a lot more agile than the heavier sports cars I’m used to driving. I want more visceral feel and noise than power. Surely the 1750 will provide this with the usual airflow mods?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
716 Posts
Ciao Angus,

Yep, good timing for a resto project.
Here's another link for a simple chassis tilter which is really all you need:


With regards to a panel rust inhibitor whilst restoring, I suggest a product known as Paintgrip 253 (Keyfos) by Henkel.
Note that you've got months worth of reading on this forum which is available via the search function.

Good luck
Saluti
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
763 Posts
Hi Angus,
welcome to the bb, 1750 is 68 as you said, car looks very straight from the pics you posted. we would love to see more. the 2 litre makes the car a great drive and the 1750 is very sweet, it depends how much you want to spend, have a look at sketchl's thread on fitting a twin spark to his 105. there is plenty of 105 owners in OZ so reach out if you need help. post lots of photos please.

cheers ian
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
8 Posts
Discussion Starter #9
Hi all, thanks for the responses, and input. There has been some (badly shot) progress since the last post. I should also mention that this project is being undertaken as a bit of a way to spend time with a terminally ill father (brain tumour). As such, it's being done in the family's shed, which is less than ideal, but so is life sometimes.

Since last checking in, I've pulled the motor and transmission:
1625763
This all went smoothly, without any major issue, and seems to have revealed an engine bay without any glaring issues (crossmember and radiator supports both appear to be sound).
The tagging and bagging process is well underway.

I've also begun on a rotisserie, combining inputs from a number of BB members, and other sources. Both ends are complete, and I've come to a logical stopping point on the fab process while I disassemble the car further to get measurements on suspension pickup points, and remove weight from the thing to make it safe for rotisserie-mounting.
1625764

1625765

Castors fitted, and much more convenient to move about now. Reckon I'll follow Mark's lead in terms of mounting points. The four-legged apprentice has been little help thus far.

As you can see, somebody has undertaken a closed-door respray on the car at some point, which was done poorly, and has resulted in cracking and pitting throughout. I know it's an insult to the purists, but I'm still attracted to the idea of retaining that look (minus the rust), but having a mechanically-sorted example underneath. Again, this may well change when the causes of the cheap respray are unearthed and are properly rectified.

Last job last night was to remove the windscreen (which fortunately came pre-cracked, for my convenience), by cutting the rubber and removing the aluminium trim. The glass came out easily, and will be retained along with the cut rubber for any mounting mock-ups I need to do along the way. These will be required, given what was revealed under the seal:
1625767

1625768
1625769
'Scuse the poor light, these were taken later last night, as I was succumbing to the cold in the shed. These areas obviously look concerning, but I'm really looking forward to tackling the repair of these. It's all a learning process for me, and is exactly what I signed up for when I bought the car.

Today's plan is to finish the interior stripping, and remove as much exterior trim as possible. I'm getting really good at putting off the removal of the suspension and everything under the car. I've got the requisite bits to make up some spring compressors for their safe removal, so if I'm (un)lucky, I'll get to that today too, but I reckon there are enough jobs on the top of the car to keep me safe for another day ;)
Cheers,

Angus
 

·
Administrator
Joined
·
12,570 Posts
Sorry to read about your father. Great that you can share this time together. Lost my mother last December due to pancreatic cancer, should have worked on my GTV more so she could have seen it at least painted, but cars were only an interest to her, not an obsession like Dad and I.

Car looks not too bad, and you look very capable with nice progress on the rotisserie
Pete
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
8 Posts
Discussion Starter #11
Thanks a lot Pete. It's been a nice way to spend time with my Dad, doing something that we 'always hoped' to do, so there's some silver lining in that, I think.
We've got the interior, and most of the body completely stripped now, with parts catalogued and photographed, so we're ticking along nicely there. More photos to come when we have it up on the rotisserie.
As seals around windows have come up, and a few closer looks have been taken in other spots, it's revealed more horrors lurking beneath (rust, not accident damage), but it don't think these are placing the car in the 'too hard' basket. I'll do a full photo journal of the areas of concern once it's on the rot', as much as for my memory as for others to cringe at.
Now, in regards to this roof. This rust is all looking 'surfacey', and I've captured the area of deepest pitting here. Bearing in mind that I'm a complete new-comer to panel work (and thus don't even really know what terms to use to search the forum with), what would be considered 'best practice' here? Luckily the car is in a dry, inland area here, so there's no great risk of the rust progressing, but it's irksome to look at. Is it a matter of very gently hitting this with a wire wheel to remove the flakier particles, and then using a rust converter to stabilise things? Or should a rust converter be used first? Just a little unsure about order etc.
1626728
Thanks again,
Angus
 

·
Administrator
Joined
·
12,570 Posts
Hmmm, that looks nasty. Not sure what to recommend

Pete
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
279 Posts
Hi , I would suggest getting to the area on the roof with a flap disk on the angle grinder, go to Bunnings or buy them online, they come in different grit level. I think around 120 grit to begin with and if that is not aggressive enough try 80 grit. There is a lot of dust produced so where a good mask, if you could rig up a vacuum even better. You could do the car this way another way would be to hand strip with paint stripper, now the air temperatures are lower you will have less evaporation and more activation this would be a good way. The other way is to have the shell media blasted, panel damage is possible unless the blaster is super careful, you could strip the panels and just have the engine bay, door apertures and window apertures blasted, and if the floors are shot, just cut them out don't bother stripping them. If the floors are restorable then you may want to strip both the inside and the underneath, the blaster won't get the thick under-body stuff off easily, it may cost a lot more for that part not sure about it. My two cent take on it, and good luck to you both.
Tim
 
1 - 13 of 13 Posts
Top