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Discussion Starter #1
I have been having trouble with intermittent starting problems. Every five or six times the engine just will not catch. After a minute or so of cranking it would usually start. Doesn't matter if engine is cold or hot.
I am in initial stages of t-shooting.
I have verified adequate fuel pressure at rail. Pressure actually rises quite rapidly.
I then turned to electrical issues. I measure voltage to cold start valve while cranking engine. Some very interesting observations.
Keep in mind I have fresh and verified battery.
When I initially start cranking the CSV voltage will start at 5.5 or so and slowly rise as I crank for five or so seconds to about 8.0 vdc. I give it a few seconds and start again. This time the voltage starts initially at a higher value (maybe 6 or 7 vdc) and climbs even more. After about the third time of cranking, the measured voltage will rise yet again and, when it eventually hits the 10.0 vdc mark, the car will start - every time.

I'm thinking this 10 volts is some kind of threshold voltage that is required for some ignition component to work.

There is no significant voltage drop at battery terminals during starting.

So the question is where is the voltage drop occurring?

Even with thirty plus years of fooling around with cars (foreign and domestic), this has me totally baffled.

Like I say, I'm in intial stages of t-shooting and welcome any thoughts.

Thanks guys,
Warren
 

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Discussion Starter #4
Results are in

This is also posted in the Spider forum.

:)I didn't want to post this until I had a few days of testing. I think issue is resolved. And it appears battery was issue - however in a very unusual manner.

I think my battery had one totally dead cell and five very healthy cells. Let me explain.

I never suspected the battery. The headlights would barely dim while cranking starter (a pretty good indication of amperage pull on battery). Hence at this point I didn't see cause to put my DVM on battery. Of course I would have down it a little further down the t-shooting flowchart. However I had basically started t-shooting fuel system first.

Like I said before, after seeing the 2007 date code on battery, I immediately replaced it. Now the car will fire up instantly. I can now drive it worry-free (well almost).

The lessons learned here are

1. A ten volt battery will give you some fairly bright headlights.

2. A ten volt battery is enough to turn motor. The headlights didn't dim much either when starting.

3. These forums are invaluable as nothing beats the experiences of a bunch of gearheads who enjoy sharing information.

Thanks,
Warren:cool:
 

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