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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
I replaced my clutch slave cylinder just after I got it, as it was leaking and I re-bled it recently just as another precautionary flush (PO just had a piece of tape over the reservoir) to make sure all the old debris was removed.
So, I may be making an issue out of nothing, but I believe the pivot arm should stay in the center of the bell housing opening, but its not.
There seems to be enough play in it that I can move it all the way to the up and if I center it, over time it drops back down again and it looks like the end of the fork spring rubs on the bell housing.
Any thoughts? Is there possibly just an issue with the way the spring was installed?
Thanks,
Les
 

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Yep- you're onto something-- the pivot arm ought to stay aligned in the center of the hole. I can see by the boot on the slave cylinder and the pushrod that something's misaligned. The slave cylinder cannot misalign because it registers in the mounting hole through the bellhousing. Look into the bellhousing and see of the pivot arm's slipped off its ball pivot, or if the ball fitting's bent or broken. And put a dab of grease on the end of the pushrod where it sits in the cup. It will leak again because the misalignment is causing a side thrust on the piston of the slave cylinder. In fact, the bore of the cylinder may already be scored and making it impossible to seal.

I don't know if you've tried them, but a speedbleeder make a heck of a difference when you're bleeding that slave cylinder! Try them if you haven't already.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
i had the front wheel off (jack stands for safety) and got as good of a look that I could and the pivot is in place and I did use some white lithium grease.
My intuition is the other end is screwed up, causing the problem. Based on how jacked up this car was from the PO, nothing would surprise me.
If this is the issue, is it possible to replace the clutch fork without completely removing the transmission?
 

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If this is the issue, is it possible to replace the clutch fork without completely removing the transmission?
I've never tried removing the fork with the bellhousing in place, but my guess is "no", the fork won't come out. Or if you got it out, it would be impossible to re-attach the clips that hold the fork to the T-O bearing and to the pivot.

How well does your clutch work? Are there any symptoms other than seeing an offset T-O fork when you get under the car?
 

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Sorry, its not possible to remove the fork without removing the bell housing which means you need to pull the transmission.

The flywheel blocks the open end of the bell housing and the fork is too big to come out the side hole.

As well as the reasons mentioned above.

I do think you are on to something about the alignment.

Here is what mine looks like. Pretty well centred.
IMG_7768.jpg

Good luck,

Vin
 

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Before I did anything else, I'd get that Spider up on a lift where you can get a good look at it.. inside the bellhousing. That clutch fork is not right, and there's a reason why it's misaligned. There's a good amount of pressure on that fork holding it against the throwout bearing face, so it will be hard to tell if the pivot ball is bent or broken unless you can get a pry bar in there and check it.

What of the PO had let the car sit, and the clutch froze up? And let's say he tried to force it? That could maybe bend or damage something, right? (not to mention the pedal pivot arm) Just a hypothesis...
 

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I've actually got exactly the same problem. The hydraulics of my clutch leak sometimes. When I was investigating the problem I found the same kind of misallignment between fork and slave cylinder. I guess that explains my heavy clutch pedal and the leaking problem. Does someone have a kind of exploded view drawing with the ball pivot you're talking about? I have troubles visualising the problem.
 

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Right-- if you have a heavy clutch effort on a 105 or 115 Alfa, you got a problem. Those stock clutches, when everything's in order, are nice and light.

Don't forget the OEM hose to the slave cylinder that delaminates on the ID, creating an orifice effect and putting extra stress on the pedal pivot arm!
 

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I'm pretty shure my clutch is heavy because the fork is too deep into the bell housing.
Some one sayd the fork might have popped of the pivot ball. Could this be the case? He also mentioned that it might be doable to pull the pivot back onto it's ball without having to take transmission out. Can this be done?
 

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Some one sayd the fork might have popped of the pivot ball. Could this be the case? He also mentioned that it might be doable to pull the pivot back onto it's ball without having to take transmission out. Can this be done?
If all that was wrong was that the throw out fork had fallen off the ball, then yes, it could be manipulated back on.

However, there is a spring clip that holds the fork to the ball. It would be impossible to re-install that clip with the bellhousing attached to the engine. And without that clip in place, the fork is likely to fall off again.

But go ahead and try - even if it just works for a short time, you will have learned something about the problem.

A bent or broken pivot ball, or worn fork are two other possible reasons for the symptoms you describe.
 

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To clear up a few things posted.

Alfa quit using the spring that holds the throw out bearing to the fork in 74 or 75. So don't worry about not having it.

If the spring holding the clutch fork has both ends on it the it is probably good. They can be put on upside down and they won't hold the fork on correctly or if the inside end isn't in the slot on the fork then the fork won't be held in place on the pivot ball.

Now the good news is with you can install the fork on the spring with the trans in the car. You will need to remove the slave from the bell housing to give you working room. It will probably take you awhile to do it but it can be done. If the spring is on upside down it can be removed and flipped over and put back on without removing the trans. But you will need long reach hemostats and long reach needle nose pliers and a lot of time and patience. If you drop it in the bellhousing a long reach magnet should fish it out. Once you get the fork on correctly you will need to take a long screwdriver and turn the throw out bearing so that the fork will drop down on either side of the flat area on the throw out bearing. Hopefully someone on here can post some good pictures of the parts.

The bad news is if its been this way for a while the fork and or the ball could be damaged and need replacing. the throw out bearing could also be damaged where the fork engages it.
 

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Throw out the throw out spring

Alfa quit using the spring that holds the throw out bearing to the fork in 74 or 75. So don't worry about not having it.
Now I know why Alfa quit using C-shaped springs to clip the throwout to the clutch fork - unreliable fitment.

When I pulled the gearbox out of my 1988 Spider a few months ago to rebuild it, I noticed that the thrust bearing didn't have one of those spring clips designed to hold the throwout snug to the clutch forks.

While sourcing other parts for my gearbox project, I decided to buy one of those C-shaped springs and give it a try when I re-installed the gearbox. It was only a couple of bucks and I thought it might improve the operation, or extend the life, of the clutch.

After bolting the bellhousing to the assembled half cases today, and figuring out the proper orientation of the C-shaped spring, I routed the "C" into the groove of the bearing and shoved the loop ends into the depressions on the back of the fork tines. I was then able to slide the whole assembly into place without much trouble.

But after checking the operation of the clutch fork a few times, half of the C-spring popped out of the notch in the bearing. I re-seated it and manually activated the fork a few more times - pop! The "C" portion came out of the bearing slot again! The loop ends stayed firmly in place on the fork tines, but I just couldn't get the long section of the spring to stay tightly wrapped in the bearing groove.

Not wanting to consider what kind of havoc that spring could wreak bouncing about inside the bellhousing after I bolted it up to the engine and was cruising down the highway, I decided to re-assemble the thrust bearing and forks the way I found them: without the fancy spring clip.

If you've got a 115, and are considering using one of these little springs, make sure the fit is solid in the bearing notch. Operate the fork several times and verify that it doesn't start working itself loose. Do this before you go to the trouble of re-installing the gearbox, as there seems to be some risk involved in using these springs, and tranny R&R's are not much fun.

Now all I have to do is keep the throwout on the shaft, and the bearing flats in alignment with the forks, while I try to muscle the gearbox and bellhousing up to the engine block (solo) from below. Wish me luck.
 

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Discussion Starter #15
Finally got around to pulling the transmission last week. I rolled it out on a little dolly from under the car and as soon as I slightly moved the release bearing everything fell apart, but nothing appeared to be broken.
So I honestly don't know what the issue was, but the release bearing was starting to squeal, so it was a necessary evil to get this transmission removed. The input shaft that the bearing slides on was also very dirty and the bearing did not glide smoothly.
I have been trying to reenact the crime, but I guess without the the resistance of the pressure plate coming into play, the fork seems to fully sit on the ball and the bearing sits correctly into the fork for proper movement.
However, I am seeing some additional/abnormal wear marks on the back side of the bearing where the fork seems to have been pivoting on an incorrect position and that I don't understand.
The main marks have the blue arrows and are relevant to the correct pivot movement and the other pivot points have the red arrow.
Anyways, another good learning lesson and I'll get the new bearing here in a week or 2. Thankfully the clutch is next to brand new and the flywheel and pressure plate all look in very good condition.
Thanks,
Les
 

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Discussion Starter #17
It was there, but it's in sad shape and appears disfigured... I tried to bend it a bit and it just broke, the metal was quite fatigued.
That will certainly be replaced along with the bearing.
R/
Les
 
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