Alfa Romeo Forums banner

1 - 14 of 14 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
57 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
So I'm waiting for my parts to arrive so I can re-assemble my water pump, and I'm thinking it's time for a purely cosmetic treat for the new car. I'm mostly focused on driveability and reliabilty for this driver, and cosmetics are secondary but definitely important. I'm not a skilled body man or mechanic, definitely "shade-tree" but I'm game to tackle just about anything. This is not a "how-to", as much as it is a "how I did it".

So, my front bumper is made from some foam rubber product. There's a couple "bites" in it that have sort of formed mouths that probably open at speed and catch bugs perhaps. A little unsightly and shoud be an easy enough fix.



Rawr! Feed me!


When the mouth is closed it isn't flat either.


I used a razor and removed just a little bit of foam from the flaps until they sit flush when pressed back into place. I also used some air to blow out the debris from inside of course.

The 3M bumper repair "kit". By "KIT" they mean a tube of black epoxy resin and a tube of hardener. That's the whole KIT.



I sanded around the area and used some wax & grease remover on the insides and periphery of the repair area. I mixed up equal parts of the resin and hardener and then applied it like an adhesive to the insides of the "mouths" and a little on the cracks around them.

I set up some clamps to apply some gentle pressure as the epoxy cured.


In about 40 minutes, the epoxy was hard enough for sanding. So I sanded the whole thing down using my 1/4 sheet palm sander. The results from the adhesive stage were great! Some small gaps in places around the former "mouths" that would require a second coat of epoxy.



I mixed up another batch and using the plastic spreader filled in the cracks the best I could and let it stand for another 45 minutes or so.



Once hardened, I hit the bumper with the sander again and was quite pleased with the smooth results.




...next up - Paint!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
57 Posts
Discussion Starter #3
I looked at trying to remove the bumper and that seemed like a lot of unecessary work. This is just supposed to look good from 10ft+. So I sanded down the rest of the bumper and blew it down with air.

I used the same wax and grease remover that I used on the "mouths" to wipe down the entire bumper.


I have a 48" high roll of masking sticky plastic stuff. So I quickly masked off the front end leaving the foam rubber bumper exposed. Of course I had rolled the car back inside first.



All ready for a squirt! So the stuff I used was just a rattle can of bumper paint.



I'm sure there's a better product out there, but this said "bumper" right on the can so how bad could it be?

A few coats from the rattle can and it looked pretty good. I managed about 3 solid coats and only used abot 1/2 the can I reckon. You can still see the "smiles" of the former "mouths" a little when you look up close, but it's a vast improvement and satifies the 10ft+ rule.




A little before and after side by side.


Well, time to go pick up the parts and get that water pump re-installed. Detour ended. Thanks!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,429 Posts
Very Nice, I have borrowed a friend's plastic welder and I am going to takle the underbumper bodywork on my '86 Quad, it has one big rip, a chunk in the conrer is missing, and a crack on either side of the tail pipe. I hope it turns out as well as yours!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
125 Posts
This is a very helpful thread, thanks. I'm going to follow this process on my car.

At the risk of hijacking this thread, what does the bracket look like that supports the bottom of the chrome hart under the bumper?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
125 Posts
I followed this method with limited success. The bumpers look great from ten feet away; move closer and the failings can be seen.

A few notes.

1. Only use the minimum epoxy to do the repair. Excess epoxy is tough to fully remove and changes the surface texture which is very apparent after paint.

2. This method depends heavily upon the skill of the person doing the work. As I'm unskilled my results were only fair. It took about three hours to do both bumpers. Still, I'm happy with the results and glad I did it.

3. 3M offers the epoxy in a two compartment syringe, far easier to dispense.

4. One of the spray cans of paint was defective, so buy extra and return the surplus.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
282 Posts
Vic, thanks for bringing this back up to the top. I've been hangin' here a few years, but I missed this thread. My bumpers are overall pretty good -- bought my Spider off the original owner, a gen-u-ine little old lady -- but I do have a small chunk taken out of the top surface of the rear bumper, and this seems like a good method.

It's been a while since I was down there, but I believe the lower half of the heart attaches directly to the sheet metal under the bumper. The heart has three studs on it that pass through the sheet metal, and it attaches with very small nuts, 8 or possibly even 6mm.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
2,608 Posts
Good job! Like how you did it.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
125 Posts
rxmar23 and alfasrule, thanks for the positive feedback. This job was way out of my comfort zone and glad it's done. This thread is a real oldie but a goodie; hopefully by dusting it off others can benefit from it.

rxmar23, I need to fabricate a bracket to support the bottom of the heart. I don't think it attaches to sheet metal as the body curves away from the heart. Perhaps I can bother you or other S2 owners to post a few photos? This will be very helpful.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
282 Posts
I'll see if I can get a photo in the next day or two, but the heart does follow the curve of the sheet metal. It's nowhere near vertical, if that's how you're thinking it should be.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
700 Posts
This is a very helpful thread, thanks. I'm going to follow this process on my car.

At the risk of hijacking this thread, what does the bracket look like that supports the bottom of the chrome hart under the bumper?
It's okay to hijack. This is a four year old thread.

There's a picture showing the lower grille bracket on my '77 about halfway down this thread that I wrote about collapsing our ugly rubber bumpers.

http://www.alfabb.com/bb/forums/spider-1966-up/201755-how-collapse-your-ugly-rubber-bumpers-recess-your-front-license-plate.html
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
26 Posts
Thanks Chill, took your idea of the flushing and silicone to remedy my gaping 1978 rear bumper, but still had a waivey bottom lip where the metal strip goes, even after clamping it tight. I took a router and built a jig to cut away the crooked lower edge while using the straight upper edge as my guide. I bought a "chrome" strip from the auto parts store measuring 1 1/2" wide and siliconed it into the new groove I created. Anchored the ends with a stainless screw. Not perfect, but meets the 10 foot rule you mentioned, and gives it a cleaner look.
 

Attachments

·
Registered
Joined
·
57 Posts
Discussion Starter #14
Nice Kam tail!

I think my metal strip is long gone on the rear bumper and it also has a few small bites, maybe I'll give that a shot this winter. I'll add it to the list!

Thanks memorse
 
1 - 14 of 14 Posts
Top