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tremere613 -

Vick sold me an aluminum radiator that didn't fit, and ignored my email with photos and explanation to their 'customer service'. Vick's owner (he's on this BB) ignored my PM about his radiator, too.

Cut you losses dealing with Vick.

David O'D
Laguna CA
 

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What if I add a fuel safe hose to the “inner outlet” which should reach the bottom of the tank: And then have the facet pump routed to the top of the fuel sender:
That sending unit is for an '86 - '93 Alfa (see FL030 FUEL SENDER - INJECTION SPIDER 1986-93 (AND SPICA INJECTED CARS)). One problem I anticipate adapting that sender to your '73: If you put a hose, or a 90 degree fitting on the tube coming vertically out from the sender, it is going to create a bulge in your trunk mat. And you won't be able put a suitcase or something else heavy in that part of the trunk, since it might crimp your fuel line. If you want to take the fuel out the top, a better solution is the correct sender which has its outlet tube bent 90 degrees and a pick-up long enough to reach the bottom of the tank. See Classic Alfa's p/n FL003:



Anyone know where this should be connected? I’m guessing the connector next to it???
Yes, I would guess so too. 1973 Alfa fuel senders just have two terminals (like the one pictured above): one for the gauge and one for the warning light. That Vick sender has three; the extra one appears to ground the sender through that mystery connector. So yes, hook it to the tab on the tube and then run a ground wire to the corresponding connector at the top of the sender.

I have no idea where to go from here. 1. Return Vick tank? 2. Drill a hole at the bottom of the Vick tank and have someone weld an outlet???
We've all been there, so I'm not saying "I told you so". But remember in post #5 when I said that the $200 that you expected to save by buying the Vick tank, instead of cleaning your old one, would get eaten up by tax and shipping? I guess I should have added the cost of modifications like this to that list. There's a lot to be said for restoring original parts, rather than buying modern "replacements".

It's your call, but you might see if you can return that incorrect tank and sender, pay to have your old tank cleaned and buy the correct sender from Classic Alfa. Yes, a few bucks more, but those parts should fit and operate like new.
 

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Discussion Starter #23
Yes, you can do that. The Facet pump should have enough suction to pull the fuel up and out of the tank as long as you locate it near the tank (not underhood) and down low. Still, a fuel outlet at the bottom of the tank would have made vapor lock virtually impossible.

One problem with that sending unit: If you do put a hose, or a 90 degree fitting on that tube coming vertically out from the sender, it is going to create a bulge in your trunk mat. And you won't be able put a suitcase or something else heavy in that part of the trunk, since it might crimp your fuel line. Sending units designed for Alfas have their outlet tubes bent 90 degrees and their pick-ups long enough to reach the bottom of the tank.



Yes, I would guess so too. Stock Alfa fuel senders just have two connections: one for the gauge and one for the warning light. That Vick sender has three; the extra one appears to ground the sender through that mystery connector. So yes, hook it to the tab on the tube and then run a ground wire to the corresponding tab at the top of the sender.

Thank you!
 

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That sending unit is for an '86 - '93 Alfa (see FL030 FUEL SENDER - INJECTION SPIDER 1986-93 (AND SPICA INJECTED CARS)). One problem I anticipate adapting that sender to your '73: If you put a hose, or a 90 degree fitting on the tube coming vertically out from the sender, it is going to create a bulge in your trunk mat. And you won't be able put a suitcase or something else heavy in that part of the trunk, since it might crimp your fuel line. If you want to take the fuel out the top, a better solution is the correct sender which has its outlet tube bent 90 degrees and a pick-up long enough to reach the bottom of the tank. See Classic Alfa's p/n FL003:





Yes, I would guess so too. 1973 Alfa fuel senders just have two terminals (like the one pictured above): one for the gauge and one for the warning light. That Vick sender has three; the extra one appears to ground the sender through that mystery connector. So yes, hook it to the tab on the tube and then run a ground wire to the corresponding connector at the top of the sender.



We've all been there, so I'm not saying "I told you so". But remember in post #5 when I said that the $200 that you expected to save by buying the Vick tank, instead of cleaning your old one, would get eaten up by tax and shipping? I guess I should have added the cost of modifications like this to that list. There's a lot to be said for restoring original parts, rather than buying modern "replacements".

It's your call, but you might see if you can return that incorrect tank and sender, pay to have your old tank cleaned and buy the correct sender from Classic Alfa. Yes, a few bucks more, but those parts should fit and operate like new.
I agree reuse all the parts you can. If the tank is rust holes in it. Call APE and get a good used one.


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Here is what is going on, if you put your old tank and the new tank side by side you will notice that the filler neck to the original tank is close to the edge of the tank whereas the new tank has it further in. Note also that the vent lines are different. Look at gt205 on the Centerline site. Note that the pickup line is mounted in a welded in cutout at the bottom of the tank. As for the sender, note that the wire you speak of is for a pre pump installed in the later tanks. I understand that this is the only sender available now and if you have the older setup, you blank off this fitting. Go to YouTube and search Alfa Romeo spider fuel tank and look for videos for International Auto parts and it will clear up how this sender works on the later cars. I was curious about Vick Auto parts as far as quality and service. I was thinking of the seat covers. Half the price of everyone else, but remember the old saying "you get what you pay for".
 

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Discussion Starter #26
In case anyone was wondering what the fuel looked like in my tank:


Even the suction device I used got gunked up:
 

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I think he means the sender for the Spica bottom feed tanks which is NLA.

Classic Alfas ones are the ones used for the carbed cars which were all top feed tanks.
 

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Discussion Starter #31
Options I see so far (I have no idea if they will work):

1. Centerline


2. Flexible fuel hose:
 

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Have you tried restoring your tank? it's not that hard if the metal is still pretty solid. I mean DIY...not a shop

wash it out good, get all the loose crud out. put some gravel in or bunch of old nuts and bolts and shake it around a lot. It will knock out more loose rust and stuff. I mean really shake it good. most all your problem areas are gonna be on the bottom. dump it all out and rinse it good and drain it. now treat it chemically. You can get a gallon of Ospho (maybe $10-20) at Home Depot or similar stores and pour it in and slosh it around. It's phosphoric acid based (just like Coca Cola) and will neutralize and eventually dissolve all the rust. Vinegar works well on rust too and is a lot cheaper ($2-3 gal)but doesn't leave a "primer like coating". Maybe use bulk vinegar to start then drain and rinse with Ospho, drain and let dry for a few days. Finish with fuel tank coating/sealer. Eastwood or another good brand. You just pour it in your cleaned tank and roll it around to coat and seal the entire inside. You can do the whole thing for well under $50 I think.
 

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Have you tried restoring your tank? it's not that hard if the metal is still pretty solid. I mean DIY...not a shop

wash it out good, get all the loose crud out. put some gravel in or bunch of old nuts and bolts and shake it around a lot. It will knock out more loose rust and stuff. I mean really shake it good. most all your problem areas are gonna be on the bottom. dump it all out and rinse it good and drain it. now treat it chemically. You can get a gallon of Ospho (maybe $10-20) at Home Depot or similar stores and pour it in and slosh it around. It's phosphoric acid based (just like Coca Cola) and will neutralize and eventually dissolve all the rust. Vinegar works well on rust too and is a lot cheaper ($2-3 gal)but doesn't leave a "primer like coating". Maybe use bulk vinegar to start then drain and rinse with Ospho, drain and let dry for a few days. Finish with fuel tank coating/sealer. Eastwood or another good brand. You just pour it in your cleaned tank and roll it around to coat and seal the entire inside. You can do the whole thing for well under $50 I think.
Good advice


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Discussion Starter #35
Vick got back to me and stated I need to be using the later rubber hose filler hose.

Does anyone know if it’ll fit? It doesn’t look like it but maybe I’m mistaken.

 

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Especially with Vick, it seems the parts are about 80% and the buyer has to make up the difference. 'Cut to match, beat to fit.'

Some of that's to be expected, given our car was designed about 60 years ago, but Vick is by far the worst. Hope you saved your old tank, so if you give up on Vick you can rework the tank that fits your car.

David O'D
Laguna CA
 
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