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Hello, for a 6" wide x 14 "Alfa" rim would a 165 tire be too narrow or would a 175/75(?)-14 be a better choice? I don't want to go as wide as 185 and don't want to buy 165s without knowing if they'll fit. Thanks for the insights. Speekas
 

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I'd say, yes. I have 195/60-14 on one set of 6" Bosch Spider wheels, and 205/60-14 on another, and they're about right. The 165 will fit, but will be a bit narrow. I would go with the 175, yes. That's still on the narrow side, but should be OK.
Andrew
 

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Many tyre manufactures have a recommended fitment list for various rim widths, with upper and lower limits for tyre width for any rim size. Seek one out. Whatever they say now would apply equally to 60s and 70s cars....not least because of the benefit of 30 years experience. With insurance issues what they are, they are unlikely to recommend risky tyre widths for any rim these days... Of course, it may also be useful to seek out people's comments in relation to 'feel' differences with wide or narrow tyres on a given rim - that is, not just safety.
 

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In 1968, Alfa offered a 5 1/2 inch alloy wheel and the stock tire was 165-14.

GTA cars came with a 6 inch rim and 165-14 tires.

Vredestein makes a very good 165-14 tire and I am thinking of using it on my GTV with Cromadora 6x14 wheels.
 
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Alfa used wide rims comparing other makers, 5-6" wheel with 165 tire, BMW had 4½-5" with same 165. For better performance I think.
185/70 is perfect with 6", but some of my friends are went back to "skinny" tires because they make car more lively.
 

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The 165x14 was stock on many Alfas, including Giulia Supers. The Vredestein Classics in 165x14 were on my Super when I bought it and proved to be an excellent tire. Somewhere I have a photo of a lowered Super with 14in GTA replicas and 165x14 Vreds. They don't look at all odd, undersized, or inappropriate. I think what does it is the slightly increased offset which moves the tires out more than stock. This changes the entire side view character of the car---for the better. The trick is 14in GTA replicas with a 30mm + offset. The stock wheels with this tires size give the car a "pinched" look that goes away when a simple wheel change.

For various reasons I change to 15x6x30 GTA replicas and 185x65x15 tires. Even in hard driving, I don't notice much difference between my Kuhmos and the Vreds that were on the car.
 

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165-14 was stock on later Supers, after the 1750 came into being, not the early cars, including US cars, which were all 15".
Gasolina, can you confirm that's 165 on those 6" GTA wheels? I would expect the sidewalls to be more angled inward. But I know each tire nominally the same size can differ a fair amount in actual size.
Andrew
 

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This is the car I was talking about. The owner at the time (the car was was subsequently sold) told me that he'd used 165x14 Vredestein Sprint Classics on Alfaholics 6x14 GTA replica mags.
 

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The other variable on tire look and feel is tire pressure.
Pirelli suggested 26 front and 28 rear for most of our cars. 1750 injected got 24 front and 26 rear while 2000 injected was 25 front and 26 rear.
For sub-race speeds, these pressures provide a good compromise of ride and grip.

Also, more fun to drive !!
 

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Yes, these cars reacts clearly even very little change in tire pressure. Easiest and cheapiest way improve handling :) 26/26 works good for me with 185/70-14 allmost everywhere except low speed city cruising.
 

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I'll join in with some general comments on adding new alloy wheels, if one was thinking about it.

Many use the GTA replicas, which with the small "hubcap" looks finished. But with "Supah" decided to get the "TZ/Ti Super" ones from Classic Alfa. In the 15-inch size.

At first when looking at the black inset of the rear axle, I thought I had bought the wrong wheel. But the setup grows on you. What's more, the wheels are getting more favourable comment than I would expect.

Very pleased with the Vred Classic 175/70/15.

Was uncertain if the fit would clear when motoring fast on "B" roads. Particularly with 5-mm spacers. So on the rear left one off.

No problems--that's on press-on driving over the "humpy-bumpies" on our Spring Tour.

However, the spacers were made of steel and seemed heavy compared to aluminum. So, having a lighter set made now.

The 5 mm spacer takes the alloy wheel right out to the end of the thread.
 

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Tire choice is not simply a matter of buying replicas of 1960's and 1970's tires. Things have changed for the better. Tires are now demonstrably safer, grippier and often more durable and puncture resistant than 40 years ago.

Unless you are seeking a car that is in essence a museum piece then some consideration of the type of tire you need is very important.

This applies to tire pressure especially. As a young fella driving in the 80's tires were run at 22-36 psi. Now 30 would be considered dangerously low. Most new tires run at 38-44 psi and perhaps even higher if being used to carry loads or high speeds.

Do some research. New manufacturing techniques, silicon rubber compounds, new belting materials and altered design means that tires now will stress your suspension long before they "let go" on a corner.

Here in Oz a basic tire fitted to a family sedan will outperform the P6 sports tires that were on my GTV in the 80's.

I suppose what I'm getting at is that if you intend to "drive" your pride and joy, buying tires is not just about retro cool. It is also about safety, the impact on the suspension beneath the car, the potential to upgrade brakes and the possibility that the tire may utterly change the feel, cornering and stresses on the car.

It is also worth remembering that OEM tire choice was a product of cost, duty cycle and availability. What was specified may not have been the optimum for anyone: let alone one of us thrashing our little old italian cars 40 years down the track. This also applies to your brand new Toyota.

New tire tech is both an opportunity and a potential hazard.
 

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Tire choice is not simply a matter of buying replicas of 1960's and 1970's tires. Things have changed for the better. Tires are now demonstrably safer, grippier and often more durable and puncture resistant than 40 years ago.

Unless you are seeking a car that is in essence a museum piece then some consideration of the type of tire you need is very important.
True enough, but modern tires (Vredestein Sprint Classics come to mind) may be built to conform to vintage sizes but are a vastly better tire than what we drove on back in the day. My Super came equipped with 165x14 Vreds which were H rated and were superb ties in all respects. Likewise, the Avon CRZ66 rally tire I'm told is an excellent H rated tire in 185x70x14 and other sizes. My Super's currently driving on some H rated 185x65x15 Kuhmos which, although amazingly cheap (I think I paid $55US ea.) compared to Vreds or Avons, turned out to be quite good tires.

It also worth considering that modern high performance tires, in addition to coming in relatively smaller aspect ratios, are also intended for very different suspensions than our old vintage Alfas have. Most Alfa suspension modifications use uprated springs, shocks, and sway-bars which tend stiffen the overall ride. It's acceptable with taller aspect ratio tires (I chose 65 aspect ratio tires for a reason) but become harsh with most low aspect ratio modern performance tires. (I also think those tires look dumb on old Alfas, but that's just me).

Finally, modern tires in vintage sizes aren't really "replicas" of vintage tires. They may look vintage but modern Centuratos or Michelen XAS's may look vintage but are constructed according to modern designs and manufacturing techniques.
 

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"This applies to tire pressure especially. As a young fella driving in the 80's tires were run at 22-36 psi. Now 30 would be considered dangerously low. Most new tires run at 38-44 psi and perhaps even higher if being used to carry loads or high speeds."

Piffle !

High tire pressures on street tires are the result of a quest for low rolling resistance and better gas mileage. Ride quality and feel suffer from this, especially on our cars with suspension designed for a softer tire.

Even some new cars are running moderate pressures for a good combination of handling, smoothness and economy.
My 2013 VW Passat is factory recomended at 30 PSI and it is not "dangerously low".......
 

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I was genuinely surprised by the fact that your Passat is recommended at 30psi. So I looked up this webpage Volkswagen Tyre Pressures, Recommended Tyre Pressure Setting | Pure Tyre 01603 462959
Indeed it would seem the light cars are in the 27-33psi range while the heavier cars go up to 58. My point stands though. There are none below 27 and these cars are very light weight commuter runabouts.
I would note though that only 1 passat has a pressure of 30. The rest range between 33 and 42 with engine size an obvious indicator.

Perhaps my view has been skewed by the big family cars I have been driving for the past 15 years. Either way it seems I am preaching to an audience of educated converts!
 

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One more comment: Manufacturers make many compromises. Sometimes they even lie or build dangerous cars. Just because they suggest a particular tire pressure does not mean that is the best for you and way you drive and use your car.
 

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More piffle......

VW would be sued out of existance if it did as you suggest.

If anything, you are recomending a pressure out of the recomended range which could cause an accident. If you were a buisness, would you overinflate customers tires because you know better than the manufacturer ?
 
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