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I think it's worthwhile to add the pictures here before they expire and are lost on eBay. The first picture is from auction #230193979101 "CARRERA PANAMERICANA 1950 Alfa Romeo Bonetto PHOTO", the second picture is from auction #230193979089 "CARRERA PANAMERICANA 1951 Alfa Romeo Panini PHOTO".
 

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Discussion Starter #4
The #90 car is Taruffi's Freccia d'Oro #916602


Ronny:

You are mistaken this time re: the 1950 Carrera Panamericana cars.

#90 is Bonetto/Bonini
#103 is Taruffi/Ceroli


The 1951 car with the big number 19 on the side is the car that went off a cliff with Panini and his daughter, who was driving at the time. If I remember correctly, both were killed.
 

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Discussion Starter #5 (Edited)
I think it's worthwhile to add the pictures here before they expire and are lost on eBay. The first picture is from auction #230193979101 "CARRERA PANAMERICANA 1950 Alfa Romeo Bonetto PHOTO", the second picture is from auction #230193979089 "CARRERA PANAMERICANA 1951 Alfa Romeo Panini PHOTO".

I believe that the person selling all the Carrera photos is the same person I met something like 6 years ago, when he sold Dave Scully a bunch of photos of American cars in the Carrera Panamericana. Dave has been working on a book on American cars and drivers in the Carrera for over 10 years. The person who had the photos also did a book, now very rare, in Spanish, on the Carrera. The book is mostly newspaper reports in Mexico from the period, and the reproduction quality is rather poor.
 

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You are mistaken this time re: the 1950 Carrera Panamericana cars.

#90 is Bonetto/Bonini
#103 is Taruffi/Ceroli
This might be important information for Luc Colemont, the author of the "Freccia d'Oro" book and maintainer of the Freccia registry.

He lists the #90 car as Taruffi's Freccia d'Oro #916602, and #103 as #916600 driven by Bonetto/Bonini. He states both cars were sold after the race to Bruno Pagliai in Mexico.

Who's got it right?
 

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The 1951 car with the big number 19 on the side is the car that went off a cliff with Panini and his daughter, who was driving at the time. If I remember correctly, both were killed.
The daughter survived :

Carlos Panini, a pioneer of Mexican aviation, died when his car crashed during the second stage from Oaxaca to Puebla, of the second Carrera Panamericana. Although the registered driver for the race was Carlos' daughter Teresa (Teresita) it seems that he was at the wheel of car, despite he did not have a valid license and he was in ill health. The accident happened while the young Bobby Unser was trying to overtake Panini who was travelling at a lower speed and blocked the American for a long stretch, after several attempts Unser forced the maneuver but the two cars touched. Unser was skilled enough to control his Jaguar, while Panini's Alfa Romeo went straight into a wall. Ricardo Ramirez of Mexico City abandoned the race to rush the Paninis to a hospital in Puebla, but the father was dead on arrival. Teresa Panini survived the accident with minor injuries.

Carlos Panini was of Italian origin, most probably from the province of Como in Lombardia region. He is credited with being the first pilot to fly a light plane around the world. In 1927 he had established Mexico's first scheduled airline, which he had recently sold with plans for retirement. Newspapers gave his age as 54, but one states his age as 48.

Although several sources, including website Automovilismo Deportivo, indicate his surname as Pannini, a message posted by his grandson Bruno in the genealogy website Appellidos Italianos clearly shows that the correct spelling is Panini.

Carlos Panini was the third of three drivers killed in the 1951 running of the Carrera Panamericana: José Estrada Menocal and co-driver Miguel González died the day before, on 20 November 1951.

Source: motorsportmemorial.com: The Leading Memorials Site on the Net
 

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Discussion Starter #12 (Edited)

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103 Bonetto

....and this shows Bonetto with his "103" Freccia. He won the longest and most difficult "etapa" of the 1950 Carrera-Panamericana.
The "clasificacion" shows Felice Bonetto as the 103 and Piero Taruffi as the 90 driver...

Ciao,

Luc

www.frecciadoro.com
 

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1950 & 1951 Carrera

I have not double-checked for the purposes of this response, but the implication of what is in my computer based on data collection and cross-referencing to date indicates:

1950 #90 ACI entry for Taruffi & Isidoro Ceroli in 916602, finishing 4th o/a
1950 #103 ACI entry for Bonetto & Bruno Bonini in 916600, finishing 8th o/a
Both cars remained in Mexico after the race.

1951 #19 Carlo Panini & Teresa Panini in 915805, a 1949 car purchased 1951 by Carlo Panini. Carlo became "Carlos" in Mexican reports. Crash was on the second stage/2nd day. This car also remained in Mexico after the fatal accident.
 

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Anyone know what chassis number the 1949 2500 SS Touring Panini car was?? I would think it was scrapped after the 1951 Pan Americana crash.The car did have 153150 Roma plates at the race.

Unrelated photos I took last week of two 2500's near this area that are under restoration.

Thanks for your help iicarjohn.

Tom Tanner/Ferrari Expo 2014-Chicago March 2014-Pan Am display
 

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We have the original/second body of 815001 which looks exactly the same body as the one posted by F1 Tommy. Any idea where are this two bodies being restored and to which chassis they belong?
 

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It would be nice ...

... to learn the chassis and body numbers (and more) for the two cars shown to us (under restoration near Chicago?) by F1 Tommy. Both bodies are distinctive. The body with more "swoop" in the fender lines does indeed resemble the second body that was fitted circa 1941/1942/1943 to chassis 815001 by Pinin Farina. Being war-time in Europe, this was a convoluted period for car-building ... and the people who were their constructors!

It would be nice to learn the PF body number for the 1941/42/43 body that was made for 815001. Learning something of the one may help inform us just a bit about the other once we have some actual data to compare?

Aside from all the major mechanical elements that were numbered individually, I remind the historically interested that, during the late 1930's (and into the 1940's) it is not unusual to find tiny "spark-pencil" markings on some internal mechanical parts of the engine, gearbox and suspension. Sometimes the markings are extremely small but can be read with a magnifying glass. Those markings appear to have been made by (at least some) machinists and/or mechanics during the original build process. They can give us dates and additional details that may or may not be too esoteric to interpret meaningfully ... but we cannot know this until we collect the data and try to make sense of it. It may be that these markings were made by those who normally worked in the aero section ... or learned some of their craft in that area of Alfa Romeo?

I have shared the attached form previously but here it is again. I expect no form to be filled out completely. I don't even expect everyone to share their data straight away. But, it would be nice if each person who owns or works on one of these cars collected a bit of data and, one day, consider sharing it, even if it is only with someone else. Every time someone does, or when a number filters its way through others, I feel a bit less alone in my attempt to make sense of some of this stuff. Numbers are certainly not all-important, and some we do not yet know how to interpret correctly, but some of them give us very nice clues.

Many times, when I ask someone or another if they found a body number anywhere in a car we are discussing, the response is, "Oh Yeah! There were numbers on everything ... but I never made a note of it and I don't remember what it was."

John de Boer
The Italian Car Registry
(incorporating a long-time study of Alfa Romeo 6C2300, 6C2500 ... and more)
 

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