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Hi all, thought it about time I got around to adding another 105 restoration blog to the forum. I get an enormous amount of value from following other people's progress pics and discussions on here, so figure it's only fair to share my own project here as well.

I'm a little ways in to the project now, so have a bit of catch up to do..but starting from the start, I found the car locally at the start of COVID lockdown. Figured if I was going to be in lock down I might as well be locked in the shed...Car is a '69 GTV 1750 Series 1. It was partly stripped already, a lot of it already in boxes. Missing a few parts, but mostly complete.. Not the best way to buy a project car I know, but it was practically on my doorstep and I knew I could spend months or years searching for the perfect project car in which time COVID would probably have passed us by and we'd not be locked down anymore, and I wouldn't be wondering how to spend all the spare time I once had..!

Starting Point: - Previous owner partially stripped the car, and stripped the paint off to reveal its secrets, but then covered it back up with primer and didn't go any further... A previous owner before that attempted must have attempted some body repairs but they were very half arsed to say the least! No denying I've got a lot work ahead of me, and won't be finished before this pandemic is finished, but nevertheless I am stoked to own a 105 and am loving it.

It has rust in the all the usual places - sills, floor pans, boot floor and spare wheel well etc. It even has some rust in unusual places too...such as the convexed curvature of its roof..! How does moisture hang around long enough on a open curved surface like a roof to do that?!!?

Anyway, here are a few general pics from t = zero..
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Thanks for watching!

Cheers,
Mark
 

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Stripping it down...

I think it was easter weekend was the first weekend that i had it in my shed...and I think I spent the best part of two days looking at it wondering where to start. Don't have a very big shed, so I was hesitant to start spreading parts all over the shed, but pretty quickly realised I had no choice but to strip it and start again...fortunately half of it was already done and packed in boxes in the trunk, so they just got moved to some shelves and then I started at the front :)

Started spinning spanners and removing the engine..then running gear..

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Building a rotisserie...

Didn't take a lot of thinking to come to the conclusion that a rotisserie was going to be essential. Not just for being able to spin in and get access, but also to make it mobile once it was stripped down to a shell.
I looked at various rotisserie designs online and other restorers and found there are lots of options. In the end my design was mostly driven by what second hand steel I could find cheap on Gumtree! Thats about the only thing I like about living in suburbia, and that is the higher density of people means you can almost always find what you need on Gumtree nearby!

I'm amazed that some are able to use bumper mounts as the main supports. One of my rear bumper mounts literally fell off when I removed the fuel tank, so that was never going to be an option for me. I opted to pick up the same places the wheels and suspension does and keep it all tied together with longitudinal beam underneath.

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A bit of bling for the rotisserie...

I wasn't 100% comfortable with the amount of deflection I had in the longitudinal beam that it sat on, so I made a duplicate top beam as well to help tie it all together. The actual deflection over nearly 5m in lengh with the single beam was probably fine, but since it might be on there for a fair while, and since I had more Gumtree steel still so I did it anyway. It reduced the visible deflection to zero, and made me feel a lot better about it. Can't see it in these photos but there is also a vertical brace I added to join the two longitudinal beams together that goes through the gear shift cutout..

The first time I put the car on the rotisserie was actually pretty dodgy since I had to lift the car up to the height of the towers using jacks and blocks before I could drop a pin in. So I was pretty keen to add some sort of jacking mechanism bling to not have to do this every time. The obvious solution initially was some ebay long stroke hydraulic cylinder(s) but that didn't really suit the design of my end support towers without modifying them quite a bit.. so I experimented with some threaded rod. Ideally would have used trapezoidal screws (acme thread) but they are **** expensive! And I figured for the weight of a little Alfa 105 divided by 2 this would work fine. And it did. Cordless rattle gun on the top nut and can wind it up and down in a matter of minutes now:)

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Nice work on the rotisserie

Pete
 
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Nice work on the rotisserie

Pete
Thanks Pete. Pretty happy with it. Best part is I haven't bent over, or crawled around on the floor once since I built it!
 

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Sticky stuff...

After a few enquiries to media blasters for quotes I tried to convince myself that I could avoid blasting initially and just clean up localised areas as I went...but after many hours scraping/scratching sound deadener and underbody sealant without it looking much different I quickly reverted back to accepting it was a necessary expense. Nevertheless I still removed a lot of the black stuff myself, partly to keep the sandblaster happy, but mostly out of curiosity to see what was underneath.

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3 out of 4 floorpans had large patch repairs done quite poorly and covered up with black underbody coating. RHS rear section was actually pretty good, and particularly anywhere under the thick sound deadening material, the metal is as good as new!

As I mentioned above, after hours of scraping and scratching away the black underbody coating it didn't look much different to before I started!

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Discussion Starter #8 (Edited)
Investigative surgery...

Time to start investigating properly...with angle grinder!

Outer sill removal revealed some terrible previous repairs to the A-pillars and LHS B-pillar. I would have preferred to have just seen rust, than to find this, but oh well. Inner and middle sills are pretty solid though at least. Will require some small sections to repair inner and middles but glad to know they'll be able to stay in the car atleast and keep things tied together..

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Far from the worse PO repairs I've seen. Getting serious now ...

Pete
 

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Flinstone mobile...

With it now booked in to go to the sandblasters I was keen to cut away as much of what I knew was going to be getting cut out anyway..so started with floors. Although I decided to keep the rear sections in place for now to keep a bit of rigidity.

Cutting the bulk of them out was pretty quick and easy, but unpicking the spotwelds without damaging the surface you want to keep is quite tedious! And even more tedious when they aren't factory spot welds cos they harder to find!
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Dropped the spare wheel well out too. Initially thought I'd get a whole repro boot floor, and chop the whole thing out now, but decided to wait till it's blasted to make a call on that.
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Starting to make a pile:) Interestingly I've noticed the rotisserie CoG has shifted since I started chopping bits out of the bottom, and I needed to bring it down to the next hole to spin easily again:)
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as 105's go it looks good, you should be pleased, look forward to seeing more, cheers ian
 

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Asbestos is only dangerous when breathable. When trapped in another product it should be fine, which is why they (just) wet buildings when removing it.

BTW: be very careful regarding sandblasting. Can stretch panels. I recommend bead blasting or something softer, but the operator is the most important issue!
Pete
 

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Discussion Starter #14 (Edited)
To be honest I did not know that that thick deadening material had asbestos in it. Thanks for pointing that out...feeling a bit niave now..especially now that I've searched that specifically and found numerous posts about it! I was aware of the exhaust heat shield plates underneath containing asbestos (which I took necessary precautions with), but not the black tar stuff. Fortunately the method I used to remove it was softening it to almost a goo with a heat gun and scraping/peeling it up, so that gives me some comfort knowing it wouldn't have become very airborne...
 

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Alfa Romeo in their body repair/paint notes list where to put the body seam sealer and that the tar has asbestos in it
 

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Discussion Starter #16
Back to bare metal...

After discussing with the sand blaster that he was going to collect the car on rotisserie with his car trailer I needed to make some extra outrigger wheels to shorten the wheel base a bit, which was fine....and then he sent a tilt tray anyway!

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Anyway, it's been blasted back to bare metal now, and sealed with an epoxy primer and as of this afternoon is now back in my shed...which means I am up to date with this blog of my project....and now the real fun begins. But first we have to hook up the boat and go to Shark Bay fishing for two weeks:)
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I admire your bravery at cutting so much away so quickly. I'm too scared to loose the reference on how it supposed to go

Pete
 

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Discussion Starter #18
I haven't really cut any decent reference points away. The front wings and clip etc weren't really attached properly anymore anyway so it was no loss to remove them at this stage I didn't think. The front is going to be a nightmare to put back together though, I know. Not really looking forward to that bit!
 
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