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I have two 58 spider veloces, short wheelbase, both with factory hardtops. One is in spectacular condition, the other, rust free, original paint and purchased by the original owner's son. Both have the original engines and components such as DCO3's, marelli generators etc. Does anyone have a clue as to how many approximate survivors are left, and how many were originally produced in this configuration? Surprisingly the values still haven't caught on especially compared to the Porsche 356's.
 

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Chris Boles has taken a lot of pride in keeping a register. It probably needs updates and would have some more value if the state of the cars was included but I'm not volunteerin'... Porsches will always have a certain unexplainable panache and as long as they are so revered they will bring big money. The best chance for Alfas to enter into that league was when Ferrari owners in the 80's during the big bubble in values in those cars made a move but that seemed to fizzle.

http://www.veloceregister.net/750f.htm
 

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I've spent decades in researching financial markets and returned to 101 Alfas five years ago.

The difference in price levels between 101 Alfas and the equivalent Porsche or Healey 3000 is in the order of $35,000 compared to $60,000, or higher. This is big and worth reviewing. I'll give it try and hope that others join in.

I had a Healey 100 and an MGTF before buying a 1300 Spider. Porsche had such esteem that when I moved to Toronto in 1965 I had a budget of $1400 to buy a 356 coupe. After driving the 356 and the Spider I bought the latter.

Alfa's design, handling, braking and comfort are superior to those of the other two cars.

In the late 1950s and 1960s the focus of performance in North America was the zero to 60 measure, with the big number being 10 seconds. The Healey 3000 could do that. A Veloce did it at 12 and the "normale" at 14. These are approximations as the numbers varied from one car magazine to another.

As the saying went, 356s were "pigs", but on the track they were "fast pigs".
With the first mid-engined race cars ( 550s) and on long races they became known as "giant killers"--an appealing accolade that rubbed off on the rear-engined cars.

It is uncertain how long the hot market for most collectible cars will last, but markets can't stand a vacuum and the difference in relative prices should narrow.

The recent Goodings auction of a very fine Sprint Speciale at $155,000 could be a weather vane.

For some time now, I've thought that of 750/101 Sprints as an affordable Ferrari Tour de France--similar looks with better handling and braking.

The Spiders are the equivalent to the Ferrari California Spider.
 

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[QUOTE.....For some time now, I've thought that of 750/101 Sprints as an affordable Ferrari Tour de France--similar looks with better handling and braking.

The Spiders are the equivalent to the Ferrari California Spider.[/QUOTE]

which translates to what? Sorry I lost the connection and so did every other person who owns a TdF or FCS or any v12 Ferrari...better round up some buyers with this thinking and kick start the market for our little cars
 

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[QUOTE.....For some time now, I've thought that of 750/101 Sprints as an affordable Ferrari Tour de France--similar looks with better handling and braking.

The Spiders are the equivalent to the Ferrari California Spider.
which translates to what?[/QUOTE]

I'll promise to write a little slower.

:p
 
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