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The former owner ( Bill Conway - I think he sold it, anyway) was a member of the DVAROC and has a history of having original low mileage cars. For example, he also owns a S4 spider with 1300 (not 13,000) original miles! He also has a perfect bronze alfetta. He meticulously maintains his cars, typically using Algar Ferrari as his shop and is really focused on originality. I would not think that this is anything less than as advertised.
 

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If you read through the old issues of the local Alfa Club, this car has been for sale for a very long time by Conway with an original asking price of $15,000. It seems like one of those cases where the guy doesn't want to sell the car, but puts a high price out there in case someone bites.

In any case, I paid $10,000 for my mint GTV6 with fewer miles than this one, so I could see someone paying close to the asking price for this Alfetta if it is as advertised.
 

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Its worth the money, if miles are true. You don't come across Alfa's like this very often.
 

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If anyone is interested in a firsthand account of this car, please contact me. I looked at this car very seriously 2 months ago.
 

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I can vouch for this car and Bill Conway as well. The car is as good as he says, and Bill is meticulous perhaps to the point of needing treatment.
 

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IMHO, no Alfetta is worth that much. It's the "924" of Alfas, and I love the 924, as well as the Alfetta GT. FWIW, the "market" seems to agree with me.
 

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IMHO, no Alfetta is worth that much. It's the "924" of Alfas, and I love the 924, as well as the Alfetta GT. FWIW, the "market" seems to agree with me.
I agree with your comments about the current market values of Alfettas. However, I have to admit that I think an Alfetta is more Alfa than a 924 is Porsche. The Alfetta still had an Alfa engine (and a great one at that), along with characteristically Alfa-ish innovations. I like 924s, but they just weren't real Porsches... they broke entirely with tradition in terms of engine placement and aesthetics, using VW and Audi components where true Porsche parts were needed. The Alfetta, conversely, was very much an Alfa: typically great sounds, typically strange-but-pretty looks, typically awful ergonomics, typically delightful (and delightfully atypical) driving experience... plus typical rust and weak synchros to scare away the whimps.

I've seen Bill Conway's Alfetta at New Hope, and, yes, it's perfect. I think it's worth his asking price simply because it's likely impossible to find another Alfetta that good for sale anywhere.
 

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Discussion Starter #10

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I agree with your comments about the current market values of Alfettas. However, I have to admit that I think an Alfetta is more Alfa than a 924 is Porsche. The Alfetta still had an Alfa engine (and a great one at that), along with characteristically Alfa-ish innovations. I like 924s, but they just weren't real Porsches... they broke entirely with tradition in terms of engine placement and aesthetics, using VW and Audi components where true Porsche parts were needed. The Alfetta, conversely, was very much an Alfa: typically great sounds, typically strange-but-pretty looks, typically awful ergonomics, typically delightful (and delightfully atypical) driving experience... plus typical rust and weak synchros to scare away the whimps.

I've seen Bill Conway's Alfetta at New Hope, and, yes, it's perfect. I think it's worth his asking price simply because it's likely impossible to find another Alfetta that good for sale anywhere.

All very good points, and I agree the Alfa is better than a 924 in many ways. I don't know what a 924 in similar state would go for, but then it's not as rare a piece, either.

All that aside, worth is in the eye of the beholder, and I hope this Alfetta ends up in a good home.
 

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Well then count me in as naive. That Plymouth Arrow is cool. Although not an Alfa and not a Giorgetto Giugiaro design, to me, it looks like it was influenced by him.
 

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From one out here in Aus there are 3 fundamental problems with this car, and that is forgetting it is LHD or the price being asked, but it sits far too high, it has those awful rubber bumpers, rather than the original slim line stainless steel ones as we got out here and as per in Europe/UK and lastly, in '76 it was in fact a GT 1.8 not a GTV 2L. Strange how the US got different specs to the rest of the world.

The GT was always a rarer version to the GTV, given the relatively short production run they had.

I agree the price is elevated but perhaps if the condition is brilliant and it is a genuine low mileage car that adds value to it. Mind you there is a guy out here who has been trying to sell a GTV6 for $36K for the past two years and still hasn't sold it. So all the best to the seller but in the end the market will dictate its ultimate value.
 

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Well then count me in as naive. That Plymouth Arrow is cool. Although not an Alfa and not a Giorgetto Giugiaro design, to me, it looks like it was influenced by him.
I guess that's my point...I like the Arrow, too, but the Alfetta came first and remained a highly influential design for the better part of a decade. To say that the Alfetta looks like a Plymouth Arrow is backwards and, well, naive. It almost sounded as if the poster was seeing an Alfetta for the first time.
 

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From one out here in Aus there are 3 fundamental problems with this car, and that is forgetting it is LHD or the price being asked, but it sits far too high, it has those awful rubber bumpers, rather than the original slim line stainless steel ones as we got out here and as per in Europe/UK and lastly, in '76 it was in fact a GT 1.8 not a GTV 2L. Strange how the US got different specs to the rest of the world.
Yes, we got the uglified version of everything European. All of our Alfettas came with 2 litres and SPICA fuel injection (and different manifolds, etc. etc.)
I'd also argue that we never received cars with the GTV outlet vents, but then a bunch of others would swear that we did. It's next to impossible to argue trim bits on Alfettas, as it seems the factory picked up whatever was laying about that day and attached it to the car.
 

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Yes, we got the uglified version of everything European. All of our Alfettas came with 2 litres and SPICA fuel injection (and different manifolds, etc. etc.)
I'd also argue that we never received cars with the GTV outlet vents, but then a bunch of others would swear that we did. It's next to impossible to argue trim bits on Alfettas, as it seems the factory picked up whatever was laying about that day and attached it to the car.

The GTV vents were definitely put on the US spec cars - we have two cars in the family that have them. My sister also dated a guy back in late 70s whose Alfetta had them as well...and yes, it was a requirement that anyone dating one of my sisters had to drive an Alfa...thanks for asking.

Ready to sell me your Fulvia yet?
 

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I think that in general the slatted outlet vents came on the 75 and 76 cars, with the GTV vents from 77 on. But this being Alfa anything is possible. Usually, the best way to date a fetta is to see if it has a gas cap door or not. The 75/76 cars did, the later ones did not. Same with the bonded windshields and hatch glass and the tupperware door panels.

There is a press photo of a euro 1.8 GT that has shown up in tons of books that is identical to my US model 2 liter GT (other than the bumpers), so once again nothing is certain with these cars.:confused:
 
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