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Most people do a swap and just never get it certified. Not really a problem, but the smog tech always pulls up the 2.5 static ignition timing. The dyno part of the smog is always the least of your worries.
Please elaborate about the tech's use of static timing. I assume they check emissions at idle RPM and also at higher RPM, but what checks are done based on the timing? Thx
 

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Got a 2.5 w/ SCAM's and I love it. Had to upgrade cause of the transmission upgrade(another story) .5 Liters does not to me make that much of a difference, but others will protest because of all the money they put into their upgrade to a 3.0. I have a GTV-6 with a Milano Verde setup and I'd rather have me 2.5 any day, she's been in hibernation for 10 years. It's just a preference. Sounds better and I love it's power, torque, and BEST sounding V6 ever made(Octo*****). Sorry Don't yell at me, but a 3 liter just doesn't do it for me! They just don't sound or feel the same. Like the 1750 vs. the 2000?
She's getting serviced this winter and I hope to drive her next summer?
Sorry Administrators!
 

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Please elaborate about the tech's use of static timing. I assume they check emissions at idle RPM and also at higher RPM, but what checks are done based on the timing? Thx
They check static timing based on book value for a 2.5L or 3.0L with a timing light. The emissions check is at load on different speeds on the dyno in most densely populated areas of CA (15 and 25 mph).

The best mod for performance is to move out of California!
 

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Makes sense, even though I'm not nearly as mechanically inclined as most of you folks here. Here in SoCal, most people that want something extra just do the swap, and frankly they don't seem to muck about with those other routes...presumably because of emissions.
If you're not mechanically inclined and are just writing a check for this, I would keep your current motor and make sure the valves are properly adjusted until it dies.

Then if it needs a rebuild find a Verde engine and swap it if you want. Others in CA have done it, and if you're paying for labor you don't want to pay for all the parts swapping a 164 engine requires.

I'm a cheap bastard and like getting my hands dirty, so now that I have a GTV6 I plan to find a 164 block and build a nice 3.0 for the future. My GTV6 has 179k miles on it but still runs great, the PO changed the oil religiously and it shows. But at some point I know I will succumb to temptation and upgrade it. For now I'm just trying to enjoy it, it's such a nice original car.

I agree with the folks that say don't just do cams. You really won't feel it, and all the extra power will be near redline where you never drive. I had a Milano Verde and it had gobs of torque. I thought it sounded amazing as well, and a free flowing exhaust definitely increased the performance measurably. And made amazing noises.
 

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One thing I forgot to mention in my last post was that I did that conversion on ‘96 while living 1/2 a mile from Joe Beninca, in Melbourne Australia. After it was done Joe ran it up on his dyno for me, he said it started to run a bit lean at around 6000rpm but otherwise was fine with the 2.5 injectors and ECU. I spent far too many hours poking around that shop, learnt heaps.
 

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I owned a good stock 84 GTV6 many years ago and enjoyed it for a few years but the love didn't last. Much later I came across a for sale '84 which had undergone a Milano 3.0 swap done by an Alfa mechanic in Portland, Oregon and I couldn't resist it. It's likely that the stock version of this model might be worth more on the used car market someday but to my mind the extra horses bring a significant increase in driving pleasure and not a small amount of excitement and these are the reasons I drive this brand
 

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I was joking about the smog tech looking for the 3.0 stamp.

You will run into the fact that when the smog tech in CA pulls up the static timing, they will use the 2.5 numbers.
Yeah, my shop is licensed as a "repair" facility in CA as we specialize in Porsches and BMWs of all ages, but we don't do actual smog tests (too much hassle). The functional/visual smog test applied to older, odd foreign cars such as the GTV6 is largely at the discretion of the individual smog tech. We see this and hear about it all the time with customer cars. The last time I smogged my '81 GTV6, the smog tech got out the book and started looking at ignition timing info and I then explained the Italian abbreviations of the crankshaft pulley markings, but he gave up and instead chose to just check tailpipe emissions, which are freakishly clean on my junkyard special :). Others might not be so lucky . . . . .
 

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They check static timing based on book value for a 2.5L or 3.0L with a timing light. The emissions check is at load on different speeds on the dyno in most densely populated areas of CA (15 and 25 mph).

The best mod for performance is to move out of California!
To be sure we are not confusing terms, "static" timing is checking the ignition timing of an old-fashioned engine with a points-type distributor while it is not running. The engine is turned over by hand and a test light is used to determine when the ignition points first open.

No CA smog tech is doing this. They check timing with the engine running at idle by using a timing light. The emissions label under the hood of any car of the era calls out the ignition timing at idle.
 
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