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Still waiting for my timing belts (eta Friday the 8th) and the cam dyes I was going to order will not fit my engine code so let's move on...

Both of the S belt bearings felt a bit stiff and right-most idler bearing for the T belt felt downright awful, with binding throughout its rotation.
I have ordered 2 skf bearings for the S belt idler but thought I would look into repacking the T belt idler bearing as I could not identify a replacement.

DO THIS AT YOUR OWN RISK!!!

Pictures are attached:

The T idler bearing has 2 blue dirt shields, one on either side. These can be pried off easily but do not be to forceful as they may get bent out of shape. Under the blue shields are black ones. These are a bit harder to remove. To do so, you have to insert a small screwdriver or other item, not too pointy or sharp, into the space between the inner or outer face of the seal, push down gently at an angle until you feel resistance, push a bit harder and the opposite shield should start to come out of its place. Once it is partly out, slide another small screwdriver under the lip and move around until the entire piece comes out. Careful not to brake it and do not discard as this part serves as the "cage" to keep the individual balls in place. Without this cage, the balls will bunch up.

What I found is that the grease had hardened to a tar-like substance. This stuff was between the balls (rolling elements) and especially bunched up on the cages. Once I cleaned it all off and repacked the space with good quality Lucas hi-temp, all resistance was gone and the bearing rolled freely and smoothly. The grease ads a bit of resistance to the rolling elements and the bearing will spin more freely without any grease BUT that will burn them out so get the new grease in there. Once repacked, space the elements and snap the CLEAN cages back on, one side at a time. Then, after spinning a few times to ensure everything runs smoothly, re-insert the blue dirt shields.

The S belt tension rollers are built differently. These have one set of shields and they are very stiff so prying out without cracking them is difficult. Use the same method of removal (small screw driver inserted from one side to push out the opposite side).
The shields do not serve as the element cage.

The rolling elements for this bearing are held in place by an internal cage. You have to be VERY careful when inserting your screw driver that you do not bend or damage the internal cage as this can damage the bearing. I found that these also had lots of hardened grease inside. Once cleaned up and repacked, they also moved properly with no resistance OR SLACK. If you have any slack, no good as they will wear and possibly seize.
I finished up one of these this morning but as I had ordered to replacement units (no refunds, sorry) I may just have the new ones pressed in.
 

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Discussion Starter #2
Pictures for the above

Sorry... did not take last attempt so re-attaching pictures of bearing innards.

Proceed at your own risk and when in doubt, replace rather than rebuild.

Pictures are:
XXX422 T belt tension bearing showing the rolling elements.
xxx424 T belt tension from another angle
xxx426 T belt blue outer dirt shields
xxx425 T belt cages (note hardened grease)
xxx426 S belt bearing showing the hardened grease under the seal.
 

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Addendum... When working with the T bearing, the black cage moves around slightly and you can push it left or right just enough to see the balls underneath. Aim for a space in between so you do not scratch the ball (rolling element) and at a slight angle so as to push under the center of the opposite cage. Just to ensure you do not damage the cage, although they are pretty tough.

With the S pulley-bearing, it's more of a hit and miss so if you insert a small screwdriver (considering blunting the end if it is sharp) push in gently and if you feel resistance about 1/8 in from the edge of the black shield, you may be hitting the cage so move the tip to another angle, less shallow so it is inserted between the cage and outer face and try to push down a little further. You just want to push out the opposite side enough to get another tip underneath and pry it off.
 

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I might be doing this soon. I have taken apart a few of these in the past to test krytox grease. I am just not 100% on the seals being good enough after being pulled. Especially if older. I use plastic and metal seal picks (dental grade for the metal). Usually I can get the seals out ok but once they did bend a little, I had to flatten them. I just get worried when this happens as this is when grease may be lost. Let us know how they last. I am sure these will be NLA soon! Maybe a few years down the road.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
I did try my dental picks but was worried about chipping the edges of the S bearing seal as they are hard, not really pliable. The S bearings are going to replaced with new ones as I ordered 2 prior to getting these open (I expected to find damaged balls or something but only found old grease) and as I have spent $70, better to go the extra $40 and have the new ones pressed in. The biggest trip up with these ones is damaging the metal cage inside. Some of the grease may come out over time. The Lucas grease I am using has a 600 degree rating so should last awhile. Since it's the S belt, won't be as hard to keep an eye on it.

The tension bearing outer seal is a bit more pliable but you have to be careful to not damage the inner gates as they hold EACH ball in place.
I am not going to touch the others as they all seem to move smoothly, albeit a bit tighter than the cleaned up ones. Could also be the weight of the grease used at the factory but wow, the grease in the T bearing was like tar.
 

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Steve. I did look at these and also at another on ebay with the exact same description. When I received an email confirming postage costs from the ebay seller, he stated that they were NOT for my engine code.

The description was exactly the same as the Tottalyalfa ones:

"This set of camblocks suits Alfa Romeo V6 2.5 & 3.0 litre Quad Cam 24v Engines (97-04).

To fit engines with the following engine model codes -

2.5 - 324.01, 324.04, 342.01, 343.01, 324.05
3.0 - 161.02, 161.05, 343.01, 64307 (164 Q4)"

Would rather wait an extra day and be sure opposed to spending $120 and receiving the wrong dyes as shipping is never refunded.

I have sent Totally Alfa an email with my engine year and code and have asked them to confirm fitment.

Fingers crossed as I want to get this done.
 

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Discussion Starter #8 (Edited)
B.T.W. The 63004 bearings have arrived. Not skf but Japanese made so comfortable with that. The bearing looks slightly wider than the one in the pulley BUT it looks as if the side of the pulley housing was pressed onto the edge of the bearing, possible to prevent it spinning loose... or forcing an entire unit change. In any case, the guy I ordered them from is now reluctant to remove the old ones... bugger.. as I might not have ordered otherwise and saved myself $66.

Going to look at this carefully as I would rather have the new bearing in there. My wife will not be happy with tiny $33 bookends.
 

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The pressed rim (sort of a continuous staking) is for bearing retention. Don't know why the guy doesn't want to remove the old bearings, if that is his objection. Easy to do. they can be pressed out, and the new ones pressed in using Loctite, and/or re-staking that original pressed retention rim which was pushed out of the way when the bearing was pressed out.

So you are saying that the cam locking dies for the 95 are different than for the 94?
 

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Discussion Starter #10
Re cam dyes, 94 vs 95

The pressed rim (sort of a continuous staking) is for bearing retention. Don't know why the guy doesn't want to remove the old bearings, if that is his objection. Easy to do. they can be pressed out, and the new ones pressed in using Loctite, and/or re-staking that original pressed retention rim which was pushed out of the way when the bearing was pressed out.

So you are saying that the cam locking dies for the 95 are different than for the 94?
I just don't know for sure as the engine codes noted in the ebay ad and also the Totally Alfa ad are showing the exact same engine series but the ebay seller says it will NOT fit my 95. Hope to have this figured out soon as I want to get things together.
 

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OEM tools fit both 94 and 95. There is NO cam difference between 94 and 95 cars that I am aware of. I think the seller is confused

if you replace the bearing make sure you turn the pulley over and align it to belt center. Don't trust Loctite to hold a bearing in, there needs to be mechanical means to prevent the bearing from falling out
 

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if you replace the bearing make sure you turn the pulley over and align it to belt center. Don't trust Loctite to hold a bearing in, there needs to be mechanical means to prevent the bearing from falling out
Good point. Staking will work but turning the pulley around is safer. That's what I've done when I installed a new bearing.
 

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I just don't know for sure as the engine codes noted in the ebay ad and also the Totally Alfa ad are showing the exact same engine series but the ebay seller says it will NOT fit my 95. Hope to have this figured out soon as I want to get things together.
94 and 95 24v 3.0L engines use the same timing dies.
 

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The Fiat parts eper makes no distinction between the two years.
 

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I am sure these will be NLA soon! Maybe a few years down the road.
Jason, how about a different, but commonly available bearing, with a similar outer diameter but with a larger standard inner diameter that a bushing could easily be made to take up the space?
 

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I would have no problem with running a larger OD bearing even if it has a larger ID.
The bigger the better for loads. The Dayco 89042 12V serp idler pulley is certainly that way. Same with the fiat double row bearing pulley.
 

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Totally Alfa cam dies worked fine on my 95LS.

To be clear, however, I ordered special dies for the intake cams which were upgraded to GTA spec.

He was able to supply cam dies for those cams as well.
 

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John,

I have not done any looking as of yet. If I can krytox these then we have a good option for awhile. But that bearing will be slightly intensive in the cleaning department. I am not a huge fan of cleaning OLD grease out. Prefer them new, cleaning is easier but it can be done if bearings are still good.

I will have a look and see what I can find. For now we have good stock on these bearings so no worries yet.
 
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