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Bought a two year old 2017 Giulia TI Sport AWD with 19K miles from an out of state dealer and I can't get it to pass smog testing in California. It is certified in 50 States. The OBD says that all but one system is ready to be tested. The EGR is not ready to be tested. The local dealer has determined the EGR system is working, they can't get the CPU to wake up and report that all systems are ready. That was 10 weeks ago. I'm told that an engineer from Alfa Romeo is flying out to CA to write code and download it to my car. I've been waiting a 8 weeks now.

I'm ready to call an attorney. Stopping here on the forum for some advice before doing so.

Ideas? I can't be alone in this. Motor Trend's Car of the Year didn't say anything about excluding CA.
 

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Bought a two year old 2017 Giulia TI Sport AWD with 19K miles from an out of state dealer and I can't get it to pass smog testing in California. It is certified in 50 States. The OBD says that all but one system is ready to be tested. The EGR is not ready to be tested. The local dealer has determined the EGR system is working, they can't get the CPU to wake up and report that all systems are ready. That was 10 weeks ago. I'm told that an engineer from Alfa Romeo is flying out to CA to write code and download it to my car. I've been waiting a 8 weeks now.

I'm ready to call an attorney. Stopping here on the forum for some advice before doing so.

Ideas? I can't be alone in this. Motor Trend's Car of the Year didn't say anything about excluding CA.
Before a vehicle can be Emission Tested, the Readiness Monitors must be set. This is done by driving the vehicle.

The Readiness Monitors are erased, or un-set, by disconnecting the battery, clearing-erasing (Check Engine Light, CEL) codes, or erasing and reinstalling the PCM program. I believe that there are 11 Readiness Monitors. They are reset when the OnBoard Diagnostic (OBD) system runs it's normal internal tests. Some of the tests are only run during certain driving conditions.

Driving the car through the prescribed-published Drive Cycles can be tricky and difficult. Some vehicles reset more easily than others. Some may require the Drive Cycle be performed more than once. Some are sensitive to fuel level and may need fuel to be at a lower level at the start of the Drive Cycle and then require fuel to be added before the final Readiness Monitors will set. Some vehicles may require that the AC be on, some off. Here is an explanation of this topic.
https://repairpal.com/drive-cycle-emissions-readiness-monitors
Perhaps @alfatech on our Giulia Forum has some hints or tips to help you complete this task as quickly as possible.
 

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We brought our 2017 Giulia in for emissions testing / Ma. inspection sticker the day after the car received it's 25k mile service. It failed because the monitors apparently hadn't reset yet. Then roughly after 10 days of daily driving it failed again. A week later on the 3rd try it passed.
The testing garage didn't seem surprised - not too unusual it seems.
 

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Gee, our LS, S, and Milano don't seem to have this problem. Isn't progress wonderful, lol? These new cars are just too complicated for their own good, me thinks.
 

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Thank you Jason. Alfa Romeo has offered to buy the car back, or make my car and insurance payments while I wait for their 'repair' to be developed and implemented.
 

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Thank you Jason. Alfa Romeo has offered to buy the car back, or make my car and insurance payments while I wait for their 'repair' to be developed and implemented.
I am glad they resolved it in someway. I am going to say they will figure it out and you will be happy. I love this car regardless if it's more complicated. All newer cars have the readiness for emissions.

Might want to go out and drive the heck out of it. Turn it off, let it sit then go out again and push it. Follow what I posted and maybe it will eventually fix it-self. Otherwise go for the buyback and get a new one.
 

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There are some cars that just have some "weird" issues. There should be some kind of an online tech database to search when these issues come up. When I was a tech for the Nissan dealer, when we got one of those cars we could not resolve, we went to the database where all the dealers can report issues and how they were resolved. If that failed it went to the district rep or Nissan support for a resolution.

Sounds like AR is stepping up for customer satisfaction. You have come to a bump in the road, so don't give up. It will get resolved and help others at the same time.
 

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Gee, our LS, S, and Milano don't seem to have this problem. Isn't progress wonderful, lol? These new cars are just too complicated for their own good, me thinks.
I think there are some tradeoffs here to be sure.

The older cars (pre-2006) need a physical inspection, and then they need to be run on the dyno to check emissions.

Cars after 2006 now only need to be plugged in and have their OBDII system report the status of the emissions system. Yes all monitors need to be set to pass.

Personally, I'd take the newer way of doing things any day. Much less chance for the employees of the emisssions testing station to damage your car during an OBDII scan than during the dyno-based smog test.
 

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Depends on the State as to how onerous the checks can be. WA is pretty simple, there being almost no failures, so they said. I've never had an Alfa fail, but then again, our checks were not difficult, not Cal style. Used to be some wheel dyno tests, but later, none. And there were no physical inspections, just a probe up the rear end so to speak. A tester did almost wreck my 91S one time on the wheel dyno when he tried to steer the car when he shouldn't have touched the steering wheel. Boy, was I pissed.

Now they are dropping all checks in the State, in the urban regions where they did the checks, period. Just as our Alfas passed the 25 year old cutoff, lol.
 

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The State of California requires smog check for built after 1975 especially for Southern California. A new car does not need a smog test until it is six years old.
 

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The State of California requires smog check for built after 1975 especially for Southern California. A new car does not need a smog test until it is six years old.
Not exactly. All cars, even new ones, come under the smog test rules but until it's 8 model years old they charge a fee and allow you to skip the test. From the CA DMV site:

"My car is new. Am I still required to get the biennial smog inspection?
Vehicles registered in areas subject to the biennial smog certification program are required to submit evidence of a smog certification every other renewal period. Starting January 1, 2019, owners of vehicles eight or less model years old will pay an annual smog abatement fee for the first eight registration years instead of being required to provide a biennial smog certification."


And it gets even more confusing as requirements seem to vary between counties, and even within zip codes in some counties (including Sonoma where Sportivo1 is). I imagine as an out of state car will not have had that fee paid the underlying requirement then applies.
 

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Gee, our LS, S, and Milano don't seem to have this problem. Isn't progress wonderful, lol? These new cars are just too complicated for their own good, me thinks.
My 2003 Volkswagen couldn't pass the Washington smog test because it had just had service and the computer was cleared of all emissions data when the battery was disconnected.

They told me that I needed to drive it around for a few days and bring it back. Easy peasy.
 
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