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Discussion Starter #1
Hey I'm not too familiar with alfas but I've just acquired some parts from a buddy. Pretty sure they're off of a 2000 spider or maybe a 1900? If anyone can let know what they're too and give me an idea of what they're worth I'd appreciate it.
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Appears to be a head and trans suitable for a 1958-1961 Alfa 2000 Roadster, or the very rare Sprint. I’d guess at least the head was from one of the earlier cars, based upon markings, but would fit any of the years.

The trans could be either the 2000, or slightly later 2600, but the two are not interchangeable due to inputshaft splines, and sometimes bolt pattern on the bell housing flange. It’s hard to tell in your picture if the output flange has four fingers (for an eight-hole giubo), or a six-finger. If it is a four-finger, it’s a 2000 transmission.

Value depends entirely upon whether someone is actively looking. A great many of the cars have rusted away and been scrapped, leaving drivetrain parts piled in the corners of garages. I currently have one freshly rebuilt trans and two usable heads, plus two rebuildable engines. I tend to buy spares I don’t really need, just to have a pile available in a known place in case someone needs something. Unfortunately, the combination of low-demand and high shipping costs restricts how much I’m interested in investing.

By comparison, if someone within driving distance of of you just blew apart their trans, then it might be worth $1,000 to them to drive over and buy yours. The head for the same driving-distance with a cracked head? Maybe $300-500. Maybe.

Where are you located? That would be a major decision point for most buyers.
 

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Appears to be a head and trans suitable for a 1958-1961 Alfa 2000 Roadster, or the very rare Sprint. I’d guess at least the head was from one of the earlier cars, based upon markings, but would fit any of the years.

The trans could be either the 2000, or slightly later 2600, but the two are not interchangeable due to inputshaft splines, and sometimes bolt pattern on the bell housing flange.

Value depends entirely upon whether someone is actively looking. A great many of the cars have rusted away and been scrapped, leaving drivetrain parts piled in the corners of garages. I currently have one freshly rebuilt trans and two usable heads, plus two rebuildable engines. I tend to buy spares I don’t really need, just to have a pile available in a known place in case someone needs something. Unfortunately, the combination of low-demand and high shipping costs restricts how much I’m interested and n investing.

By comparison, if someone within driving distance of of you just blew apart their trans, then it might be worth $1,000 to them to drive over and buy yours. The head for the same driving-distance with a cracked head? Maybe $300-500. Maybe.

Where are you located? That would be a major decision point for most buyers.
Thank you so much for your quick response for that kind of money I may just shelve the parts for now, and for location I am just south of Albany New York.
 

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As you note, your familiarity may be limited. To be transparent, the freight from where you are to me means I’m probably not interested at any price.

For context...

There were only 3,414 of the Roadsters built. All were delivered new with zero rust protection, and so vast numbers of the cars simply evaporated. Over the years, various people have tried to establish how many are remaining, but nobody really knows. 10%? 300 cars worldwide? It’s anyone’s guess. I’d be surprised if there were 100 left in the US, and a much smaller number in operation.

So, waiting for someone who needs one to find you, and your parts, is akin to betting on the lottery. It can happen, but....

I don’t know much about Porsche’s, other than what I learned as a parts-guy, but I’d guess there are more 356 Carreras actively running around in the US than old 2000 Alfas running or languishing in storage in the whole world.

These are kind of unicorn cars, and us owners mostly belong to the same 12-step program. Without success.
 

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BTW, I lived in Binghamton for five of the dreariest years of my life...

Northern Nevada is relentlessly sunny. 😁
 

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BTW, I lived in Binghamton for five of the dreariest years of my life...

Northern Nevada is relentlessly sunny. 😁
Yeah 5 months in my garage without being able to drive is plenty enough time for me to tinker with my cars. Thanks for the information, any early Alfa sighting in NY is quite the treat to me I love the cars.
 

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I agree with Don.

Regarding the head, corrosion may be an issue. To assess value, it would be important to figure out what the head looks like from underneath, and what the cams look like when the valve cover is removed. In other words, the question is: Is the head serviceable or just a discussion piece.

I see 8 nuts on the Giubo, so, I'd say 102 transmission. Typically, value can only be assessed when taken apart.

I haven't seen any significant change in value of used parts over the last 20 years. So, putting the parts on a shelf in hope of a price increase may be disappointing (and largely depends on the cost of storage).
 

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I agree with Don.

Regarding the head, corrosion may be an issue. To assess value, it would be important to figure out what the head looks like from underneath, and what the cams look like when the valve cover is removed. In other words, the question is: Is the head serviceable or just a discussion piece.

I see 8 nuts on the Giubo, so, I'd say 102 transmission. Typically, value can only be assessed when taken apart.

I haven't seen any significant change in value of used parts over the last 20 years. So, putting the parts on a shelf in hope of a price increase may be disappointing (and largely depends on the cost of storage).
Both the head and gearbox have pretty much no visible corrosion the car was parted out in the 80s according to my buddy and the parts have been shelved since. In my opinion the parts easily are in serviceable condition the head has no cracks although a fitting that is pictured was broken apart while in storage and I will upload pictures of the cams and underside of the head tomorrow when I’m down at my shop again.
 

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Yeah 5 months in my garage without being able to drive is plenty enough time for me to tinker with my cars. Thanks for the information, any early Alfa sighting in NY is quite the treat to me I love the cars.

When I moved to Binghamton in 1988 I had an 84 Spider. Three years later, after adding about 500 miles, I realized it was the wrong place for a convertible with marginal heating, so sold it. The rain, snow, and salt didn’t help.

Any 102-2000 living in upstate New York was probably destined to be scrapped within a decade or so of being new, surrendering its parts to someone’s storage bin, and never to serve in a car.

For amusement, I bought my first “2000” in 1971, when it was only 12 years old. I paid $500 for it, and drove it home. Discovered it had a broken crankshaft, so bought an engine advertised in the back of Road and Track for $300! Freight, from upstate New York to Texas, was only $80! The engine donor car in NY had already rusted it’s way to the scrap yard.

Anyway, best wishes for your stuff. There might be an owner in CT or MA or PA that would drive over and give you something for them, but if you’re expecting something more than my estimate, it may be a very long wait.
 

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When I moved to Binghamton in 1988 I had an 84 Spider. Three years later, after adding about 500 miles, I realized it was the wrong place for a convertible with marginal heating, so sold it. The rain, snow, and salt didn’t help.

Any 102-2000 living in upstate New York was probably destined to be scrapped within a decade or so of being new, surrendering its parts to someone’s storage bin, and never to serve in a car.

For amusement, I bought my first “2000” in 1971, when it was only 12 years old. I paid $500 for it, and drove it home. Discovered it had a broken crankshaft, so bought an engine advertised in the back of Road and Track for $300! Freight, from upstate New York to Texas, was only $80! The engine donor car in NY had already rusted it’s way to the scrap yard.

Anyway, best wishes for your stuff. There might be an owner in CT or MA or PA that would drive over and give you something for them, but if you’re expecting something more than my estimate, it may be a very long wait.
Ah I wish cars were still that cheap those were the good days. Well I’m hoping for a few thousand dollars for the head and transmission based on the 102 head and gearbox that are on eBay right now and for as the reason the car was parted out supposedly it was involved in more than a few collisions.
 

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I just looked at the two pieces you referenced.

The big, and only, variable with 2000 parts is whether someone needs them RIGHT NOW to get back on the road. The South Carolina vendor appears to be some sort of scrap yard, so it makes some sense for them to constantly have EBay ads for the one or two parts cars they have in their lot. They are fishing in a pond that may have one fish, but most of the time, has none.

Different than mass produced cars like MGs, Triumphs, Porsches, etc, there isn’t enough demand to be able to define a “market price” for parts. I’d wager the South Carolina merchant has never sold a head or trans for these cars. The last trans I bought cost me $1,500, and included a complete, high-performance version of the standard 2000 engine. I’m driving that engine now, and reckon the trans came for free.

I really hope some desperate, nearby owner has a need, and finds you. I’m sad when these special cars stop being driven. That’s why I tend to accumulate spares. 2000 owners mostly know how to find me.
 

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I just looked at the two pieces you referenced.

The big, and only, variable with 2000 parts is whether someone needs them RIGHT NOW to get back on the road. The South Carolina vendor appears to be some sort of scrap yard, so it makes some sense for them to constantly have EBay ads for the one or two parts cars they have in their lot. They are fishing in a pond that may have one fish, but most of the time, has none.

Different than mass produced cars like MGs, Triumphs, Porsches, etc, there isn’t enough demand to be able to define a “market price” for parts. I’d wager the South Carolina merchant has never sold a head or trans for these cars. The last trans I bought cost me $1,500, and included a complete, high-performance version of the standard 2000 engine. I’m driving that engine now, and reckon the trans came for free.

I really hope some desperate, nearby owner has a need, and finds you. I’m sad when these special cars stop being driven. That’s why I tend to accumulate spares. 2000 owners mostly know how to find me.
Yeah I get they might not be worth that much to very many people because they’re so rare I might just put them on the classifieds here or eBay and see what offers I get.
 

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Last night I recalled an event that taught us several lessons. Funny lessons.

I worked for BAP/Geon for about 15 years, from the early 70’s through late 80s. This era saw the adoption of computer controlled inventory.

BAP/Geon got its start when “Imported Car” mostly meant British sports cars, Volkswagens, and the beginning of the German resurgence, among other low-volume oddities. Our catalogs listed parts for Borgwards, Hillmans, Rileys, NSUs, Rovers, plus the more successful MGs, Triumphs, etc. By the mid 80s the Japanese had taken over, VW was no longer the big dog, and England was out of the race.

Our mainframe computer had many hundreds of thousands of active part numbers, and an untold number of no-longer-active. The computer would assign activity codes, such as “A” for super hot sellers, “C” for reliable but not hot sellers, and “D” and “X” for parts that weren’t selling much or at all.

A fellow used to visit one of our Southern California stores every few months to buy an oil filter for his Hillman Minx (or maybe an Imp. Don’t recall now). He was the only purchaser of this part in the entire US. Being a very low-selling part, but still more than zero, the computer assigned a code of “D”. This triggered the pricing algorithms to interpret that we were pricing the filter too high, and each successive pricelist would reveal a price decrease, under the mechanical belief that there was a market for this part, and if we found the right price point, we’d sell more.

One day the Hillman owner came in to buy his filter. He told the manager that we were the only place in the US that had his filter, and to his knowledge his Minx was the only remaining operable example in the country. Given this, he was curious why, every time he visited, the part was a little cheaper?

After a quick huddle and phone call to the warehouse, we offered him a sweetheart deal if he’d just take all of our remaining stock. He agreed, and we freed up some shelf space and capital to invest in better selling products.

We learned that computers do an OK job of managing big numbers.
Unique, low-volume products are best handled by people within niche organizations.
Men will pay $3.00 for a $2.00 part if they need it now.
Women will pay $2.00 for a $3.00 part they don’t need.
Parts with zero predictable demand are best gotten rid of and something better done with the space and capital.

By the way, these same principles apply to the stock market. I just sold out of a position taking about a $25,000 loss, as I could see no near-term improvement. That money will shortly be reinvested in something where I can anticipate an improvement.

The best loss is the first loss.

Sorry for the rant. Thought you might enjoy how our early “Skynet” fooled us.
 

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Last night I recalled an event that taught us several lessons. Funny lessons.

I worked for BAP/Geon for about 15 years, from the early 70’s through late 80s. This era saw the adoption of computer controlled inventory.

BAP/Geon got its start when “Imported Car” mostly meant British sports cars, Volkswagens, and the beginning of the German resurgence, among other low-volume oddities. Our catalogs listed parts for Borgwards, Hillmans, Rileys, NSUs, Rovers, plus the more successful MGs, Triumphs, etc. By the mid 80s the Japanese had taken over, VW was no longer the big dog, and England was out of the race.

Our mainframe computer had many hundreds of thousands of active part numbers, and an untold number of no-longer-active. The computer would assign activity codes, such as “A” for super hot sellers, “C” for reliable but not hot sellers, and “D” and “X” for parts that weren’t selling much or at all.

A fellow used to visit one of our Southern California stores every few months to buy an oil filter for his Hillman Minx (or maybe an Imp. Don’t recall now). He was the only purchaser of this part in the entire US. Being a very low-selling part, but still more than zero, the computer assigned a code of “D”. This triggered the pricing algorithms to interpret that we were pricing the filter too high, and each successive pricelist would reveal a price decrease, under the mechanical belief that there was a market for this part, and if we found the right price point, we’d sell more.

One day the Hillman owner came in to buy his filter. He told the manager that we were the only place in the US that had his filter, and to his knowledge his Minx was the only remaining operable example in the country. Given this, he was curious why, every time he visited, the part was a little cheaper?

After a quick huddle and phone call to the warehouse, we offered him a sweetheart deal if he’d just take all of our remaining stock. He agreed, and we freed up some shelf space and capital to invest in better selling products.

We learned that computers do an OK job of managing big numbers.
Unique, low-volume products are best handled by people within niche organizations.
Men will pay $3.00 for a $2.00 part if they need it now.
Women will pay $2.00 for a $3.00 part they don’t need.
Parts with zero predictable demand are best gotten rid of and something better done with the space and capital.

By the way, these same principles apply to the stock market. I just sold out of a position taking about a $25,000 loss, as I could see no near-term improvement. That money will shortly be reinvested in something where I can anticipate an improvement.

The best loss is the first loss.

Sorry for the rant. Thought you might enjoy how our early “Skynet” fooled us.
haha I bet that guys still stocked with oil filters to this day Don!
 
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