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Discussion Starter #1
The front bumper on my 1991 spider was low on the passenger side and I could see a zip tie and a piece of rubber where the previous owner tried to jury rig it. I took the bumper off and found the bracket that attaches to the shock absorber to the bumper was not attached to the aluminum piece in the bumper.
The bracket should be attached to the aluminum bumper with steel rivets, and all four on the passenger side were broken. Three rivets on the drives side were broken as well. The reason the factory used rivets is because one side is "blind", that is you can not access it because of the shape of the bracket.
Instead of using rivets I decided to use screws. On the blind side I used 5/16 square nuts held on with double sided tape. The double sided tape held the nuts in place while I hand stared the screws. The square nut is big enough that it hits the side of the bracket when you tighten the screw and that keeps it from spinning.
I used a chamfer bit to accept the flat heads and then used 5/16 flat head screws on the blind side and 1/4 flat head on the side I could get a wrench on. I put thread locker on all the screws.
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But Mad North-Northwest
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Nice work. Probably more durable than the rivets. I think if you nail the bottom of the bumper on a curb it tends to shear the rivets: I know mine were broken on one side before I fixed them.
 

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Nice work. Probably more durable than the rivets. I think if you nail the bottom of the bumper on a curb it tends to shear the rivets: I know mine were broken on one side before I fixed them.
Nice one. I like the idea of the double sided tape to hold the nuts whilst you start the screws, I will definitely keep that in mind for future use.
 

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Nice work!
can I just ask why you didn't separate the outer plastic shell from the inner steel brace?....I am guessing once separated, you could have used blind rivets again.
Perhaps they designed rivets there so that they DO shear when you nail the bumper on a curb? (which with bolts might split the bumper)
I suppose the secret is don't nail the curb:)

nb. to remove the front badge you'd need to separate the two parts to get at the badge mount from behind...what a lot of palava for a badge:(
front bumper badge.jpg
 

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nb. to remove the front badge you'd need to separate the two parts to get at the badge mount from behind...what a lot of palava for a badge
Only if you do it properly ;). I bet most would prise the old out and glue a new one in. Actually, can you get new ones?
 

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Discussion Starter #6
Nice work!
can I just ask why you didn't separate the outer plastic shell from the inner steel brace?....I am guessing once separated, you could have used blind rivets again.
Perhaps they designed rivets there so that they DO shear when you nail the bumper on a curb? (which with bolts might split the bumper)
I suppose the secret is don't nail the curb:)

nb. to remove the front badge you'd need to separate the two parts to get at the badge mount from behind...what a lot of palava for a badge:(
View attachment 1613113
I did remove the outer plastic bumper from the aluminum piece. I had to do that to chamfer the outboard side of the aluminum piece to accept the flat head screws. My thinking was the original steel rivets were sheared and that screws would be stronger.
 

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Only if you do it properly ;). I bet most would prise the old out and glue a new one in. Actually, can you get new ones?
same as rear
75mm emblem with 2 pins and an outer circle of sticky (at least my rear badge had 2 pins and sticky...I snipped off the pins as the rear takes no pins)
 
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