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Discussion Starter #1
I don't know about other years, but the 1989 Spider hood is held in place on the hinge by 4 10mm nuts. The nuts screw onto studs on a slip plate beneath the hood's sheet metal underside. The right 2 came off with out issue, but the left 2 wrung off despite my soaking them with WD-40. I then discovered that the studs were attached to a sliding plate, with no way to access it easily to remediate the broken studs. My only thought has been to make 2 parallel cuts to the sheet metal underside, bend it up, remove the plate and remediate with appropriate bolts, and then reweld the sheet metal with my MIG. Does anyone have any other alternative approaches as I can't be the only person to have faced this unfortunate circumstance. Thanks in advance.
 

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(hello from Mebane, NC)

My only advise - too late to actually be useful - is that WD40 is essentially useless for that purpose. I use PB Blaster. Kroil is also well regarded. Apply daily for 3-5 days then if the bolt/screw begins to turn re-apply and slowly work it back & forth with more applications along the way.
 

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well that's a pain....:(

maybe cut that whole cover plate neatly off with dremel (rather than bending it up after cutting slits), remove the sliding plate, weld on new studs, put back and weld back on the cover plate.....grind welds smooth and paint.

It needs to slide to allow some adjustment when fitting the hood.

(or you might be lucky and find a used hood in the color of your car, they usually cost about 100-150$)
 

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Discussion Starter #4
That's what I"m basically planning. Wish there was a more creative way to go about it, but I can't see what that would be.
 

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(hello from Mebane, NC)

My only advise - too late to actually be useful - is that WD40 is essentially useless for that purpose. I use PB Blaster. Kroil is also well regarded. Apply daily for 3-5 days then if the bolt/screw begins to turn re-apply and slowly work it back & forth with more applications along the way.
try this stuff: Freeze-Off


 

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well that's a pain....:(

maybe cut that whole cover plate neatly off with dremel (rather than bending it up after cutting slits), remove the sliding plate, weld on new studs, put back and weld back on the cover plate.....grind welds smooth and paint.

It needs to slide to allow some adjustment when fitting the hood.

(or you might be lucky and find a used hood in the color of your car, they usually cost about 100-150$)
There is enough meat in those plates to drill and tap. Use a little JB weld when you thread in the stud. I replaced one stud on the hood of my car using this method and it's been fine.
 

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Maybe soak it again with PB Blaster and try a counter clockwise easy out, they may break free. If not why not just drill them out and retap plate with appropriate oversize bolt?
 

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Discussion Starter #8
Pictorial Review of Bonnet Hinge Bracket Repair

I decided to go ahead and cut out the offending area, remediate, and then reweld and paint. My welding (MIG) was less than stellar. I turned the amps way down and still was blowing out some of the thinner areas. When I ground the welds down, I was afraid that I'd remove the weld strength. It was between 18 and 20 gauge sheet metal originally. It worked despite the lack of cosmetic beauty. Hear are the pictures with commentary.
 

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Discussion Starter #9
More on bracket repair

You can see the pocket in which the bonnet stud plate sits and slides.
 

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Discussion Starter #10
Stud plate and metal pocket, grinding rivets

The title describes it.
 

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Discussion Starter #11
Welding it back, grinding, painting , and back on car

As I said, I struggled with the welding and the finished job is adequate to support the hood. If were to find an inexpensive hood replacement, were I to try and sell the car at some point, I'd go with that. However, this car is intended to be a decent driver and I'm going to enjoy it for a number of years so I don't care that it's less than perfect. It was good practice for sure. I have lots of other project cars (not Alfas) several of which are going to require some serious body work so I'm going to get plenty of practice.

Hope this helps someone else facing a similar circumstance.
 

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