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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited by Moderator)
I own a well maintained 1988 Spider Veloce with fuel injection. I ran out of fuel due to a bad gauge (and not paying attention) and when I added a couple gallons of fuel, it wouldn't start. I'm concerned that there is a vapor barrier in the fuel line. Any suggestions about how to prime the fuel line to get it started again?
 

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Is it really a 1968 spider or a 1986 spider with Bosch fuel injection? If it's a Bosch, the fuel system should be self purging, if the fuel pumps are working during cranking. There are two fuel pumps, one in the tank and the one under the car. They both need to be in good shape with only a couple gallons in the tank.
Running any fuel injected vehicle out of gas is really super hard on it, lots of components in the fuel system use the gas for lubrication.
 

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Either way, remove a fuel line at the front and see if any fuel comes out, in a can or other safe manner. Sometimes if you run out, the gunge at the bottom of the tank gets picked up and then clogs the filter, then dries and cakes.

If it's a Spica car, you have a fuel pressure light.

Andrew
 

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Discussion Starter #4 (Edited by Moderator)
Is it really a 1968 spider or a 1986 spider with Bosch fuel injection? If it's a Bosch, the fuel system should be self purging, if the fuel pumps are working during cranking. There are two fuel pumps, one in the tank and the one under the car. They both need to be in good shape with only a couple gallons in the tank.
Running any fuel injected vehicle out of gas is really super hard on it, lots of components in the fuel system use the gas for lubrication.
My Alfa is a 1988 Spider Veloce Graduate (50 State US version), and it does have Bosch fuel injection. That you for your suggestions, I will get back to you with the results in the next few days.
 

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Discussion Starter #5 (Edited by Moderator)
Either way, remove a fuel line at the front and see if any fuel comes out, in a can or other safe manner. Sometimes if you run out, the gunge at the bottom of the tank gets picked up and then clogs the filter, then dries and cakes.

If it's a Spica car, you have a fuel pressure light.

Andrew
Either way, remove a fuel line at the front and see if any fuel comes out, in a can or other safe manner. Sometimes if you run out, the gunge at the bottom of the tank gets picked up and then clogs the filter, then dries and cakes.

If it's a Spica car, you have a fuel pressure light.

Andrew
Thanks for your suggestions, I will get back to you with the results in the next few days. (I verified that my Alfa is a 1988 Spider Veloce Graduate (50 State US version), and it does have Bosch fuel injection).
 

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The in tank pump is, in my opinion, a problematic design. The pump itself is something of a POS. Then, it's connected by a rubber hose to the line above it. Rubber and gas do no long coexist, so it's possible that even if the pump is still working, the hose has failed in some manner.

It's not all that hard to pull out the fuel level sender/pump assembly and have a look. Frankly, I would find a new hose and pump before doing so, and just change them as a preemptive strike.
 
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Discussion Starter #8
Can you run a jumper wire from the positive battery cable to the middle wire on the in tank pump and see if you hear the pumps running?
Thanks for this suggestion...
The in tank pump is, in my opinion, a problematic design. The pump itself is something of a POS. Then, it's connected by a rubber hose to the line above it. Rubber and gas do no long coexist, so it's possible that even if the pump is still working, the hose has failed in some manner.

It's not all that hard to pull out the fuel level sender/pump assembly and have a look. Frankly, I would find a new hose and pump before doing so, and just change them as a preemptive strike.
The in tank pump is, in my opinion, a problematic design. The pump itself is something of a POS. Then, it's connected by a rubber hose to the line above it. Rubber and gas do no long coexist, so it's possible that even if the pump is still working, the hose has failed in some manner.

It's not all that hard to pull out the fuel level sender/pump assembly and have a look. Frankly, I would find a new hose and pump before doing so, and just change them as a preemptive strike.
Thank you for your advice...we will work on this issue on Sunday and I will report back. I apologize that I managed to enter the wrong year of my Spider, twice...it is a 1988 Spider Veloce.
 

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Our Spider just did the same thing a few months ago. The gas gauge was reading low (around 1/8 tank) and it seemed like the car ran out of gas. Turns out the original under car fuel pump was just dead. You should be able to feel it working with the engine cranking. When you turn the ignition on you should hear the in tank pump prime. Then when cranking I believe the main pump turns on. If your fuel lines are original it may be a good opportunity to replace them all.
 

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I ran my spider out of gas once. Had to jumper the wire on the in tank fuel pump to prime the main. It’s likely just air in the fuel lines.
 

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I ran my spider out of gas once. Had to jumper the wire on the in tank fuel pump to prime the main. It’s likely just air in the fuel lines.
That is what I always do when I replace pumps and/or tanks. Good advice IMHO
 

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Discussion Starter #12
Well, it was the distributor cap/rotor that caused the problem, not running out of gas. Once we got the cap & rotor it started right up and life is good. Thank you all for your feedback, it is good to know the Alfa community is out there looking after each other.
 
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