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Discussion Starter #1
Hi, i know it's been talked about many times but I'd like some advice on restricting the body roll on my gtv, I've put on new shocks front and back plus I've replaced all the bushes front and back, she now handles really well but for the body roll.Everything is stock size including roll bars, I don't want a race car but just to stop the body roll that is there when I'm giving her a bit of stick out in the country, thanks for all replies.
 

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25.4 mm anti roll bars are available for the front. Early GTV6's have different length torsion bars than Milano's which limits your options for stiffening the suspension. Or you could fit gas shocks such as Bilsteins which increase the spring rate.
 

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On my own GTV6 project, the 25mm front sway bar was recommended by someone wiser than I on such issues. I have one from a Milano Verde to use. If you are going with a stiffer sway bar it's also recommended that you use the two doubler gussets that get welded at the mounting points. Certainly for a 27mm or larger, and not a bad idea for a 25mm. You don't want to have the bolts ripping out of the chassis under hard use. I'm going the extra mile on the gussets too.

I questioned whether the stiffer bar in the front (keeping the original diameter bar in the rear) might increase understeer. I was told that would be the case, but not to a noticeable degree. Was also assured that this minor upgrade would not kill the ride. So, I'll trust the experts and convert to new poly bushings and better shocks, as well.

My last question involved a poly bushing on the front tip of the deDion triangle vs an SZ spherical ball. The answer was that I would be pleased with how the SZ ball tied the suspension all together... but may not be happy with the extra noise back there. So still processing cheaper/quieter poly bushing vs adding some sound insulation in the area of the SZ ball.

Peter
 

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I drove on the track with a 27mm front sway bar and stock rear bar and also 27 mm torsion bars and stiffer rear springs. The understeer was only noticeable in tight turns. I drove Milano Verdes for years and they did not understeer,
 

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If you go with a 25mm front sway bar and a larger rear bar, you'll be pleased with the roll resistance and the ride won't really suffer. Good shocks,like Konis or Bilsteins, also settle out pitching and jounce motions. Take Peter's suggestion though, and weld on those reinforcing plates to the front sway bar mount points. Get them and the bigger rear bar, from Performatek:
 

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Why the bigger rear bar? If I were running a 25 mm front bar I would experiment with a lighter rear from an Alfetta. Also, provided your existing sheet metal is good you don't need re-enforcing plates. Even 27 mm bars may not need them for street use. I ran 27 front and stock rear and the car was well balanced.
 

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Just my preference, Ed... I like a somewhat flat cornering chassis. And I like to keep the front to rear characteristics fairly stock, not getting either twitchy at the rear nor plowing too much at the front. That's why I would upgrade both bars, personally.
 

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Discussion Starter #8
Well the consensus seems to be at least a larger Front roll bar, my trip yesterday of about 150ks was going well till i got a small rock thrown up by an oncoming car putting a nice ding in my windscreen, it made the rest of my trip to give the old girl a blow out a bit miserable
 

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Mike,
My perspective is that rear sway bars increase oversteer which may be a good thing in autocross and low speed driving but can be unnerving at high speed. 116 cars are certainly less inclined to oversteer than 105's but they still want to step out when you get hard on the gas exiting a turn. I think that you will find that most of the guys racing GTV6's have BIG bars on the front and something more like stock on the rear.
 

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The problem with the 116 chassis is the roll axis....really low at the front, under ground level, and high at the rear. That’s why people put on knuckle risers and the like. It’s why they knell as they roll.

if everything else is standard a larger front anti-roll / sway bar helps. It’s just increasing the resistance, not fixing the problem that’s ok and good if that’s all you want or need.

Ultimately if the roll axis issue is fixed you can roll back (pun intended 😊) the front roll stiffness. In one of our track cars, an early GT, we completely removed the bar and it handled really well.

Anyway, that’s my experience.
 

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From the factory, GTV6's have soft suspensions that understeer heavily. If you have already replaced all of the rubber, the traditional steps to improving a GTV6s handling are as follows:

Step 1 - Replace the rear sway with a heavier model which will stiffen up the back a little and dial out some of the understeer. Most of the current rear sways bars currently available have adjustable bar ends so you can tune the suspension to your liking.

Step 2 - Add heavier rear springs with a heavier front sway bar. As others have mentioned, if you add a larger front sway bar, the installing reinforcement plates at the same time is a must.

Step 3 - Replace the front the front torsion bars with larger ones. 25.4mm are a nice upgrade for a street driven car and they retain good ride quality, but 27mm torsion bars are available if you track the car.

Step 4 - Dropped spindles from RJR. They correct the front suspension geometry in lowered cars and produced a lighter steering effort that dials out oversteer.

Some other suspension comments:

Most people prefer Koni's over Bilsteins for these cars.

I was told that the poly bushing offers 90% of the improvement of a SZ bearing with none of the squeaks.

You can skip the above and go directly to a coilover system. Alfa 9 and OKP sell these systems, and you can have them made to order in terms of ride height and suspension stiffness.

Alfa 9 Coilover

OKP Coilover
 

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My GTV6 had Richard's dropped spindle uprights and 16" wheels. There may not be sufficient clearance with 15" wheels.
Agree regarding torsion bars and springs. 25.4 bars are a good upgrade and are easy to install. Installation of 27 mm torsion bars is more complex.
 

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You can find larger torsion bars for the early gtv6 as well. And more than one formula to getting the set up right for you.

Cheapest set-up, get some really sticky tires on the stock wheels. Leave the rest alone besides what you have done, live with the Alfa roll. I will haul on back roads despite the body roll.

My brother recently acquired a nice 2.5 Milano platinum and is going a very cost effective but comprehensive route: stiffer/lower rear springs, konis, bigger front sway bar, better brake pads, add a little cam, 3.0 radiator, lose the cat, new stock/poly bushings, rebuilt shift linkage, good tires...done. You can get matched front bar and rear springs from Alfaholics or others.

I have done a lot more to my two GTV6s, both with 3.0, one built for the street and back roads, the other usable on street and track. I spent a lot of money, not sure I wouldn't be just as happy with the less aggressive approach. If you want to go fast in an Alfa buy a used 4cyl Guilia to "tune" to 400hp with an ECU flash and new exhaust and brake pads.

But then I get in and drive any GTV6 or Milano, stock or modified...heaven!
 
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