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Oh I must of been mistaken. I thought they offered it. When you say "stiffer" springs. What do you mean? What springs?? Sorry I have only had the car now for three years... I change parts as they break, most times with up grades....
Thanks
 

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Discussion Starter #102
In a distributor, it has weights that swing out with centrifugal force. They have springs to hold the weights in. So, for a given weight and a given spring, at XXXX RPM, the weights will swing out and the ignition timing advances. If you make the weight lighter, or the spring stronger, the weights won't swing out until a higher centrifugal force, or RPM. It's what is commonly referred to as recurving a distributor. Basically, changing the advance curve to better suit the exact engine.

I have an older friend that has a Porsche shop, mostly retired now, but he has an old Sun distributor machine, so I may put the old Magnetti one in, and this one, and look at the shankle curves. I'm at altitude, will have a slightly better intake, mild cams and a better than original exhaust, but original (low) compression. I think some slightly stronger springs to delay the initial advancing might be all it needs.

The fully mechanical (non vacuum advance like mine) distributors are known to start throwing in advance as low as 600rpm, which is silly. I'm not sure if this has the same mechanical advance as those or not. I also don't know if Centerline recurves theirs at all.
 

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Dam! Nice to know... And you! Thank you. Very interesting. I bought my 79 Alfetta from the original owner who put in a electronic ignition, with a external "black" box from Western Controls. It was slowly putting out lower and lower spark. So I replaced it with a Ignitor.... New Cap, rotor and wires. Still no spark.. I saw your Dis. on EBay.. I'll see if still available... Thank you for info... BTW I'm in Northern California.
Stay Safe
T
 

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Discussion Starter #104
I recommend NOT getting one of them without vaccum advance, FYI, and search for electronic ignitions on here to find out what to buy before you do.

There are a few different versions of electronic adapters you can use with a points distributor to convert to electronic, or complete distributors you can buy. You an also get an MSD or similar ignition controller box to give you some additional control and features (multiple spark, rev limiter, etc)
 

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Discussion Starter #106
Hmm. Makes part throttle accel and mpg (and cyl head temps) much better, IMO
 

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Oh..? Good to know.. Was just looking on EBay one Flame thrower model# D185504 for $208- looks like I need to place a order!
 

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Discussion Starter #108
I plan to take this one a Classic Car Adventures rally when it's done, so reliability (and spares for stuff that wouldn't be at a local parts store) is paramount. Benefit of that is, once the wrinkles are ironed out, it should be pretty reliable, in addition to way faster and more fun than original.
 

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At the risk of sounding like a curmudgeon, I'd recommend getting this car back on the road asap and drive it as much as you can to see what it needs before replacing so many parts. With replacing so many items you are likely to end up chasing reliability and if its not performing right it will be tough to tell what change is causing the problems. Ive found in reviving mine that they are very reliable and handling is better than expected once basic sorting is done. Just my .02.
 

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Discussion Starter #111
I appreciate the input, but I've done this type of a build to many, many cars before. If it was my first one, you would be totally right. In this situation, I think I'll be OK because i know to expect those wrinkles to iron out.

I'll likely not do the distributor or cams until it's back on the road. And then do them one at a time, because driveability issues there could be really hard to chase and it's my first Alfa. I do have the benefit of a shop neighbor who has been working on and modifying them since new. He has a 250hp turbo Alfa spider he's put 200k on.
 

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Wow, that sounds very cool. This is my first Alfa... But not first Italian car. Had a 124 spyder. Years ago... I do have some professional mechanics to take a look at it... But I need to drive it to them.....
 

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Discussion Starter #114
I have a 1981 Fiat Spider for sale right now. I bought it from a literal, one owner little old lady as an automatic. Couldn't sell it, even at very discounted price from book. So, in a weekend, did a 5 speed swap and have relisted it. Great little cars. Surprisingly advanced for their design date.

 

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@greggearhead No problem, just sanity checking you. I know you've done a lot of cars (love that Mk1) and so have I, but these cars are a bit different and its taken me a while to understand it and get a better feel for it. I've have taken mine on 4 or 5 hard rallies in the year and a half or so I've owned it and my views about what I thought I wanted to change from when I got it to now have evolved quite a lot. Have fun with it!
 

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Discussion Starter #116
It's all good. I'm old enough to welcome any input and criticism.

Not much progress today - I had to watch an auction I was selling a vehicle for this morning, but at least got a few hours of garage cleaning and work done this afternoon. Got the last Rial center ring assembled (had some chipped paint so I had to touch it up). The brake fittings are not leaking now - but no pressure yet so it's a very small victory. I successfully pulled the SPICA mechanical fuel injection pump pulley. I started days ago, removing the nut, spraying some penetrating oil on it, and tapping lightly and prying lightly. No luck. I googled, and found out not only is it a keyed pulley, it's a taper fit and pretty tight. I got a special pulley puller for the task from my shop neighbors Concours Cars, who work on all kinds of classic and modern Euro stuff. It went in through the holes in the pulley to pull near the center where the pulley is stronger and less likely to break.

More spray lube, slowly cranking down, tapping lightly with a hammer, then WHAM! It let loose and flew off. I had some rags in front of it, anticipating, but ****, it really came off like a bullet. Once off, I could see decades of oil sludge residue, making me feel good for getting the pulley off to replace the seal.

I'm not done cleaning the pump and area yet, but a couple cans of brake clean and rags later, and at least I can see the stuff and not worry about large chunks of stuff falling in there when the seal is removed. The pump internals need to be pretty clean because of the really tight machined tolerances. After I do the seal, I'll do the tiny oil filter and drain the oil and sludge out of it and replace it from the splash lubed section.

Since I am going with cams that might be a touch over the capability of the stock fuel pump deliver curve so I have a Shankle Sure-Start mechanical actuator to replace the thermostatic actuator. Basically, replacing the automatic temperature sensitive choke on the pump with a mechanical/manual one. That will allow me to grossly move the fuel delivery curve slightly up or down, compensating for the needs of the bigger cams if they are too much (and make it run lean). I will be running an air-fuel ratio gauge to make sure I'm OK either way.


 

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My favorites are the grey AWD Vanagon and the Malaga 5 series! I had two 124 Spiders way back - a '70 and a '71. I think it was a really good car, although I was a broke student and bought beat-up examples in sketchy condition.
 

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Hey @greggearhead , no criticism at all - been enjoying the project! (y)

What cams are you contemplating? Those are likely in my future. Interesting you are thinking of the sure start as a mixure adjuster. I guess after a cold start you'd have to make sure ot put it back in the right spot. Do you have one wih the lever? My uninstalled one is supposed to hook to the hand throttle, but I'd like to retain that function if possible.

I've yet to change my pump filter due to the smog pump. I'm planning to hook my smog pump back up and want to see if its any good first before removing it.

Was the Fiat on BAT? Trying not to look at that much these days.
 

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Discussion Starter #119
Thanks. I've got the 'normal' Euro cam to use as an exhaust cam with about 10.1mm lift. Then I have an alquanti cam with about 11mm lift to use on the intake. At sealevel would put me over the limit of the SPICA without and rebuild/reconfigure. At 6500ft, where there is 20% less air, I should be totally fine. But with the AFR gauge and the manual choke, worst case I can make it work.
 

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Discussion Starter #120
Fiat has not been on BAT. If it doesn't sell, it might go there. I sold a LS3 swapped Land Rover on there today. Went cheap for what it is.
 
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