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Discussion Starter #1
I've given up on recovering my 65 SZ, so... Time to move on. found a 1978 Alfetta sitting, last registered in 2004 in California (now in Texas). Owner claims it was running 5 years ago. Very very original 77k car, no dents, only visible rust is on back window lower corners, each side, about 1" wide. Red, manual, A/C, injected.... so...

Before I buy this for $2000 (price is firm he said)... what do I really look for. Not 100% sure he will let me try and fire it up, but If I do so it will be after seeing what condition the gas is in, or running it off a sealed tank I bring.

I tried to buy a copy of the Alfa Bible off Amazon, but it was sold out....

I'll try and take some pics today, have to move it outside first.
 

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Coupe or sedan?
I've owned 6 coupes throughout my life because I love the design.
Rust is obviously the biggest factor with these cars because the Soviet-sourced steel had no zinc blended in to help prevent it.
It hides in the upper front fender wells, door bottoms, around the rear windows and tail lights.
Driveshaft flex disks need to be checked out. 1978's have the later style driveshaft with the improved design.
The injection pump has a small oil filter that needs to be replaced with regular oil changes.
Check the front sway bar mounts. These some times pull out if the cars has been driven hard or been autocrossed because the steel lacks the tensile strength of better steel.
They are fabulous cars if they are looked after and kept dry.

I'm sure other Alfetta owners will chime in.

Good luck with your Alfetta!
 

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Agreed. They do tend to rust but they are quite fun. The nice thing about the GTV6 is they are so much quicker. I have a copy of the Alfa Bible and can lend it to you if you need it. Where are you located?
 

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Discussion Starter #4
Arlington, Texas... and now that you mention the GTV6... seems like I might be better holding off til I found one of those. I do like my speed, I have 3 SAAB 9-5 Aeros, one pushing 300hp, so I can't go to slow.. I'll personally rust and fall apart
 

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Im not a GTV6 guru, but I doubt that you could easily get anywhere close to 300 hp from a 2.5 L. Not to say it's impossible but... I think that Alfetta GT coupes have a lot of merit, especially in the handling department. The Nord motor is easier to maintain and less expensive to rebuild. Either way you go, you will enjoy it. Here's a site to GTV6: http://alfagtv6.com

I would pay attention to the shift linkage and condition of the rear brakes. The inboard brakes are not as easy to overhaul...
 

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If you are looking at the 78 Alfetta, know that they don't really rust much, just at the bottoms of the windows, but not wholesale like the 75/76 and maybe the 77's.

We put 180k miles on our 78 sedan in Seattle, and we had no rust worth talking about, just that little bit at the front window. The body and interior remained pristine, and the car now lives a nice life south of Boston with a new owner.
 

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personally I like the 4 better than the 6. Lighter and handles better. Me? I'd be looking for rust, driveline donuts. condition of the oil for signs of coolant intrusion and if it's Spica, ensure it runs well and there's no hint of gasoline smell in the oil. ciao, jc
 

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I had a '79 that I owned and drove daily for about 7 years or so. As noted the most common rust areas are the corners of the windshield, rear hatch window and tail lights. The Spica injection system sitting for ten years with rotten fuel is probably not going to be a good thing. A new pump or conversion to carbs if you live in a state that will allow that will be about $1500.

It's a fun car no doubt but unless you have the desire and ability to rebuild and pump up the 2 liter you'll probably find it to be somewhat anemic. Ergo the reason it ultimately evolved into the GTV6. Other advantages of the GTV6 are that there are just a lot more of them available and it has the very commonly understood Bosch EFI. The Alfa V6 has a few issues in regards to the timing belt but they are well understood and the engine itself is well regarded as being one of the most wonderful sounding things on Earth.
 

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Discussion Starter #9
I actually don't want to modify an alfa too far from stock, I just fear getting one that is too doscile, if that makes sense. I was used to the "performance" of my 65 SZ because it was an older Alfa, and now I'm spoiled by turbos. I'm thinking that $2k might be a bit high for a Alfetta now. There are no GTV6s within 500 miles of me at the moment, might have to do a roadtrip and bring one back... adventure time (bring duct tape, wire, tools, blanket, and a sense of humor)
 
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