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Discussion Starter #1
I'm having my GTV repainted and the body shop recommends removing the windshield. This is the original windshield in a US version car and it is in great shape. Is it possible to remove and put it back in without major complications Anyone with experience at this? Also I see you can purchase the windshield seal at a couple of Alfa parts suppliers- is there a universal seal that works for the US version car. My cars current frame does not have any rubber exposed as I've seen on many other GTV's that appear to have windshields that were replaced.
 

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'72-'74 have glue-in windshields. All you should see is the anodized trim on the outside. You won't see any exposed rubber gasket (inside or out). Removing the trim and gasket is a crap shoot IMO. The trim may bend and the glass may break. I doubt anyone would guaranty removal without the possibility of breakage, especially on a 50 year old car. Finding a replacement glue in windshield will be a real challenge; most will then need to convert over to a gasketed windshield and that has its own issues with trim fitment.

If it were me, I'd leave it as-is and live with any paint masking residue on the trim. If you need to replace the headliner, then the glass would need to come out regardless. Just my $0.02 worth. I'm sure others will have varying opinions. My biggest fear driving is a stone in the windshield...
 

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Discussion Starter #3
Thanks for your advice- I'm on the fence on this. Leaving it in avoids a lot of worry and potential problems. This is a super nice all original two owner car that I'm keeping original as possible.
 

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Thanks for your advice- I'm on the fence on this. Leaving it in avoids a lot of worry and potential problems. This is a super nice all original two owner car that I'm keeping original as possible.
That being said, I would leave it alone, but...

Is the paint shop recommending you remove the windshield to make their life easier (no need to worry about masking or scuffing up the trim) or are there signs of corrosion in the usual areas at the base of the A pillar? Even if you don't see any rust bubbles, there is a likelihood of rust under the trim in these corners. So if you decide to remove the windshield, be prepared for some metal work.

Other factors are your intent for using the car... driver, show, both? storage inside or out? How perfect do you want the car and other than a repaint, what work does it need? I can see these factors keeping you on the fence, so only you know the best answer for your situation.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
All good points I've been thinking about. The car is not going to be a Concours candidate, but it will be entered in regional shows, mainly for fun. I plan to drive the car but will be kept out of rain and stored in a garage. There's a small amount of rust bubbles at the bottom of each corner, however the resto shop can make it look really good. Its more a matter of how long before that comes back? The kicker is by removing the windshield the cost of the job will go up a lot which includes labor and cost of a windshield if it breaks coming out. Also the time and frustration of sourcing a windshield and the quality of the install all become questions. I have a perfectly good original windshield now, its just those rust bubbles which are fairly minor that get in the way of a perfect paint job that will last a long time. I'm leaning towards leave it alone and if I win the lottery some day- pull the windshield and repaint around it. The car is white so that could be done without a lot of blending issues. I'm also going with single stage paint, making it easier to blend in the future.
 

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All good points. My windshield situation is the same.. original with minor evidence of rust bubbles... I keep my car garaged, drive it and have shown the car for fun, realizing that I cannot expect to take top honors when there are 100+ point cars on the field that are full, bare metal restorations with many 10s of thousands spent for the results.

Even though rust never sleeps, do you live in an area that is relatively low in humidity and can manage keeping the car dry? I've had my GTV for 30 years and have not had any break out of rust bubbles and I'm fortunate that the areas around the windshield are stable. If the car were to sit outside, or be regularly put away wet after inclement weather, that certainly wouldn't be the case. I've seen how these cars can rust before your eyes otherwise. If you can manage keeping the car dry, you should be able to manage rust issues after the repaint.
 

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Discussion Starter #7
Thanks for your input- that helps with my decision. I live in the Tampa Bay area of Florida and although it is not ideal because of humidity, it is not as bad as you would think. With temps in 90's almost every day from June- October the heat keeps moisture at bay. I always keep the car dry in a garage and never drive in the rain. Also, the body shop can take some measures before the final paint to treat the metal at the bottom of the windshield vs pulling the windshield. Overall cost savings estimated at $3,000- $4,000 to keep the windshield in vs remove and re install. The average person would not be able to tell the difference, only car show judges would notice. I'm not looking to win trophies, just want a nice looking car that people can admire. The car is all original, 62,000 miles and only driven by two owners before me. For example, the car draws a crowd now, before the bodywork is done. I stopped into Home Depot Saturday and came out to three guys around the car, all asked questions about it and one asked if it was OK to take pictures of it. One commented it was the cleanest one he had seen.

Check out my blog/ review on www.carcamerastory.com with pictures. I think you will like it. Thanks again.
1641068
GTV In The Park.jpg
 

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Nice GTV! They are only original once... don't do anything that can't be reverted back if you appreciate that aspect.
 

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Discussion Starter #9
Yes- I agree. I go by the motto ' Do No Harm' when it comes to working on old classic cars. Keep it simple and keep it original if you can. Enjoy your GTV!
 

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My only concern is leaving the wind screen in place is that who knows what lurks beneath, my 74 owned since new looked pristine, removing the trim around the rear side windows revealed a sight I wouldn’t have believed without seeing it. Tough call, but how will the paint job hold up as the tin worm begins to venture from its hiding places. Just saying.
 

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Discussion Starter #11
That's always a concern. I have gone over every inch of the car top to bottom and can say it has very little rust compared to anything I've seen in 40 years of working on cars. Its a gamble to leave the windshield in but also a gamble to take it out- for a host of different reasons. If this car was destined for Concours competition, then no question. For anything less its a very tough call. I appreciate you input.
 

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The rear quarter window is less of an issue since removing the window is simple. I know I have rust underneath there too. All original cars that have been driven will have corrosion lurking underneath trim.

The glue-in windshield presents different issues.Removing it is a PITA with the risk of breaking it. Reinstalling it has its issues too (go to @gprockets thread on this subject). Unless the rust bubble rears its ugly head from behind the trim to the extent that it cannot be cosmetically addressed with, I'm more than happy to turn a blind eye. Maybe its denial, but I've done so for quite some time with no consequences. I just know that if/when the day comes to address it, there will be some hard choices to make because where do you stop? Take the whole car apart to deal with all of the known rust prone areas? And while the windows are out, change the stained headliner? etc, etc... I'll take originality and patina on a well maintained car over a full restoration anyday.
 

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Discussion Starter #13
Good words of wisdom. Unless money is no object ( and time). My friend in the Alfa club has 5 years and $100,000. tied up in his and he's still not finished and has never driven the car. He's not enjoying his car.
 

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I've had a look at your site, and have a question: Alfa Romeo only glued in the front windscreen?. Odd ...

In the end it comes down to: funds, original intent and personal preference. If the rear screen was not glued in and not an originality nutter (I'm normally one), I'd throw a brick at the front windscreen and replace it with a rubber sealed one so the front and the back screen's match.
Pete
ps: Be careful as brick might bounce back and hit you, or a bystander, or worse the car! ;)
 

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Before you do anything you had better get your replacement windshield in your possession and not just assume you will be able to get one if the need arises.
 
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Discussion Starter #18
I told the body shop not to remove the windshield until they had a replacement in their hands ready to go. Yes you are correct. Still not sure which way I'm going to go with this. Appreciate everyone's advice. ( And yes, the guy that has the GTV 'under construction' for 5 years is a true story. I buffed it out for him last month after it spent 1 year in the paint shop. It's a resto mod with lots of Alfaholics racing parts)
 

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Removing the trim and gasket is a crap shoot IMO. The trim may bend ....
wownowpics said:
I told the body shop not to remove the windshield until they had a replacement in their hands
You might tell them to have a set of replacement of anodized trim in their hands as well (of course, that is unobtainable). Or at least a plan for how they will straighten your existing trim after removing the old windshield and seal.

OR:

bellagt said:
...convert over to a gasketed windshield and that has its own issues with trim fitment.
Another plan could be to go with the earlier gasketed windshield if the glue-one breaks in the removal process. With all the work you are doing, and with all the difficulty of sourcing/removing/replacing a glue-in windshield, it might make sense to make this change. Classic Alfa carries replacement anodized surround trim ( RB090 GT/GTV FRONT WINDSCREEN RUBBER INSERT ), though the part description says supplies are "irregular". However, bellagt seems to suggest that there can be some issues with this (you might ask him to elaborate if you decide to go this route). Still, if some metalwork is needed to do the conversion, doing it in conjunction with rust repair and paint would make sense.

A lot to consider! Unless the existing windshield is heavily pitted, or the rust around it is particularly bad, leaving it alone might be the best option.
 

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Discussion Starter #20
That's another thing to think about, although they like the challenge of getting it out carefully and not bending the frame. They are masters at their art but Alfas can put them to the test!
 
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