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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
I purchased Ralph's 1970 Giulia up in Folsom and wanted to create a thread as I perform some work in attempt to make it my daily driver. I'm going to need some expert Alfa BB help along the way so thanks in advance for checking out my thread.

The car is quite solid and has been tons of fun and reliable for the first few weeks I have owned it. I put a few hundred miles on it getting it from the Bay area down to Los Angeles so that says a lot. The car is currently a 1750 with Weber 40's.

 

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Discussion Starter #2 (Edited)
My first mission is to stop the massive leak I have on the timing chain cover under the alternator. I could probably have gotten away with doing this while the engine was in the car but I want to clean up the bay as much as possible and take care of some "while I'm there" areas. On top of that the oil is making it's way to the exhaust manifolds and making the car stink inside, aahhh that familiar Alfa stench haha.



You can see the engine bay is quite nice, but I'd like to de-grease and clean up some of the electrical, coolant lines, etc.



A shot of the passenger side wall, I plan on streamlining the wiring you see and doing some clean wiring.



Leak source is timing chain cover, even after a short drive it starts to leak significantly here:

 

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Very cool car. That engine bay will clean up well. Interesting that it has the metal battery tray shield. I thought they were only on earlier cars but it seems they were around at least until 1970.
 

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Discussion Starter #4
I am tempted to remove tray and relocate battery to trunk..........very tempted.
 

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Great project! I look forward to your future posts.

-Peter
 

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Discussion Starter #6
OK so how about some opinions on where this oil is coming from...you think tranny seal or rear main seal?

 

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Smell it. Normal nonsynthetic trans oil has a very distinctive "burned" smell compared to engine oil. Synthetic trans oil may be a different matter.
Do you see evidence of oil leakage on the back (forward) face of the flywheel, from the engine seals?
Changing the front trans seal is relatively a doddle compared to the engine rear main seal.
Andrew
 

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I am tempted to remove tray and relocate battery to trunk..........very tempted.
Do it. The stock battery location makes oil changes a pain with a 2L due to the spin-on oil filter; I imagine your Hurlock style adapter would have the same problem. I went with an Odyssey mounted in the trunk and I like it a lot.

-Jason
 

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Discussion Starter #9
Smell it. Normal nonsynthetic trans oil has a very distinctive "burned" smell compared to engine oil. Synthetic trans oil may be a different matter.
Do you see evidence of oil leakage on the back (forward) face of the flywheel, from the engine seals?
Changing the front trans seal is relatively a doddle compared to the engine rear main seal.
Andrew
Seems so obvious now to smell it haha, thanks Andrew.
 

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Discussion Starter #10
Do it. The stock battery location makes oil changes a pain with a 2L due to the spin-on oil filter; I imagine your Hurlock style adapter would have the same problem. I went with an Odyssey mounted in the trunk and I like it a lot.

-Jason
I think I just might, i hate cutting nice factory metal, but it really would look nice after wouldn't it?
 

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I'm not one myself for making irrevocable changes to a chassis. For racing, the access and improvement in weight distribution is worth it. On the street, my take is I'd leave it. I realize everyone has their own view. Moving it to the trunk properly means affixing some kind of box/hold-down, running a long cable to the starter, etc.
Andrew
 

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Discussion Starter #12
Yes still trying to decide on that. If I am careful I'm sure I can remove the battery box from it's current location and put it away so that I can re-install it should I ever decide to.

The other thing I'd like to do it clean up the fuse box, most likely replace some of the old corroded wiring that keeps making various lights on the car go out here and there until I give the wires a jiggle. Maybe even replace the fuse box with something modern.
 

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Discussion Starter #13
I spent some time this weekend dis-assembling the engine. I did notice that the Main pulley is still the Spica-type.



Is there a better pulley for my carb application? As it is now, the pulley interferes with water pump removal. I'd like to put the correct water pump on this engine as well, I believe the one I am running now is a later pump?



Previous owner's temporary fix for that unused outlet.

 

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Discussion Starter #14
Anyone know more about getting a pulley without the Spice drive? I looked at the Pulley and it seems like you can almost remove the belt drive off of it, but I have not tried yet.
 

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Is there a better pulley for my carb application? As it is now, the pulley interferes with water pump removal.
You will find that this issue is not specific to Spica pulleys.

Of concern would be to ensure that the timing marks are correct for the engine irregardless of which pulley is used. One just can't swap pulleys and expect the timing marks to be correct.

For the waterpump, you can use a two port pump for a Euro 1750.
 

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Ok, think about what was done. Your car WAS a SPICA car from the front cover with shield, water pump, and crank pulley. It is now a mix of a Weber car and SPICA. The major differences being Webers, the front cover, the crank pulley and water pump. Locating the correct front cover without the shield is no longer easy. Some find a good (stress on GOOD) machine shop, and have it milled off, then finished by hand as smoothly as possible, finishing with glass bead blasting, and possibly powdercoat paint of some appropriate color to finish hiding the machine work. Or, you can leave it as is. This engine came after the earlier Weber Veloce engines, and as such, a 1600 Veloce front pulley and water-pump fit. With the front cover modification, a 1600 front pulley and waterpump, you have an engine very much like the slightly earlier or european 1750 with Webers.
 

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A copper plumbing cap fitting (1/2"?) fits perfectly in the hose as a cap, or people weld up the bypass port.
Not sure it's worth the hassle on the pulley; you still can't get the pump off without removing the pulley, even on a non-Spica car, can you?
Check for cracks along the keyway on the pulley, though 2000s are better in this regard than earlier cars.
Andrew
 

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I'm not one myself for making irrevocable changes to a chassis. For racing, the access and improvement in weight distribution is worth it. On the street, my take is I'd leave it. I realize everyone has their own view. Moving it to the trunk properly means affixing some kind of box/hold-down, running a long cable to the starter, etc.
I agree with what Andrew has written. Plus, you lose some trunk space when you put the battery back there. Unless your underhood battery tray is rusted (which your's doesn't appear to be) I'd leave it alone for a street car.

Gordon's suggested modifications to the timing chain cover are "correct", but personally, I wouldn't mess with the chain cover or the crankshaft pulley either. Yea, the cogged gear on the pulley and the belt guard cast into the cover are superflous, but so what? They aren't that visible, and I don't get the sense this car is on its way to Pebble.

If you really want to buy some parts, I would recommend getting a European Weber intake manifold that has a bung for the bypass hose. Then, you can retain your two outlet waterpump, and get the benefit of faster warm-up with the bypass system. Note that the hose between the intake manifold and water pump is different for Weber and Spica manifolds - Centerline carries the "European" bypass hoses.
 

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I would add that moving the battery to the trunk should only be done if you are using a dry cell battery. The fumes and leakage from a wet cell have rotted out the trunk of many fine old Alfas.....
 

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At the beginning of time, before Nomex and 5 point harnesses, I raced my AUSCA Giulia spider with the battery (No gell-cell batteries either!) in a Rubbermade battery box designed for boats. We also used marine battery terminals (No quick disconnect stuff for us!). This battery box in the trunk of my AUSCA spider has been there 46 years (or so), and there is no rust in the trunk. It is securely lashed to the trunk floor with stout nylon lashings as is used to tie down your race car on it's trailer. This box was made or some type of "ice-cube-tray" plastic that has aged MUCH better than I! It is pliable yet quite tough after all this time. (I'm tough, but not so pliable any more.)
This worked on the track, many years ago. It should work just as well on the street today. Just my opinion.
 
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