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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
A couple questions about these door handles and keys.

http://www.international-auto.com/index.cfm?fa=p&pid=2670&posid=889547

Years ago my cousins 1988 had a new lock or complete handle installed (he can't remember which), and now has two different door keys. One key that opens one of the doors, the trunk latch, and the glove compartment. The other key only opens the other door.

So....how do we go about getting the orphan door to work with the key that opens everything else? Can the barrel be reworked, or do we need to buy a blank (if that's possible), or do we need to buy new barrels for all? I suppose I could just as easily ask a locksmith but I wouldn't immediately expect to find one versed on Alfa's.

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Alfa used 4 different key profiles on the Spiders, and I believe they are referred to as #2, #4, #6 or #8. They are not interchangeable. By that I mean that a #4 key will not slide into a #8 cylinder, etc.

So, keeping that in mind, do the 2 different keys that you have contain matching profiles? In other words, will the key that locks and unlocks everything (except for the one "oddball" exterior door lock) slide into the "oddball" door cylinder? If so:
1. Remove the "oddball" door handle.
2. Take it to a locksmith with the key that opens everything else and he can re-key the cylinder in that door to match the key that works on everything else.

If the two different keys will not slide into each other's cylinders, you will need to get a Spider door cylinder that has the same "profile" or "key code" as everything else in the car and once again a locksmith will have to key that new cylinder to the other cylinder's pattern, and he can also install the cylinder in your existing door handle (if you bring both of them in together).

Most locksmiths say they can do the whole thing if you bring the car to them, but if you want your door panel removed and re-installed properly, and you want all of the correct panel clips put back on, you should take the time to remove the door handle yourself.
 

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Discussion Starter #4
Follow up and question.

I was mistaken... the orphan is the trunk latch. Does the same apply as far as being able to re-key it.

One key is a 6, orphan is a 8.

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Yes

Yes. The same rules apply. You will need a cylinder of the appropriate key profile to replace in your existing trunk latch.

If you remove the black vinyl covered vertical panel that the trunk and gas cap latches are attached to, you will be able to disconnect the cable to the trunk latch from the lever, and un-bolt the lever from the panel to take to a locksmith (with your new cylinder).

It's great that you know the key patterns of what you have. You might be able to find a used trunk latch with the key pattern you need cheaper or easier than trying to hunt down just the cylinder
 

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Discussion Starter #6
It's great that you know the key patterns of what you have. You might be able to find a used trunk latch with the key pattern you need cheaper or easier than trying to hunt down just the cylinder
Yes, it helps to know the numbers. What are the chances the parts car that my cousin and I share has #6 keys? 25%. Crossing my fingers!

The reason for this last question was I was thinking the barrels in the latches wouldn't be the same as the doors, but I guess they must to use the same key??

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talk about luck!

Hi Mike,

When I purchased my car, I got an ignition key. Period.

One of the domestic suppliers had two styles of key blanks in stock, so in an attempt to determine my key pattern, I bought one of each (2 & 4 I think). Wouldn't you know it - neither fit my cylinders.

I found another blank (a 6 as I recall) for sale in Australia and bought one of those ($8 USD including shipping). Lucky me, it slid into both doors, the glove box cylinder, plus the trunk and gas cap latches!

Shortly after that I had one door apart for something so I took the opportunity to remove the exterior handle and take it to a locksmith. I told him I wanted a key that would work in it. He made me one, and when I got back home that same key worked in all the locks! They were all original.

BTW, I hardly ever lock anything. Trunk occasionally.
 

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Discussion Starter #8
Hi Mike,

When I purchased my car, I got an ignition key. Period.

One of the domestic suppliers had two styles of key blanks in stock, so in an attempt to determine my key pattern, I bought one of each (2 & 4 I think). Wouldn't you know it - neither fit my cylinders.

I found another blank (a 6 as I recall) for sale in Australia and bought one of those ($8 USD including shipping). Lucky me, it slid into both doors, the glove box cylinder, plus the trunk and gas cap latches!

Shortly after that I had one door apart for something so I took the opportunity to remove the exterior handle and take it to a locksmith. I told him I wanted a key that would work in it. He made me one, and when I got back home that same key worked in all the locks! They were all original.

BTW, I hardly ever lock anything. Trunk occasionally.
Somewhat similar story with me. My car came with 2 ignition keys and only 1 door key, and that door key was not the original so no code. I searched high and low anywhere I could think of, even in Europe (Portugal) that summer, and nothing. Then I needed a car part and instead of waiting to get something shipped from the US, I went to a Alfa Mechanic (Specialist) an hour away. So I said to him, do you know where I can buy a key blank, and then out comes the shoe box with probably 50+ keys... bonus!

Later I found the website keys4classics.com and that might be the Australia place you refer too.
 
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