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Discussion Starter #1
Purchased as a bare metal roller, this Super has had everything rebuilt or modified. It's painted with base coat/clear coat.
Engine is a 1600 with .040" over pistons, about 10.5:1 CR and runs on regular fuel.
Completely rewired with a new fuse panel under the dash.
Rebuilt suspension, adjustable camber links, Koni shocks, rear mounted front antiroll bar.
Twelve gallon fuel cell, central fire system, roll cage, SOVREN log book.
Since it's been built it's been on the track three times, remainder of the time it has been street driven in Arizona and parked in a garage.
Stock wheels for the street, wide rims for the track tires.
I have a new carpet kit with insulation, still in the box.

Before and After!!
 

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Discussion Starter #2
And some in-process photos

All new wiring and fuse panel, rebuilt suspension with rear mounted ARB, limited slip differential built with extra clutches.

Suspension modifications and springs give a very good street and highway ride on Sumotomo street tires, and wide rims and track tires give nuetral handling on track days.
 

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Discussion Starter #4
Thanks for the comments

Greeting BBers

Among the questions and comments I've recieved, a suggestion was made that perhaps the racing decals ought to go, particularly for someone to drive on the street and not be a "gendarme magnet". Good sugestion, so off they came.

Another was that the Alfa decals on the air cleaners "kind of cheapened the look of the car" and were a distraction. Since they were on the air cleaners when I got them, I knew I wouldn't miss them. Gone!

Now the Italian colors on the cam cover are another story!!! In a playful mood I painted my cam cover to differentiate my engine/car from the other Supers and engines that I had built that were running in the same series that I was.

So. Leave it as is??

Or paint it??

Caio, George
 

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George, some of us are completely and utterly mystified as to why this very nice car has not sold. It reminds me of Randy;s very nice "S" for sale. The car and price looks right, for someone who is looking for a good fun trackday car or boy toy street racer. (Aside: Do you have a HP dyno or estimate?) If you have to remove 7 stickers and debate a bit of paint on the cam cover, my personal opinion is that someone is grasping at straws or stickers. Perhaps you can show what is invested in the car? We know no race-prepped or restoed cars recover their money but this appears to be priced right for a ready to use car. Good luck. Heep the valve cover painted, just don't paint the pumpkin or t-bar red.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
-------just don't paint the pumpkin or t-bar red. ----- OOPS! Too late Randy.:D:D:

The conversations about pros and cons of the decals and lettering were with good friends such as yourself on what a new owner would probably like to start with. Besides it is not being raced, don't need the letters/decals, and I love the lines of a Super in all RED.

As far as it not having sold, I think there are two reasons: one I just haven't worked at selling it as it is a great car to tour in, and also I take it to the local car shows and meet up with the other car nuts in the area.

And two, if I were still up North of Seattle it would have been long gone since there are so many Alfisti that know me and and the cars I have built.

I think the general perception is:
"AN ALFA IN THE DESERT??"
"Arizona is nothing more than sand dunes with bleached cow carcasses and old dehydrated prospectors along side the wagon trails".
"How would I get there???"

Well don't tell anybody but your closest friends, but I'm only six hours from SanDiego and LA by car, and about two hours (+-) from Seattle by plane.
 

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I have seen this car up close and have ridden in it. The paint is amazing and the engine pulls like a train ( albeit a 4 cyl train :) ). The handling is awesome and the price is a steal. If I didn't already have an almost identical car I would buy this one.
 

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Discussion Starter #9 (Edited)
Requests for more details.

Thanks for the comments and questions, and in response I'm posting the history of my Super.

Here goes:


Giulia Super Found, a history.

After a long search for a Super for myself with minimal or no rust, I finally bought one in 2007 that was a project car at a local race shop. They had stripped the car and had it media blasted so it was easy to see that the car had little or no rust. Even though I paid twice as much for a bare car as opposed to one that was complete and running, it was certainly worth it in the long run. I knew the prior owner and he had kept it in a garage A careful inspection showed that only the lower curve of the right ¼ panel (where that blind boxed area is) needed replacing and some treatment where the gas tank is mounted in the trunk. After making the repairs, the next step was treating all the hidden areas with phosphoric acid, a process used in ship building to convert rust. Then to the paint shop where the car was prepped, sealed, and painted inside and out with base coat/clear coat. Months had passed.

The chassis was stripped of all mechanicals except for the steering gear, and the process was started to install all late model (‘72/74) running gear, rebuilding the pieces as I went along. Some pieces were modified such as the limited slip differential, which was put together with additional clutch plates to improve corner exit speeds. The chassis took over a year to complete, in between building cars for others and racing my ’69 GTV.

The rear wheel track on a Super is the same as the GTV and Spiders, while the body is narrower, (same rear axle) so it is difficult to get any wide tires under the rear. There is a lot of room inside the wheel tub on the inside of the tire, and one solution is to have the rear axle narrowed, a costly process. So my solution was to make up a fixture that would hold the aluminum wheel rim in a very large lathe so the inside mounting flange could be machined down and inset the wheel and tire towards the center of the car. It works well. Now wide tires, and no rub.

A number of the Alfisti in the Pacific Northwest were racing Supers, and I had set up a few to run 1969 FIA and SCCA Touring Car rules, so the interior and glass was installed to meet those rules, mainly glass front and rear, windshield wipers, wind-up door glass, door panels, etc. TC rules also called for working lights, so I rewired the car with new wiring and a relocation of a new fuse panel inside the car, since the stock fuse panel was under the hood, subject to corrosion as well as being of the old style porcelain fuses. For ease of adding circuits and component protection I followed the factory wiring diagram. So now we have high and low beams, park lights and turn signals. A third brake light was installed on the inside of the back glass.

I had all the late style calipers rebuilt by a trusted shop, and they used new pistons to ensure resistance to rust and corrosion which is common to Alfa ATE brakes. The brake piping was replaced with new as necessary and an additional bleed valve was added to assist in a complete bleeding process. Now there is always a good firm pedal.

Koni adjustable shocks and after-market springs were installed with spring rates chosen to give good compliance on the track and a good ride with street tires. Most of the Supers have the front antiroll bar mounts (the front crossmember) rusted out, but this car has solid mounts, so I initially installed a Shankle front bar which worked well; subsequently I installed one of my rear mounted front anti roll bars that really made the car neutral handling as well as stiffening up the chassis at the steering gear and idler arm mountings. This really gives good feedback to the driver.

Over the years of building Alfa engines I had worked towards enhancing the torque curve rather than just increasing horsepower, and keeping the RPMs low to lessen frictional losses. Working with the cylinder head guru, the cam grinder, other engine builders sharing experiences, runs on the dyno as well as track and street testing over the years, has given good results towards that goal. Also light weight engine components cut down on the amount of power used just to spin the crank and pistons, so this engine has .040 over lighter than stock Mondial racing pistons, light weight wrist pins and selected rods with stronger rod bolts. A light weight aluminum flywheel and GTA clutch plate with a special lining on the disc help keep everything spinning freely. A rebuilt and balanced driveshaft with one of Wes’ “Giubo savers” sends to power to the rear.

From the air cleaner to the tail pipe: I chose the Shankle cast aluminum air cleaner set-up as it provides a plenum to help low end torque with good high RPM flow. They needed to have Aluma-poxy added to the mounting flange to give good port matching to the Webers. The Webers were rebuilt and carefully sized venturies with many jetting changes made for a good running set-up. The head was ported by Steve following years of flowbench work and experience, I installed high lift/short duration cams that I had welded and ground to a proven profile, with new followers, the head was milled just so to give good mixture control and have a final CR of +-10.5:1. (All legal improvements.) Testing has proven the design works best on regular fuel. (By design). The cast iron headers were chosen for a number of reasons: because they hold in the heat to help volumetric efficiency, keep the heat away from the engine, and they are the same size and shape as most steel headers. I made the down pipes to the third wye larger so it works like a stepped header, into a modified wye, out the tailpipe to the stainless steel muffler and out comes a quiet exhaust sound.

The block was align bored and drilled for additional oiling to #2 and #4 mains, the water passages were drilled for better cooling to the liners. The crank was polished, and drilled to clean out the oil passages then tapped and plugged. The cams were degreed in and I re-curved the distributor advance and installed an electronic module to fire the 8mm plug wires.

The radiator was re-cored with a 14 fin twin tube core, and then shrouded on the top, bottom and sides to direct air flow through it. The stock oil filter was replaced with an adaptor to a remote filter base using an oversize filter then to the oil cooler mounted just behind the grill with shrouding for air flow. Mechanical gauges show oil pressure, water temp and oil temp. The water flow and thermostat were modified to give even temp control, even here in the desert, without a fan. Just don’t idle too long.

Safety: The full rollcage has the door bars installed at an angle to make for easier entry and give good shoulder/side protection, while the main bar was moved to the rear to give room for tall drivers. Light weight formed seats, with the drivers side on heavy duty tracks continue the lightning and safety format. Not wanting to cut up the body and to not add weight to the rear of the car, the fuel cell was mounted in the spare tire well, filtered fuel is pumped by a centrifugal pump to a fuel regulator and even the tank vent is filtered. A remote fire suppression system is installed with copper coated steel lines to keep the tech inspectors happy.

Stock wheels were mounted with new 185-70-14 Sumitomo HTR street tires for touring and grocery getting and give a very good ride. Since shoulder harnesses and latch mechanisms are a driver’s preference, as are tire makes and compounds, that is about what it takes to drive to track and have fun. I even have a fitted Wolf storage cover to keep the dew off, and keep the paint a deep gloss.

Because of the lack of vintage racing here in Arizona, I’m currently looking for the right buyer.
 

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I also think the cam cover is very very cool! It's just $18,450 overpriced. LOL

Bump to the top for a nice car
 

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Discussion Starter #14
Drool worthy.

Not on my paint job, Don!!

It was fun for me to build and now its fun to drive.

One neat thing about Supers is that people don't mistake one for a Fiat :)
 
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