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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I am hoping to replace the oil seal for the differential pinion of my 1960 Sprint. I made a nut removal sprocket from a 27mm socket. However the nut doesn't want to move. I wanted to check if it is a left or right hand threaded nut before applying too much force? Confirmation would be appreciated.

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Conventional left undo thread - use an air wrench tool to rattle it loose, they are usually tiger tight.

A length of angle iron or flat bar across 2 of the pinion holes stops the pinion from moving... hold this tight or better still wrap the end in cloth & place under a block of wood under the sill flange before triggering the air wrench

Ciao
Greig
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Conventional left undo thread - use an air wrench tool to rattle it loose, they are usually tiger tight.

A length of angle iron or flat bar across 2 of the pinion holes stops the pinion from moving... hold this tight or better still wrap the end in cloth & place under a block of wood under the sill flange before triggering the air wrench

Ciao
Greig
Conventional left undo thread - use an air wrench tool to rattle it loose, they are usually tiger tight.

A length of angle iron or flat bar across 2 of the pinion holes stops the pinion from moving... hold this tight or better still wrap the end in cloth & place under a block of wood under the sill flange before triggering the air wrench

Ciao
Greig
Thanks Greig. Confirmation and advice much appreciated.

Kind regards
Marc
 

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Greig can confirm or dispel this, but along with the seal you may need to apply a Permatex sealer on the threads before a re-torqued nut goes back on. Mine had a small leak with a new seal without doing that. It’s dry now.

I also paint-marked where the nut is now (factory?) torqued as a reference. I would count how many turns it takes to get it backed off regardless of where it’s marked because it could be one or more turns too loose or too tight from where it is now. If your diff is quiet now, you’re in great shape. Carl’s recent post on these is an excellent tool in itself.
 

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Absolutely - a bit of sealer on the threads is very advisable
 

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I would caution you against using an impact gun/air gun to rattle it loose unless you’re certain that the socket you’re using is made for such use. Typically they are not, and the perches for the castellated nut don’t have much meat on them.

-tj
 

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Good point TJ, the socket I have is a good fit on the castellated nut

Ciao
Greig
 

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Greig can confirm or dispel this, but along with the seal you may need to apply a Permatex sealer on the threads before a re-torqued nut goes back on. Mine had a small leak with a new seal without doing that. It’s dry now.

I also paint-marked where the nut is now (factory?) torqued as a reference. I would count how many turns it takes to get it backed off regardless of where it’s marked because it could be one or more turns too loose or too tight from where it is now. If your diff is quiet now, you’re in great shape. Carl’s recent post on these is an excellent tool in itself.
If it leaked with a new seal it was probably from a grove worn in the sealing area of the flange. That is what SKF sells "Speedi-sleeve" to correct. Also I would recommend double lip seals instead of original single lip seal.
 
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