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Great to hear the current owner has tired of it. Hopefully the next owner is more sympathetic to its history!

Pete
 

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I agree PSk.
My wife and I have a close friendship with Ross and Lynda Flewell-Smith and the G1 (Milly). The attached photo was taken in early 1984 – my wife in the G1 as it was after Ross and Lynda's restoration efforts.
Unfortunately Ross passed away last year and he always said the owner of Milly could do what they wanted as it was their car but he was very upset at the fictional history that was being attributed to this G1, Chassis 6018, as the true history is well known and documented.
Below is the tribute to Ross written in June 2016 by David Wright, ex Alfa Romeo Australia Manager, which says it all.

"A tribute to Ross and his beloved Milly, the 1921 Alfa G1.

I first learned of Ross's massive undertaking to restore the G1 in 1969 through a mutual friend, the late Ern Stock. Ern, who lived in Victoria but a frequent Queensland visitor was, along with myself, a founding member of AROCA (Vic). It was during one of Ern's Queensland visits that he met Ross and learned that in 1964, Ross had located and acquired a 1921 Alfa G1 in Winton, western Queensland. This was an amazing discovery as only 50 G1's were produced, 9 of which were imported by the Australian Alfa dealer, Overseas Motors, Melbourne. Even more remarkable, Ross's G1, chassis number 6018, was and is today, the only G1 known to survive and it is not difficult to imagine the challenge associated with this restoration.

When found on the property at Winton by Ross, Milly had spent 25 years on blocks driving a water pump. The body had been removed, wheels chopped down, tail shaft cut and the engine replaced by a Buick to reduce fuel consumption. With other parts missing or smashed, the enormity of this project was such that very few people could have taken it on.

Given that there was no other survivor, very little was known about Alfa G1's at that time but, during his extensive research, Ross located a few parts in northern Victoria from a G1 that had been scrapped in the late 1940's after colliding with an un-lit stationary log truck. In1969, Ern Stock and I visited the property near Rutherglen where these parts had been located but we were unable to obtain anything else for the G1. Fortunately, Ross had informed the Alfa Romeo headquarters in Milan of his find and the curator of the Alfa museum, Luigi Fusi, was very helpful. Along with blue prints of missing mechanical parts, Luigi Fusi provided drawings and photos of bodies that had been fitted to G1s enabling Ross to get this massive project underway.

Ross was an instrument maker in the RAAF and he and Lynda lived in Air Force housing when the restoration commenced. If the magnitude of the task was not enough, the challenge of tackling this without a fully equipped workshop is unimaginable. Constructing a total of five bodies and accommodating a car close to the size of a Rolls-Royce Silver Ghost in these circumstances was a tribute to Ross's resourcefulness and Lynda's patience! In 1974, after almost 10 years, the restoration was complete and the G1 was restored to its full glory.

Coinciding with the completion of this magnificent restoration, the Australian Alfa Romeo Pre-1940 Register was formed and Ross, with his superb G1, became a member. The crowning achievement of Ross's activity in the Pre-1940 Register was the G1's outright victory in the Australian Mille Miglia which was held in 1978 over the main highways from Brisbane to Melbourne. I had the privilege of driving the G1 a for short distance on this event which was an unforgettable experience.

It must have been a terrible wrench when Ross parted with Milly but fortunately its two later owners in Australia took very good care of her. However, strong international interest was created when the G1 was taken to Pebble Beach where it won a major award. Most regrettably, the outcome of this success was that it was acquired by an American collector and the car left Australia. Even more regrettable is that a ficticious Italian motor racing history is now attributed to this car in an endeavour to enhance its value.

Following completion of the restoration Ross wrote a most informative article on the G1 which was published in two parts by Restored Cars magazine. The facts are that this G1, chassis number 6018, was imported by Overseas Motors, Melbourne and fitted with a local touring body when new in 1922. It was then sold to a wealthy grazier and taken to Queensland. Ross's article describes his discovery of the G1 in Winton in 1964 and its subsequent restoration in full detail and as such, clearly recorded the car's actual history. The anguish that Ross experienced when he learned of the mis-representation is hard to imagine and completely undeserving considering that this car survives today entirely through his efforts.

Vale Ross, you will always be remembered for your integrity, wonderful restorations skills and as a true Alfisti.

David Wright"

Wendy with Milly.jpg
 
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