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Discussion Starter #22
Happy New Year!

Sadly I do not have my 66 Giulia Sprint GT Veloce back yet (big surprise). In October I had the front left tire chuck its tread while I was on the freeway and it damaged the paint on the top of the fender, so back to the painter she went for repair. In two weeks she'll have been with the painter for 3 months and it's back to the usual procrastination. Every week he says "I'm going to paint it this weekend." Every weekend passes without the car getting painted.

It's been deja vu all over again and I'm frustrated as you might guess.

With Renzo out of the garage I set my sights on figuring out the engine trouble with the Giulietta and after two attempts to get a head gasket thick enough to get the required clearance, and two sets of bent valves I have finally thrown in the towel and admitted that it's time for to replace the head. There's some obvious wear in the #4 wrist pin (I can get a little bit of rotary movement in the piston with my fingers, even in the bore) so it's time for a complete overhaul. At this point I'm hoping that the crank and block are re-usable so I'll likely rebuild the original Veloce engine in 1300cc specification, hopefully with a set of Italian DCOEs if I can find them. The linkage and condition of the original DCO3s is to sketchy and I'd prefer to put them in a box and run new carbs.

Right now I'm looking for a relatively unskimmed 1300 head to start the rebuild, so if anyone knows of one, preferably on the West Coast, please let me know.

On a brighter note, I visited the 1900C SS in Redlands last week and she's coming along. I'm hoping that the body will be finished in the next couple of months and be back in my shop. Then it will be time to start assembling parts to figure out what I am missing, and hopefully prove that all major components are ready for road service. Due to the fact that 1900s got satin/flat black paint on the engine bay, underside, and trunk, I will be able to assemble most of the drive train and trim to make sure it fits, and then remove all exterior trim before exterior paint.

Here's a couple photos of the 1900.

IMG_1006 (1) by tjveloce, on Flickr

IMG_1010 (1) by tjveloce, on Flickr

IMG_1013 by tjveloce, on Flickr

IMG_1012 (1) by tjveloce, on Flickr

IMG_3573 by tjveloce, on Flickr

IMG_1053 by tjveloce, on Flickr

On another note, you may have seen the Series II that is going across the block at Goodings next weekend. I don't know what the reserve is but it's apparently in the $400Kish range. The car belongs to a Southern Californian and the body was done by the same shop that is doing mine.

Ciao!

-tj in the Cruz Mtns
 

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Discussion Starter #23
More progress on 10321. Maybe she’ll be home by spring. In the mean time, the rain continues here in the Santa Cruz mountains.

-tj
 

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Discussion Starter #25
I just received these photos of the progress on the front of 10321. She's coming along nicely, but perhaps the most challenging part is yet to be fabricated; the inside "wing" and surrounding interior profile on the air intakes.

Still, the progress which eluded me for so many years is now being realized.

IMG_4277 by tjveloce, on Flickr

IMG_4275 by tjveloce, on Flickr

IMG_4273 by tjveloce, on Flickr

IMG_4276 by tjveloce, on Flickr

Ciao!

-tj in the Cruz Mtns
 

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TJ, judging from what they have fabricated so far I reckon these people are able to make anything well, those contours are pretty. The nose and lower valance illustrate their technique, a section at time, the buck is the thing that that remains fixed while all the shaping is referenced to it, incidentally the buck would have been a lot of work to create again we see another discipline wood work, restoration it is so diverse.
Tim
 

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Discussion Starter #28
Tim,

You are correct. The shop where she's being loved upon has far more exotic machinery than my Alfa in it. Last time I was there a Duesenberg, V16 Cadillac, and several other pre and post-war American icons were being restored.

Ironically they had no prior experience with 1900s until another owner brought a couple to them for restoration. I'd already hired another fabricator to build the buck, but it was only 75% of the way complete when I fired him and started with this shop. Between the other owner's Series II and mine they were able to determine the correct lines for the front end of the cars.

Again, it's a bit of a misconception that "everyone of these cars are different." There is a strong consistency in shape, line and build amongst Series II cars. The bodies were built on bucks and indeed there was even some outsourcing of the body panels by CarrozTouring when they were built.


TJ, judging from what they have fabricated so far I reckon these people are able to make anything well, those contours are pretty. The nose and lower valance illustrate their technique, a section at time, the buck is the thing that that remains fixed while all the shaping is referenced to it, incidentally the buck would have been a lot of work to create again we see another discipline wood work, restoration it is so diverse.
Tim
Ciao!
-tj
 

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Discussion Starter #30 (Edited)
Who can tell me with authority the style of the winged "Touring" badge that goes on the hood of a Series II car, above the word "Superleggera." It seems there are several different sizes but more importantly, am I correct in believing they should just say "Touring" in the center?

I have a small one which is 1.25" from wingtip to wingtip which reads "Touring" and a larger one which reads "TouringSuperleggera" (which I believe is NOT right as they didn't use that name until 1961) which is 2" from wingtip to wingtip. Is the small one the right one for the hood?

IMG_1745 by tjveloce, on Flickr

-tj in the Cruz Mountains
 

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Discussion Starter #31
10321’s pretty face is coming together nicely.



-tj in the Cruz Mtns
 

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Discussion Starter #32

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Discussion Starter #35
More progress on the front of 10321...almost ready to install permanently.

IMG_5347 by tjveloce, on Flickr

IMG_5346 by tjveloce, on Flickr

Now that I've got your attention, I have a question about Nardi floor shift gearboxes. A friend and I were chatting yesterday about the Nardi steering wheel vs. the original Alfa one, and the nature of Nardi floor shift gearboxes. I hadn't paid much thought to it but assumed that they usually got purchased together. Further, some in the 1900 community have suggested that one way to know whether or not a 1900C SS left Carrozzeria Touring with the Nardi floor shift is to look at the steering column itself. As you know, the column shifter required a u-shaped cutout in the steering column for the linkage. It has been said that if the Nardi floor shift gearbox was installed at Touring, the steering column would NOT have that u-shaped cutout. So, if a 1900C SS has a column with the u-shaped cutout, it did not leave Touring with a Nardi floor shift gearbox.

Can you shed any light on this? Also, did all 1900C Sprints and Super Sprints that got a Nardi floor shift kit also get a Nardi steering wheel? Did they come as a package? Finally, I assumed (although I can't tell you why) that by the end of the run of Series II Super Sprints, most came with the Nardi floor shift. What do you think?

I've not been able to find any period interior shots that might show a non-grooved steering column with a Nardi floor shift kit, or even with a Nardi steering wheel.

Neither the Millenove book, nor Carrozzeria Touring Superleggera have anything to say on the matter.

-tj in the Cruz Mtns
 

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pictures nardi and more

Hi All,

FYI

some 1900CSS where equipped with a floorshift gearbox , this is a original AR gearbox and not a nardi. ( see picture 1 ) and these cars have a not a U shape in the alu column.

There is also the NARDI aftersale conversion for mounting on the gearbox
( see picture 2 ) , you can remove all the steering/column shifting parts , but then you have an U shape in the alu column.

the Nardi steering wheel was an option for all the 1900 models.


If there is interest :

I have made NEW repro copy of the original NARDI conversion for mounting on the gearbox with modified better H shifting and a locking system for 5th gear and reverse .
I make also repro of the non U shape alu column and make conversion .

We do also make conversions and complete rebuilts from steering/column shifter to original AR floorshifter ( picture 3 ) and (picture 2 , which was rebuilt and convert from steering to floorshifter )

for info PM ([email protected] )


rgds Franco
 

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picture floorshift

Hi All,

FYI


I have an original 1900CSS with floorshifter and a 1900 CSS which I did conversion from steering/column shift to original floorshift.

I will post soon picture of the alu column conversion without U

and in picture attached the original floorshift and no U in alu column .


rgds Franco
 

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Discussion Starter #38
Ciao Franco,

I knew I could count on a good response from you. So am I correct then, in saying that the Nardi gearbox conversion may have been installed by Touring (or whomever?) and that in such a case the steering column would have the groove for the original column shift?

It's hard for me to imagine a small dealer, in the mid to late 50s, taking a brand new car apart in order to install the Nardi conversion. I assumed that most period installations would have been done by Touring or the other coach builders.


-tj in the Cruz Mtns


Hi All,

FYI

some 1900CSS where equipped with a floorshift gearbox , this is a original AR gearbox and not a nardi. ( see picture 1 ) and these cars have a not a U shape in the alu column.

There is also the NARDI aftersale conversion for mounting on the gearbox
( see picture 2 ) , you can remove all the steering/column shifting parts , but then you have an U shape in the alu column.

the Nardi steering wheel was an option for all the 1900 models.


If there is interest :

I have made NEW repro copy of the original NARDI conversion for mounting on the gearbox with modified better H shifting and a locking system for 5th gear and reverse .
I make also repro of the non U shape alu column and make conversion .

We do also make conversions and complete rebuilts from steering/column shifter to original AR floorshifter ( picture 3 ) and (picture 2 , which was rebuilt and convert from steering to floorshifter )

for info PM ([email protected] )


rgds Franco
 

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Discussion Starter #40 (Edited)
Yet another bit of "carchaeology" for your afternoon reading pleasure. It has been often times asserted that, among the coachbuilt 1900s, "no two are alike," an argument with which I've taken exception, at least with regard to the Series II Super Sprints (the final back of 56-58 'three window' variants).

My friend Giovanni Bianchi Anderloni's "Carrozzeria Touring Superleggera" supports my claim, mentioning that toward the end of the run the company had even begun outsourcing manufacture of some of the "pressed body panels, implying that they were being "mass produced" prior to fitment to the chassis. So it goes that while minor differences may appear among some of the 580 examples built, they all share very similar general shapes, styling cues, and dimensions. Note that I am not implying that body panels, doors, trunk lids, etc. are interchangeable from one body to another.

One small detail that I have noticed on some cars is a triangular "notch" above each tail light, where the rear fender profile meets the vertical face to which the tail light is mounted. I have seen some cars with no notch at all, and some with a very small notch, perhaps only 3/8" of an inch from base to the top.

10321 was a car that suffered significant front end damage during her early years. It was so bad, and had been repaired improperly so many times that we had no choice but to have a completely new front end fabricated. The rest of the body however, was in very good condition, and being that she'd been in storage and not driven from ~1974 to present, kept her out of harm's way.

When the body shop stripped the paint and body filler off the car, they found rather large "notches" above the taillights, larger than I'd seen before on any other car. I wondered if the car left the factory that way and did some research. Again, "Carrozzeria Touring Superleggera" offered one telling photo, a period shot of the rear end of a Series II. The old black and white photo does lack the high resolution detail we're used to today, but on at least the right side of the car, there appears to be a notch as large as the one on my car. Still, I wasn't sure if it was a reflection or some other artifact on the photo. Then the project manager at the shop doing my body sent me the photos below. As you can see, the one from the inside of the car clearly shows a piece of aluminum tacked in place behind the notch. As there was no damage to the rear of the car, I feel comfortable in assuming that at least on 10321, the notches above the taillights are both original, and correct.

IMG_2782 by tjveloce, on Flickr

IMG_5581 by tjveloce, on Flickr

IMG_5584 by tjveloce, on Flickr

IMG_1007 (2) by tjveloce, on Flickr

-tj in the Cruz Mtns
 
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